Splat - seeded bread - high hydration dough

agmss15

I added seeds to sourdough bread recently which went over very well with my mom’s household. I decided to follow a specinfix recipe to make it again.


I followed foodgeek’s recipe which adds soaked seeds to dough by lamination. It was a somewhat sticky dough that had nice gluten development. Then I added the drained soaked seeds (a mix of sesame, poppy, pumpkin and sunflower). It got positively goopily sticky. I followed the rest of the directions except I added an extra stretch/fold/rest to see if it would tighten up again. Nope. The loaves were shaped, rolled in more seeds, risen overnight in the fridge.


They rose nicely, popped easily from the bannetons (fingers had been crossed) and immediately oozed out. Luckily they didn’t really deflate. I was amused/concerned and proceeded to baked them. I ended up with two very pretty rustic uhm frisbees. Lol.


The bread is absolutely delicious. I am still learning how to handle wet wet doughs. I will definitely try again. But I can’t quite convey my mix of amusement and distress as the dough oozed out....



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wednesday morning

Treat is as a flatbread. I bet it tastes wonderful!

You can use if for open faced sandwich or just have it with some vegetables and cheese or dunk it into something wonderful.

You might find that you like it enough to do it again, just like that. Really, it looks like it would be delightful!

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nancyofnc

Sometimes our wandering gives us great results. I would eat that bread in a minute - like the whole thing!!! I love nuts and seeds, can't abide granola gunk, love sturdy bread. Looks like you found a winner - do you think you could ever repeat it????

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Lars

Looks good to me. Maybe you could transform it into a focaccia. I like seeds in bread, but not nuts, unless I'm using it for French toast.

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plllog

That does look delicious! From my own experience, it sounds like the seeds were too heavy for the dough. With white flour, you could do a couple of rises before adding the seeds. Before I had to give up whole grains, I made daily bread (daily eating, more like every five days baking), whit 100% whole wheat and whole rye, which can never have as strong gluten as refined because of the bran, but I still added 100g of seeds and similar.


The secret is a terracotta banneton. The dough rose and was baked right in it. It ended up a little funny looking, but held its rise. For this dough, i did a long preferment with the yeast and a portion of the water and flour, and soaked the seeds and the rest of the flour in the remaining water. The “soak” starts very dry, but as the water soaks in, it all becomes doughy and damper. The two are combined after at least 8 hours then set in the banneton to rise, then bake.


I think you could replicate the flatbread by doing it the same way you did. I also think it might work just soaking the seeds in the water required for the dough. Or you could try baking in a pot with the really wet dough. You don’t have to preheat it unless you want a particularly crisp crust. I'd try without preheating first, to see how the rise works. Make sure the pot is small enough in diameter to fit your loaf. If the pot isn't enamelled, do oil it first.

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annie1992

That loaf looks delicious to me, I'd eat it as it is!

I also have trouble with wet doughs "spreading out" during the rising process, even without adding nuts or seeds. As Plllog suggested, I bake mine in a cast iron pan which helps to control the spread.

I'd eat that bread in a red hot minute, though, spread or not. I still have a multi-grain dough in the refrigerator, I think I'm going to add some seeds and nuts to that one, yours looks so good.

Annie

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agmss15

@nancyofnc

I plan to make it again - though hopefully end up with a somewhat taller a loaf. I was actually following a recipe - the only tweaking I did was to expand the variety of types of seeds though not the weight.

@Lars - I tend to prefer nuts crunchy. But that said I do have a sentimental fondness for super dense whole grain bread with lots of additions. A mix of a hippie childhood and Eastern European Jewish roots...

I would love to make a sourdough focaccia. I think if I had tried to turn this into one at the last moment it would have just deflated completely. I am still getting the timing right with sourdough. It is both forgiving and demanding. And the time ranges based partly on room temperatures are huge.

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agmss15

Here is the recipe.... I like this guy’s videos. He is methodical enough for me to copy without being intimidating at all.

The bread is really good!

It was risen in a wicker banneton. I finally bought two. And baked in an enameled cast iron Dutch oven.

https://foodgeek.dk/en/seeded-sourdough-bread-recipe-easy-way-to-add-seeds-using-lamination/

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plllog

You probably just need a smaller pot. ;)

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Lars

I watched the Danish video, and I noticed that he used sourdough starter, and so I will not be able to make this bread. I also noticed a resemblance between his upper arms (early in the video) with the early dough that he was laminating/folding over. He seems a bit young to have arms like that, but maybe he lost a lot of weight.

I posted a response to his video, answering his question of what seeds I preferred. I wrote "sesame, caraway, fennel, and poppy" in that order. I also mentioned that I would omit the sunflower seeds. I like sunflower seeds as a snack - just not in bread - they are too much like nuts. BTW, I've had bread with pecans in it that I liked, and it did make very good French toast. I would also prefer chopped walnuts over sunflower seeds.

I think that once you start putting too much stuff in the bread, it is less versatile. I love olive bread, for example, but its uses are somewhat more limited. Jalapeño bread would have a lot more uses for me, however. I guess I put chilies in a lot of things, and since I do not have a crop of chocolate Habanero chilies this year, I've been using chile de arbol. I was lucky to find a lot of very fresh dried chilies at Cárdenas Market in Cathedral City.

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agmss15

@lars - I think it is funny the different things people notice. Besides a vague awareness of tattoos I didn’t really notice anything about his arms.


I do think whole grain seeded dense bread is a different creature than a loaf of challah or a baguette. I like almost all of it. But you are right they have different uses.


My mom’s cousin was in the French Resistance or maybe it should be called the Alsatian resistance. And for sometime was stuck in Russian where there was only black bread and cabbage to eat. Someone commiserated with him about this once. He very fiercely said basically black bread was a complete food. He said everything fiercely. A very difficult man but full of amazing tales. A graphic designer and artist.


Since everything reminds me of current events at the moment...


Here is a short story - my grandparents lived in NJ. My grandmother’s niece Jane and her husband Walter lived in Manhattan. Once they were coming out to a dinner party at my grandparents and gave a ride to another couple who they didn’t know. At some point during the ride he and the other guests recognized each other. He had helped them escape the nazis without knowing their names... It gave my grandmother chills to tell the story 40-50 years later.....

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CA Kate z9

The bread looks delicious! And, I'd like a slice, please.

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