Differences in Bread Making

CA Kate z9

I do not have a bread machine and don't plan on getting one. So, here's my question: what is the difference(s) in a recipe for a bread machine vs. by hand?

There is a recipe for rye bread that I would like to try, but it says its for a bread machine. How can I make it without a machine?


RECIPE: My Grandmother's Swedish Rye Bread (for bread machines)

gardener365May 23, 2013

Hello, I'd like to share what my mom has been making for years from a recipe she reduced from her mothers Swedish Rye Bread Recipe:
Re-post from 2007: for reason being that water wasn't added to one of the steps:

Grandma Wongstrom's Rye Bread
Serving Size: 1 Preparation Time : 4:00
Categories Breads

10 ounces water
1 tablespoon butter
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons white sugar
1/4 cup Brer Rabbit light molasses (she says non-light tastes the same but her mother says, "the non-light!" in a joking manner she said to me)
1/2 cup rye flour, 100% rye
2 3/4 cups white bread flour
1 1/2 teaspoons bread yeast

Place butter, salt, white sugar, molasses, and water in a glass bowl and microwave for 90 seconds. Remove, stir ingredients, and place in bread maker pan.

Place rye and white bread flour on top of liquids. Make a hole in center of flour and place the bread yeast in it. This part I don't understand because I was over and made a loaf and all we did was mix the rest of the ingredients together and toss them in the bread machine.

Set your controls for 1 1/2 pound loaf and medium crust (or whatever you prefer).

She had to order the rye flour from Hodgson Mills in Effingham, IL she says. She also references that, "it is difficult... to find in (our) local grocery stores."

It's really fantastic, so give it a try. She also waits two hours for it to cool.

Enjoy Please! You'll never want to eat anything else. Mom had a chunk with her homemade vegetable soup and said the experience was super!

Take care,

Dax

SaveComment20Like
Comments (20)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

Bread machines use instant yeast, and a lot of it. They also put the ingredients in a different order to acomodate the way the machine works. Plus, the batch is sized for what fits in the machine. You can convert it. It's late and someone here is sure to be better at it than I, so I'm not doing it now. Hodgson Mills is still around, though their retail store is gone. I think you could substitute and small mill, or home milled, rye. Anyway, you could substitute active dry yeast, follow the ingredients, and assemble and rise as you would any bread, and you should have good bread. :). Good luck.


1 Like Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindac92

Piece of cake....(tee hee).
Warm the water to baby bath temperature.....about body temp or a little warmer....

Add the yeast and unless you are using bread machine yeast I would use 2 teaspoons of yeast....but whatever it will work just take a little longer to rise.
And add the sugar to the yeast and water.....and when it bubbles and gets foamy, about 5 minutes add about cup of the white flour and stir until lumps are gone....then add the butter and molasses and salt and stir....add the rye flour and stir......and add the rest of the white flour a little at a time and when it gets too stiff to stir, put it on a floured board and knead. Knead it for 7 to 10 minutes, adding a very little flour to the board as you go....a little as you need so it doesn't stick...
Put into an oiled bowl, cover bowl with saran or a lid and allow to rise until it's double...about 1 1/2 hours...maybe more if your kitchen is cool.
Punch it down....turn it over in the bowl and punch it so it deflates, cover and allow ti rise again.
Then shape into loaves and allow to rise until double and bake at 375 for about 40 minutes or until the interior measures 200 with an instant read thermonmeter at thec enter of the loaf.
This will make one very large loaf....it's intended for a bread machine....I would make 2 free form loaves and put them on a baking sheet well dusted with corn meal. Cover with saran sprayed with Pam while the rise.....and slash tops before baking....or not!!

Yummy!!!

2 Likes Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Marilyn_Sue

I like using my bread machines, it does all the kneading and warm place to rise. I don't use the baking part of it very often. I make more yeast rolls than bread. I have Kitchen Aid stand mixers I could use, but like my bread machine better. I am physically unable to knead bread by hand. Your recipe sounds very good.

Sue

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Lindac92 said what I was going to suggest! I will say this, though... If your kitchen is drafty/chilly like mine is, I put a pot of water on the stove to heat on a low setting, then turn my oven on to its very lowest setting just before I start mixing all my ingredients then as soon as it is up to temp I turn the oven off but keep the pot of water heating. Once I am done kneading and the dough is in the oiled bowl and covered, I put the pot of water in the now barely-warm oven and then put the dough in to rise. The bread I make only requires 1 rise before shaping into loaves so I do not reheat anything before putting the loaves back in to rise - I do pull them out before heating the oven to bake. With 2 risings before making loaves you might need to reheat the water. I actually leave the pot of water in the oven while baking the bread but for the rye bread it might not be necessary. And of course if your kitchen is warm enough to let the bread rise on the counter then I am jealous LOL.

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
CA Kate z9

Thank you for all the help. I would never have guessed on the double-rise, Linda, or the extra yeast.

Edie, unfortunately my kitchen isn't very warm right now so the rising technique will be a help.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shambo

I use bread machine recipes and regular bread recipes interchangeably. Like Marilyn Sue, I use my machine for kneading and rising and then bake in the oven. However, on hot summer days when I’d rather not turn on my oven, I’ll bake a loaf in the machine. But I never use instant yeast, always active dry. I agree with Linda about the amount of yeast. The recipe you posted uses over 3 cups of flour, and most recipes with that much flour call for a packet of yeast (2-1/4 tsp). FWIW, most bread machines only have 2 rises altogether.

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

One of the difference between doing it by hand or by machine:


Typically the pan in a bread machine is electrically heated to be very warm to help dough rise.


dcarch

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindac92

I put a cup of water in a 2 cup pyrex measure into my microwave and run it on high for a minute....then put my bowl into the micro with the cup of hot water to rise when my kitchen is too cool.
You could make the bread with only one rise, but it will have a better taste and texture with two.

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bragu_DSM 5

micro-proofing | precisely what I was going to suggest .... just don't forget the bowl in the micro ... it can make a mess


ask me how I know

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ediej1209 AL Zn 7

I can't do the microwave rising as DH uses it constantly to reheat his never-ending coffee. And even using the oven I have to put a sign on the oven controls to not turn it on. You can probably guess why LOL.

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindac92

If your kitchen is really cool....like under 68, try putting the bowl on a heating pad set on low....or put it in the sunshine coming in a window....if there is any :(

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

Or start a big load of towels before you begin, and set your bowl on the dryer to rise. Used timed dry and it'll serve as a check indicator too. If you need more heat and don't have a heating pad, warming drawer, etc., there's the modern answer to setting your bowl over the pilot light--the cable box. Yeast loves it! You can also just do a pot of water on the stove on low with the bread bowl on top, but that makes me nervous about leaving it, especially if there's an open flame.

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Plllog, that's one thing I miss about the old old gas stoves - the pilot light. With these new electronic ignitions not only do we not have a constant slightly warm spot, but if we lose power we can't manually turn on the stove with a match.

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindac92

I can manually light my gas stove with a match if I lose power.

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
plllog

A lot of new style stoves do have a way to circumvent the gas cutoff, but you have to learn how to do it before you lose power! Even if it has a solenoid, I think there's a way around it. Maybe ask in the appliances forum.

1 Like Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m


For those of you who don't mind tinkering, this is what I use for bread making. (I keep my house around 65F in winter).


A $10 aquarium temperature controller, a 30 watt light bulb, a $5 small fan, and $5 of Home Depot foam board. About 1/2 hour of construction using duct tape. I got myself a precision digital temperature chamber to do bread rising. Perfect control for all recipes.


I use the same chamber for making yogurt, in gallons, for ripening fruits, for seed starting. I don't raise chickens (not yet), great for incubating eggs also.


Last year, I tried something new, I used the chamber to control timing of blossoming for amaryllis bulbs (My posted on a separate thread) for a 2019 12/31 New Year party, success!


dcarch




1 Like Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
CA Kate z9

I have a little coffee-cup-sized heating plate on my desk. I wonder how well it would work if placed under the rising bowl. Hmmmmmmm. An experiment is in order.

(you all have my mind working on new solutions.)

And, I even found a bag of Bob's Red Mill Rye flour in the freezer. Tomorrow's baking day, I think.


2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nancyofnc

I have floor vents for heating in the winter so i put my bowl of dough on a chair and put it just off center of the vent, and - it is free. For the summer I cover the bowl with a kitchen towel and put it under the covered porch to rise, and - it is free.

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
annie1992

I also use bread machine recipes and regular recipes interchangeably, letting the machine do the kneading, then I shape, rise and bake in the oven.

I would proceed exactly like LindaC, be sure to knead well. My kitchen in White Cloud was very cool, I kept the thermostat on 55F, and I used to turn on the oven light and put the bowl in there. The light created enough heat to get a rise, although somewhat more slowly than I sometimes wanted. In those instances I turned the oven on to the lowest setting, which was 170F, let it heat for a few minutes until my oven thermometer said 85 or 90F, then turned the oven off, left the light on, and stuck the dough in there. I lost a bit of heat when I opened the door to put the bowl in, so that worked pretty well.

The recipe sounds good, I'm going to have to pick up some rye flour and make some, thanks!

Annie

Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ediej1209 AL Zn 7

The reason I have to include a pan of water is this house sucks all the moisture out of everything. I couldn't get dough to rise for love nor money, not even KAF roll mix, so I contacted them for help. The nice lady that took my call spent almost an hour with me while she walked through how I did everything and finally she came to the conclusion that lack of warmth and hydration were the culprits. I added the water and oven rising and haven't had any issues since. (Side note: KAF customer service people are fantastic!)

1 Like Save     Thanked by CA Kate z9
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Remodeling Guides 8 Little Remodeling Touches That Make a Big Difference
Make your life easier while making your home nicer, with these design details you'll really appreciate
Full Story
Houzz Tours Houzz Tour: Details Make the Difference in 700 Square Feet
Thoughtfully chosen furnishings, accessories and artwork turn a plain San Francisco condo into a place to call home
Full Story
Accessories Single Design Moves That Make All the Difference
One good turn deserves a whole ideabook — check out these exceptional lone moves that make the room
Full Story