Is it safe to bake a frozen pie in glass pie plate?

stacey_mb

I have a frozen apple pie in a glass pie plate which apparently should be baked from frozen to avoid sogginess. I'm concerned that if I put a frozen glass pie plate in a preheated oven that it will shatter. Have you had experience with baking frozen pies?

SaveComment15Like
Comments (15)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sherry

I haven't ever done pie, but I do frozen casseroles in pyrex. I just put them in the cold oven and turn it on. The glass gradually warms as the oven preheats.

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

The issue would be putting the frozen glass on a hot shelf. I'm sure people do it, but there's the possibility of thermal shock. It might be better on a room temp baking sheet on the hot rack, just to give it a chance. There's also the issue of condensation making the bottom of the dish damp even after you just wipe it which makes it that much more likely that it'll crack.

I generally go for a forkable, rather than friable (stiff and crackly) crust. Given that, I haven't had any issues with the crust heating mostly thawed pies (chilly but not icy), but it would be less noticeable with the more tender pastry.

Good luck!

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Fun2BHere

I wonder if you could lift the whole pie out of the glass pan and put it in a different pie pan for cooking?

1 Like Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
chloebud

"It might be better on a room temp baking sheet on the hot rack, just to give it a chance."

That is exactly what I've done after hearing it from a caterer years ago. I haven't had a problem, but I still say a little prayer each time. Just the idea of the ICE COLD glass pan going into a HOT oven. My mom had a cold Pyrex pan shatter in the oven once. Hence my little prayer, although other factors might have been involved. I doubt she used the baking sheet.

ETA - Found this from Cook's Illustrated, FWIW.

To avoid the risk of the glass shattering, we know not to put a hot Pyrex baking dish on a cold surface, but we have often recommended the opposite situation when baking pies in our favorite pie plate from Pyrex: We typically chill the dough-lined pie plate before transferring it to a preheated baking sheet, which helps ensure proper browning of the bottom crust. World Kitchen, the company that now owns the U.S. Pyrex brand, doesn’t specifically warn against such a practice, but we recently decided to confirm with them that it was safe. As it turned out, the company cautioned against putting cold (or even room-temperature) Pyrex pie plates and baking dishes onto hot baking sheets because they conduct heat so efficiently that they could shatter.

Our new recommendation is to place the pie plate on an unheated metal baking sheet before sliding it into the oven. The metal pan still helps conduct heat to the bottom of the pie but without risk of cracking the Pyrex plate since it heats up gradually. To apply this new approach to any of our existing recipes calling for a preheated sheet, bake the pie 5 to 10 minutes longer to guarantee a crisp, browned bottom. (Times will vary depending on the moisture of the filling and whether the pie has a single or double crust.)

1 Like Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sherry

I didn't think about the fact that I have old Pyrex. It is made different than the new. They changed the formula for Pyrex and Corningware a few years ago and it is not as tough as my stuff from the 70's and 80's and before.

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
laceyvail 6A, WV

Was the pie frozen in the glass pie plate or are you placing a frozen pie that has been wrapped up in a glass pie plate now? Big difference. If the latter, I don't think there will be any problem.

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Elizabeth

I have frozen fruit pies in vintage Corningware pie pans and popped them in a hot oven with no issues. I would not do that with Pyrex of any age.

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bbstx

This all reminds me of a famous-within-our-family story. My aunt and uncle somehow ended up as unexpected lunch guests at our house. Mom decided one more dish was needed in order to have sufficient food. This was pre-microwave days. She put the frozen food into a Pyrex casserole dish and stuck it in the oven to thaw/heat. After a while in the oven, she stirred the food. A still-frozen bit hit the now-hot dish and the dish shattered! I was pretty young. I remember a lot of commotion in the kitchen as she and my aunt cleaned up.

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cloudy_christine

I'd see if it can be lifted out while still frozen and put into a metal pan. If not, I would thaw it overnight in the fridge. I know you can put chilled pies in Pyrex pans straight into a hot oven since I do it all the time, but I would not try it with frozen.

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

I wonder if you set it into some hot tap water for a couple minutes to see if it will release placed upside down. Then into another safer tin. Then no worries.

Years ago I froze some leftover thanksgiving stuffing in a pyrex to have a few weeks later with a roast chicken dinner or some similar meal. Just never did that again. Way before the internet but we knew about thermal shock. Did it without thinking.

Fast forward to last summer. I put a favorite cast iron on a cheap coil single electric burner for cornbread in the workshop used for things like linseed oil for woodworking, etc. Never used for cooking but it was rainy and a chilly day. Cold cast iron, hot coils. Cracked immediately. (it was on low and not red hot) yet obviously too hot.

Soggy pie is better than no pie if it cracks.

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
stacey_mb

No shattering, my pie is a success! (Although we haven't tasted it yet! lol) I had made the pie in the glass pie plate and then froze it, and unfortunately didn't have a metal pie plate to use instead. But I felt confident this morning and before the oven was completely preheated, I put a baking sheet on the oven rack and put the pie on top.

Thanks to all for your suggestions. As an aside, I made the pie crust in a Cuisinart, an Anna Olson recipe, and it was one of the easiest I've ever worked with. The recipe didn't recommend a Cuisinart but it worked like a charm.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bbstx

SD, I thought cast iron was impervious to everything except rust!! I’m gobsmacked that your skillet cracked. 😱


All’s well that ends well, Stacey! Now I want pie!

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

Stacey, thanks for the report! So glad it worked well.

Cast iron is actually brittle. It can also crack if you drop it the wrong way. It's highly unusual for cast iron to crack, but it happens often enough.

1 Like Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
laceyvail 6A, WV

Stacey, what I have done in the past is to line the pie plate with tin foil, make the pie in it, freeze the pie, then remove the pie plate. When it's time to bake it, just remove the tin foil, place the frozen pie in the plate and bake. Works great.

Save     Thanked by stacey_mb
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
stacey_mb

That's a good tip, Laceyvail. The pie of course is frozen but the pie plate is not, making it safe for a hot oven.

Save    
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Apartment Life Warm Up Fall With an Apple Pie Party at Home
A pie enthusiast shares a recipe, ideas for pretty crusts, and tips on how she makes the most of her rental kitchen
Full Story
Kitchen Design How to Create a Dedicated Baking Station
Avid bakers love having a designated kitchen space. Here’s what to consider when planning yours
Full Story
Kitchen Design Love to Bake? Try These 13 Ideas for a Better Baker's Kitchen
Whether you dabble in devil's food cake or are bidding for a bake-off title, these kitchen ideas will boost your baking experience
Full Story
Inspiration for some backyard chats
Inspiration for a warm welcome
Inspiration for dinner time under the stars
Inspiration for a little quality time
Inspiration for making that best pizza ever
Star Floor, Inc. has been proudly serving the major metropolitan area for years. We believe in providing... Read More