The Rice Pot Matters--Thank-you Sleevendog!

plllog

I'm not a big rice fan, and I'm picky about it when I eat it. I have some die hard rice eaters, however, who will take it cooked any way. Local rice (California) has a lot of arsenic from the soil so should only be consumed judiciously. I generally try to find rice with less likelihood of significant heavy metals, and cook just enough for the meal so I don't have to be creative with the leftovers (I can always find a use for any amount of pasta...).


There was a learning curve for different kinds of basmati to get the results relevant to different cuisines, made worse by my small pots, which by design aren't steam tight, and needed to be plugged. That's not even mentioning the differences for all the other kinds of rice (though I seem to find risotto remarkably easy--just the vagaries of fate, I guess--but that doesn't count).


Eventually, that all gave me an excuse to buy a little John Pawson/Demeyere, 1.5 qt. Dutch Oven style, at a Zwillings sale. It's a perfect size for little things like making rice, and does a fine job, while being so beautiful in an architectural way. It's a fine little pot for making a little rice in, and so much easier!


The other day, however, I needed a bunch of rice for a casserole. I was using my 4 qt. Staub Dutch oven that Sleevendog showed us on sale (also at Zwillings?) a year ago, ostensibly for baking high hydration bread in. I tried it for the bread and had sorry fails (I can bake every other kind of bread I've put my hand to, but the dump wet dough in hot Dutch oven just eludes me. OTOH, I couldn't turn down the remarkable price for Staub quality when I didn't have a pot in such a useful size and shape (I had a long handle 3 qt. and an oval 5 qt. for tall sided pans near that size).


Anyway, you guessed it, I made the rice in the Staub. It's the bestest of best rice I've ever made! White basmati--nothing special. The trick, I'm sure, is the drip bumps inside the Staub lid. As the condensation forms, the bumps encourage it to bead and drip back into the pot. The high sides around the lid may also help keep in the steam, but I don't know enough physics to be sure on that. I didn't have to intercede about anything. The pot did it all. Finished with some EVOO, herbs and seasoning. So fluffy! So sweet! So didn't have to bother with it! So good!


Thank, Sleevendog! I've been getting a lot of very good use out of this pot, and it's now my go-to rice pot, too!

SaveComment16Like
Comments (16)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bragu_DSM 5

I have not tried rice in mine, but the staub is my goto pot for bread, stews, chili, candy, pork shoulder and the like ...

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Islay Corbel

I'm glad you love your pot. I think basmati is the easiest to get right. Just 1.5 water to 1 rice, boil 6 minutes, turn off the heat and leave to steam.....15 20 minutes. Just leave it. Then you have dry, fluffy rice. I use a cheap IKEA enamel pot.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

That's how my mother taught me to make rice. I've done most methods at some point, just to try them (boil loose like pasta is way overratedj. Making rice is dead easy. I assume that rice makers were invented for Asian people with minimal kitchens to give them more cooking space, not that so many people were too dumb to boil water.. I just found it remarkable that the same rice, same method, was significantly better in the Staub dutch oven.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Bumblebeez SC Zone 7

The only rice I regularly eat is organic brown, and I have read that California grown has the lowest amounts of arsenic compared to other parts of the world.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Just read an article about all the various grains and the best ones...and ones to avoid. (I'll look for it) probably bookmarked it.

That sale was last March or April 2020. Sweet deal and a great size. I picked up the turquoise for the beach house. We had started packing then Canada shut their border crossings. Still closed.

I have a kitchen 'treat budget'. (self imposed). 5-6 years ago, cyber Monday, I treated myself to a few things for the kitchen. The 1.5 qrt rice-cocotte and the 5 qrt rounded bottom. The 1.5 was 79$. 5 qrt, 99$. The following year sent the 1.5 to my SIL and my brother. (they have been obsessed with my mixed grain the past few years)

I see it everywhere...Solah just made a cheese soufflé for Ytube Food52


Then this past summer I got this e-mail introducing the new turmeric color. Sold out. (I thought they pinched my photo for a second, 😂)...the wild rice is a bit under-cooked, 😜...not my spoon


Yes, beyond excellent for rice, grains, beans. I pull out 4-5 choices from around a dozen varieties from my pantry kept in qrt ball jars. Perfect every time. I think it is the steam drip nubs.

My Staub Stack lived on my back rarely used right burner the entire 2020 year. One or two used every day.

Nice to hear the 4 quart is also great for rice. My 4 usually has a braise, stew, soup or a chili in it. Rice/grain/bean in my baby 1.5 on the left back simmer burner.


1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

You might find this interesting. Found this while starting a bbq summer food folder. The Staub baby and the 4.75 have coma shaped steam drippers...


1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

Cool! LeC makes one with cone shaped drippers. Er...spikes? I love that the nubs on my Staub don't prevent using the lid in a normal manner. I think there might be an advantage to the larger surface area of the spikes, but the commas are a better approach to that.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Quick recipe hint if anyone cares. I fibbed a bit. I probably have 3 dozen different grains....then seeds, nuts, beans...🙄

I like my winter/summer wheats. Chewy and difficult to overcook. They go in my pot first, 10 minute head start to a good boil/simmer. Then add a 1/4 cup wild rice, 15 minutes, some quinoa, or any other ancient grain.

Another 10-15, Lentils, split peas, frozen peas, edamame, etc...the quick ones 5-10 minutes later. I often add any fresh crisper veg on top to steam. Chard, kales.

I have started the pot with a mirepoix but I only use my Sunday cooked grains till Wednesday, day three. The pups get the leftovers beyond that. So I do not want them to have any onion, salt or spices. I keep it clean and spice for us as I use it.

I like the variety. I could cook two cups of rice, or one cup of rice and a 1/4 cup each of four others.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindac92

I have an orang Le Cruset sauce pan that I have been using for rice for easily 30 years.
My alternate method is in a casserole in the microwave, bring to a boil and let it sit for 15 minutes. But i have had the Le C pan longer than i have had a microwave!

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
John Liu

Should we have a rice thread, for tips and recipes? Or shall this thread morph into such?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mxk3

Rice cooker all the way for me. Zojirishi. Comes out perfect every time, both the short-grain rice DH prefers, and the long grain (basmatic or jasmine) I prefer. I've found the key to perfect fluffy basmati is not to use too much water (1.5x works well).

Save     Thanked by plllog
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

John, morph away if you want to, or start a rice thread. I don't think this thread is going any farther in the this pot works better direction. :)


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gardengirl37232

I use a rice cooker too and consider it well worth the space it takes in my kitchen.

Pillog, while the Japanese did invent the rice cooker, it was not because of minimal kitchens. Cooking rice used to be a labor intensive process. This is a very interesting article about the development of the rice cooker. Very eye opening.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/rice-cooker-history

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

Thank-you, Gardengal! I had no idea that rice cookers were that old! Great article.

Japanese rice is the only kind I really like, and to me, it's candy. ;)

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bragu_DSM 5

okay, here it is ...


the rice cook along no. 47

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
l pinkmountain

Dang. I did a "how to cook rice" thread years ago. Many schools of thought as have been mentioned here. I'm usually an "in a hurry" and distracted rice cooker and my rice is usually not done well. Hubs got me an Instapot for Christmas. I've just never gotten into the habit of doing it in the oven, it doesn't seem to fit with my schedule very well. Hubs seems to do it right routinely on top of the stove. We only have the one really big Dutch oven so haven't done rice in it on the stovetop. I guess I could have gotten a cast iron rice "cocotte" (lovin' that name!) but instead we went for the multiple uses of the Instapot. Did jasmine rice last night, it was fab. Hubs made dinner and he liked that he didn't have to watch the rice so he could focus on the other parts of the meal. That would be a plus for me too. Part of my issue with stovetop rice is our nasty, nasty pulsing crap electric ceramic stove top. I like the notion that the rice cooker just heats up enough space to do the rice, very efficient. Plus it has other uses which we might enjoy. But I still love cast iron. It is just not as groovy on our pulsing stove as it should be. My cast iron pancake griddle doesn't work any better than any other pan on that crap stove. I use my Dutch oven now mostly for soups and artisan bread in the oven.

Save    
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
My Houzz TV My Houzz: Olivia Munn Thanks Mom With the Kitchen of Her Dreams
The actor hires a design professional to help update the kitchen, living and dining areas
Full Story
Life Show Us Your Thanksgiving Fails
On some holidays you are just thankful when it’s over
Full Story
Summer Gardening How to Grow Basil
Bright color, quick growth and endless uses for cooking make this summer annual a winner in the garden or a pot
Full Story
Full service Design/ Build firm with over 15 years experience in kitchens, bathrooms, interior design, furniture,... Read More