Making Venison Stock

CA Kate z9

(Didn't want to hijack Annie's thread.) A nighbor asked if deer (venison) bones will make a good stock. I didn't know. Do any of you?

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annie1992

Kate, I make venison stock just like I do beef stock. If a person eats venison and likes it, they'll like the stock. Out of an abundance of caution I don't use spinal bones (body or neck) because the prions behind Chronic Wasting Disease accumulate in the spinal cord, and we are close to a CWD zone.

It wouldn't have bothered me a bit to have the other thread "hi jacked", it just makes the discussion more interesting!

Annie

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lindac92

Is chronic wasting related to Jacob Crutchfeld?

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annie1992

LindaC, Creutzfeldt-Jakob is the disorder people get when eating animals that are infected with Mad Cow disease. Chronic Wasting Disease is a prion disease in cervids related to Mad Cow, and studies are still on going, but it has been transmitted to monkeys from eating infected venison, so I'm careful. Chronic Wasting Disease was found in a farm raised deer a couple of counties away, and so testing stations have been set up for those who want to process their own deer.We have ours processed and the DNR tests heads from processing facilities regularly. No CWD has been found in the wild herd at this time. The DNR says it cannot be passed to humans eating infected meat, but there are other studies that are more concerning that say there could be a causal link. And the prions live in the ground for an unknown period of time. Sheep have a variant too, it's called scrapie.

However, it's more prevalent in counties south of us, and so you know it's going to spread. A couple of the Western States have a big problem in their deer herds. Wisconsin has managed to control the spread by culling the does and reducing the herd, at one point there you had to shoot a doe before you were allowed to shoot a buck. Now, in my area, a private land owner can get several doe "tags", in an effort to thin the herd and cull the breeding stock. The "trophy" hunters don't like it much, because they are only looking for horns to brag about, but many who actually eat what they shoot will forego the bragging rights and put a doe in the freezer, after having it tested. And deer "farms" have caused a big problem due to crowding and questionable feeding practices, trophy stock "trading" and escaped animals. I know Iowa has some cases now too.

Annie



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CA Kate z9

Thank you, Annie. I don't know anything about the bones - meaty or not; he said the butcher gave him all the bones. (The butcher was probably envisioning a large dog). And, the info on CWD was good to know and I copied that to him.

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