Cabbage? CABBAGES!!?

lindac92

I was given 2 HUGE cabbages from a friend's garden. One green and one red....huge I tell you!! Probably 7 or 8 pounds total.

now I know slaw and will likely make a big batch of slaw to share.....and stuffed cabbage but this is so large it would be difficult to separate into leaves. And boiled cabbage and braised....and sweet and sour red cabbage.....and I do sometimes put some shreds of red cabbage in a green salad for added color and crunch.

But this is a LOT of cabbage!

Hit me with some of your best, please!

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nancyofnc

Freezer Slaw. Treat the green shredded cabbage to a salt water bath for 1 hour, drain, rinse, drain. Mix with cooked and cooled dressing of cider vinegar, twice as much white sugar, black pepper, celery seed, dry mustard or bit of mustard seed, and add some shredded carrots. perhaps some finely diced sweet pepper for color, and some fine sliced onions for zip. Freeze in serving sizes (1/2 pint for 2, pint for 4, etc.) flattened in plastic zip lock bags for easiest storage. I bring out what I'll want, thaw 3 or 4 hours in fridge, then stir in mayo. I've not tried this with red cabbage.

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chloebud

I've made this soup several times. Easy to sub green cabbage for the savoy.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/ribollita-recipe-1951217

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cookebook

Here's an old cookalong thread with lots of cabbage recipes. https://www.gardenweb.com/discussions/2397380/cookalong-43-cabbage

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plllog

You could make this with some wedges off a big cabbage. It's a Molly Stevens braise, and really good.

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/member/views/best-braised-cabbage-50053321

Today, I'm hoping to get a big white cabbage into an idea I saw awhile back—salty things like parmesan put between the leaves and roasted. Making it up as I go, but I think I'll do a bed of onions, etc, like in the Stevens recipe, and brush the tops with garlic oil. That's the plan, anyway. ;)

Speaking of freezer, a tip I picked up along the way is to freeze cabbage in advance of making stuffed cabbage, which breaks it down enough that the leaves are pliable without boiling. You could just freeze part for later. It should be easier to peel off leaves after freezing, and if they're that big, half a cabbage might give you big enough leaves. Or maybe sufficient for enchilada or taquito style rolls, rather than burrito style. Harder to stack, but tastes just as good. ;)


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Jasdip

I've made Molly Stevens' braised cabbage a number of times that Plllog posted. It's delicious!

Sauerkraut!

Cabbage soup.

Egg roll in a bowl

I always have cabbage in my frig it lasts a long time and I just cut the blackened parts off.

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beesneeds

Kraut, slaws, salads, soups... stir fry, stuffing for egg rolls and egg foo young... braised or roasted in wedges. Pair it with apples and onions to do up pork roasts or chops... also goes well with smoked sausages.

I also like to dehydrate it- makes it shelf stable and is great for kicking into soups, stews, casseroles...

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Lars

I started some sauerkraut last Friday using some green cabbage that I bought. I think it is my favorite way to have cabbage, and I use the sauerkraut to make Reuben sandwiches, but I also eat it by itself.

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gardengirl37232

Colcannon is delicious!

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nancyofnc

To keep cut cabbages (and other leafy things) use a plastic or ceramic knife, especially for shredding. Stainless knives invite oxidation to brown and wilt the cut edges.

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maddielee

Roast it!



2 small cabbage heads

3 tbsp. olive oil

½ tsp. salt or to taste

2 tsp. paprika

1 tbsp. garlic powder


Cut the stems off the cabbage heads and then cut each one in half, then in half again. You should have four flat discs of cabbage that are about ¾ to 1 inch thick from each head. Place the cabbage steaks on a baking sheet that is lined with parchment paper, allowing some space between each one to even cooking.


Brush the cabbage with the olive oil, coating them thoroughly. Then generously sprinkle the salt, garlic powder, and paprika on the cabbage steaks. Flip the cabbage over and repeat, brushing them with oil and sprinkling the seasonings. Then add a pinch of red pepper flakes to each one, if desired.


Bake the cabbage steaks at 400°F for about 25 minutes, until the leaves are browned and the center is tender. Serve hot out of the oven.


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amylou321

Bubble and squeak!

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lindac92

so many good ideas! Never knew you could freeze slaw? Doesn't it get mushy?
I won't be roasting either of these whole because they are so huge....that would be way too much!
But love the idea of the unstuffed cabbage soup....will be doing that for sure, and will do some braised red sweet and sour cabbage,,,,,and some unfrozen slaw. Then I think I'll stash the rest for a week or so and move on to maybe bubble and squeak...or maybe I seek out a corned beef piece and do a boiled dinner!
Thanks Guys!

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sheilajoyce_gw

That soups sounds good. I plan to make some for lunches now that it has cooled off here.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

That was an eye-opener for me as well Linda...the freezing. I'm all over that. So worth the trials. I have two giant heads still fresh and gorgeous. Yes, it lasts for weeks in the crisper. We make kimchi and kraut fermentations but more cabbage than we will use for that.

I'll just freeze a couple flat-packs when I process for ferments. Piggy-back while I'm at it. Freezing gets tricky if we wait too long before using. We have noticed approaching a year many veg do lose freshness.

I remember someone swearing up and down about freezing ears of corn on the cob. Just like summer fresh. (I cut it off the cob and food saver). I food shrink saved two ears. So much air in the core it was awful somewhat acceptable. Maybe just a couple months frozen and used around holiday thanksgiving. Off the ear throughout the winter months and less freezer space is best for us anywho.


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chewydog

Molly Stevens braised cabbage. I make it as a side dish and the leftovers go into scalloped potatoes and ham, for extra umami.

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beesneeds

A random use for those too big/tough leaves is to use them as pan liners. I got a couple of large basketball sized heads from a local market and the outermost leaves are wonderful but still too big and spines thick for wraps. They were 3 bucks each.

I've been plunking them down in crockpot or slow in the oven cooking and filing them with whatever casserole or loaf fillings.

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lindac92

Well...i did manage to saw the smaller red cabbage head in a few pieces. And cut up half a big red onion, and a couple of small apples and vinegar and sugar....and cooked it down. had trouble keeping my fork out of it....and found a friend who would take 2/3 of it. So tomorrow I will cook more of the red and wait for a few days to tackle the green one.
The smaller one, the red one weighed 4 pounds 14 oz...

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Just got a e-mail from Misfits about a new series...link, HERE

Lots of recipe links. Chips?! 🤪 Not sure about that but I'm making some kale chips today so I'll try a little bit.

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fawnridge (Ricky)

This is a Sicilian dish my grandmother taught me

Cabbage, Cavatelli, and Sausage

Break down a large head of cabbage and put it in a large stew pot with a cup of water over low heat. As it starts to wilt, add a large bag of cavatelli, a pound of sausage that's been cut into bite-size chunks, and some hot sauce.

Simmer and stir for several hours, adding water as needed. Serve with fresh-made garlic bread.

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plllog

I weighed my cabbage just for grins, because it seems twice the size as those I've been getting. It's 4 lb. 5 oz.! Not as big as Linda's, but hefty. :) Family drama this week. I hope to be able to cook it finally, today.

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lindac92

And the other one is bigger....haven't weighed it yet.....Giant I tell you and picture perfect!

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l pinkmountain

This is a great thread because hubs and I eat cabbage every week. It's our main winter vegetable. Gonna have to try the freezer slaw. Also wondering about slicing and grilling . . . I had a recipe once, but never tried it, for grilled romaine lettuce bunches . . .

Our usual preparation outside of coleslaw is braised or stir fried. I just made the "unstuffed" cabbage roll soup, yum. Gonna have to try a colecannon type soup one of these days . . .

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plllog

Jasdip, I was looking the Cabbage soup recipe you posted since I just don't want to make cabbage rolls. It needs some acid, :) If I try it I'll add a lot of lemon juice and maybe forgo the L&P.

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antiquesilver

I'm going to try the unstuffed cabbage roll soup, too since it's an all day affair to make the rolls; if I recall my regular recipe calls for red wine as part of the braising liquid so I'll add some of that as well.


EDIT: I found my recipe & it calls for WHITE wine, not red.

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plllog

I finally made the cabbage dish. I didn't have a recipe, just an idea I'd heard somewhere, so I kind of cribbed a lot from the Molly Stevens braise, which is a standard for me. I did learn that it needs more stuff than I used (I added it to the ingredients, but it was all eaten up. :) I thought it was delicious.

Layer-stuffed Cabbage

1 nice tight white or green standard cabbage, about 2 lb., wedged
5-6 oz., approx., sliced prosciutto (thin, salty, tasty). I use domestic humane. A crime to use the best of Parma for this.
1 small block (inch slice off the wheel or wedge, about half a pound) of good Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, 18 mo. is fine.
1/2 cup Cuban citrus garlic sauce, or 1/2 cup garlic infused and seasoned chicken stock with a little lemon juice
1 fat carrot
1 baseball sized yellow onion
Olive oil

Choose a baking dish that will fit your cabbage wedges. They can be packed in tightly. Oil generously with olive oil (cooking quality, not your best EVOO). Preheat to 330° F (or so).

Cut cabbage into enough wedges so everybody gets one. Wide on the outside, and not too deep into the middle of the cabbage works really well, but however it comes out should be fine.

Use a madoline or slicing blade to slice the onion paper thin (.5 mm), the carrot and cheese card thin (1.3 mm). Chop the last bits of the veg and throw into the bottom of the dish, with some of the slices.

Gently separate the leaves of each wedge, keeping them stacked together. Layer the leaves with the prosciutto, onions, carrots and cheese. Be generous. Reserve a slice or two of the prosciutto and a little of everything else for the top.

Place the layered wedges in the dish, scatter the reserved ingredients over the top, and pour the garlic sauce around. Drizzle with olive oil.

Bake at 330° F (or so) for an hour, covered with tucked but not tight foil. After the hour, carefully remove the foil (in case something sticks) and bake another half hour to hour until the cabbage is at your desired tenderness. A berry spoon works well for serving.

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