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satine_gw

Retired??

satine_gw
12 years ago

Hi all. I am contemplating retiring soon and Im a bit uneasy. I will be ok financially if Im careful but I am concerned that I might be bored. I will admit I am not a very motivated person (aka lazy) or a goal setter. I am really tired of the long commute to work and being so tired over the weekend that nothing gets done. I don't have any real hobbies other than reading. I would get to spend more time with my grandkids since they live just far enough away that I can't get there during the work week. Before you retired did you have hobbies or volunteering? This is a scarey time and I am trying to weigh all the pros and cons. I moved about a year ago and really don't know anyone in my new community. Where to start?????

Comments (30)

  • Marilyn Sue McClintock
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I really can't speak for myself, but I have a couple relatives that have retired and they are busy or busier as they were when they worked a full time job. There is always something to do. For most of my married life I have been a stay at home housewife and I have more work than I can keep up with. I am 76. Good luck with your retirement.

    Sue

  • jannie
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I retired in 2005. I've always had plenty of hobbies and not enough time. Crafts, painting, embroidery,reading, knitting. Considser taking adult ed classes in tune with your interests. I took Ebay classes, sold a few things online, but it's too much work for little profit. Join a book discussion club at the library. I also volunteer at my town's animal shelter. I have two pets (dog and cat) who keep me busy. I try to schedule one fun activity a week with DH. Movie, concert, lunch or dinner out. I love retirement-free to schedule things during the day, not just on evenings and weekends.

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  • oldgardener_2009
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I'm in the same situation as you, and I'm leaning towards not retiring. I can't imagine not working and not having that security, losing my job skills over time and not contributing as much money to the household.

    Not having a structured day leaves me hanging, wasting time fiddling around not accomplishing anything important. I need to be productive.

    If DH were to retire as well and we both liked to travel, that would be different, but I'm not a good traveler and have no interest in that. DH loves to work and has no plans to retire, so I don't see any real reason for me to retire unless my health goes south.

    If I were to retire, I know I'd feel like I'd have to keep a perfectly spotless house because I'd have the time and no excuse not to, so basically I'd retire just to become a better housekeeper.

  • wanda_va
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I was a workaholic--worked 60-80 hours per week. I retired early because DH has MS and working was getting to be too hard for him, and we wanted to be together. All my colleagues predicted that I would be back to work in 8-9 months, due to boredom. Some of them even called and offered me jobs during the first year!

    It took me almost 10 minutes to adjust to freedom!! Seriously! No more alarm clocks, no long commutes, no meetings, no stress. I immediately felt a huge weight lift from my shoulders. In retrospect, I truly believe that I would have had a stroke or heart attack if I had kept going at that pace for much longer. I didn't realize how much stress there was, until it was gone.

    I have now been retired for 17 years (I am 63), and can't imagine ever working again. I love the freedom of retirement. I took up quilting, which has become an addiction for me; I have time to do what I want to do, at my own pace. I can do my chores or run errands when I'm in the mood, rather than on a set schedule. I have time to play on my computer, watch TV, and still get my housework done. To me, retirement is freedom...and it is wonderful!

  • minnie_tx
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    My advice having been retired for a while is to keep busy. Try to get some structure in your life and some kind of activity where you are forced to get out of the house and go some place whether a Sr Center, Church, exercise classes or part time job.
    Being retired will let you enjoy some of the benefits of being able to cruise, travel etc or just do what you want but in the long run IMHO it is best to keep busy if no hobbies go to some clases and develop some.
    And be sure there are some people that you can have daily conversations with

  • azzalea
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Having been a SAHM/W for the past 30 years, I simply cannot imagine how anyone finds the time to work 40 hours a week! There is always SO much to do. Stuff around the house--beside the usual cleaning, I garden, do most of the interior (and some of the exterior) painting, preserving fruits and vegetables for future use, make all my own curtains, some of my own rugs, look after my older relatives, etc

    Hobbies--reading, sewing, quilting, knitting, competitive cooking, treasure hunting, watching wildlife,

    Outside of the house--writing columns for the local newspaper, volunteering, socializing with neighbors. Getting to know my new community.

    As to being in a new place? The answer to that, is the answer to your question--'what will I do with my time'. Get active in your new community. EVERY city and town has openings for volunteers. You have skills and interests that someone would be happy to make use of. By doing that, not only will you be helping out, BUT you'll be getting to meet others who share your interests, and you'll start making your new location your new home. In my case, with my interest in cooking, I found an opportunity at the newspaper--I was invited to join the food board--a group of women who are mostly amateur cooks who write articles of general interest regarding food. I've made wonderful new friends that way. I've also made it a quest to drive around my new area, learning the roads, the stores, the other opportunities there. Actually, just Sunday, DH was saying, "You know this area so much better than I do"--because he's still working and doesn't spend as much time in the country as I do. If you don't know where to start looking for opportunities, FIRST assess your interests and skills, then, here are a few ideas--I'm sure you can add many of your own: grade schools always welcome guests to come in and read or share a special hobby with the kids; Animal shelters need people to help with the pets and to help with fundraising; the courts have many volunteer opportunities; zoos and museums; Ronald McDonald House; local AIDS baby hospice; Guide dog training facilities need puppy raisers; scouting/4-H always need volunteers; hospitals; libraries; law enforcement; senior centers; boys/girls clubs..... anything strike your interest yet?

  • LuAnn_in_PA
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    "Having been a SAHM/W for the past 30 years, I simply cannot imagine how anyone finds the time to work 40 hours a week! "

    Me too!
    SAHM since 1983 and have full hectic days!

  • mboston_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I retired from teaching kindergarten (22 years) in '05. It honestly took me about 6 months to unwind and to be able to actually sit down to watch a movie without feeling that I had to have something in my lap to do while watching it. I started excerising and overdid it - actually ended up with two damaged shoulders. Pilates 5 days a week was'nt such a good idea. Like you, most of my friends were still working and except for volunteering once a week at my former school, I didn't have anything I had to do. I got very lonely and spent alot of time by myself. I finally got a part time job tutoring and then the following year got involved with some testing programs that were done a couple times a year. That brought me together with some other teachers that I used to work with. That has continued on each year but is now completed. Even though it wasn't but for a couple months a year, it really helped me stay mentally challenged.
    That was the one thing that scared me. I now read quite a bit, although in spurts. I also now have a grandson that I take care of twice a week so that keeps me physically busy and mentally sharp as I work with him on different concepts and vocabulary wise - he is far advanced for a two year old cause all of us adults around him explain what words mean to him.

    I also go to Senior Aerobics now that my shoulders are repaired. Its still high impact enough to raise your heart rate but we don't use risers so it doesn't hurt your knees or ankles. Other days I walk on the treadmill at the same center so I do it all a total of 4 times a week.

    I have hobbies - mostly butterfly gardening and in the winter hummingbirds are here to watch so I keep my plants in good shape.

    I am learning to play Bunko and relearning Bridge - although that will be a challenge mentally. Never could keep up with who had what cards.

    Before you retire - try to find a place in your area that has lessons for things you like to do - even if you never have done them - try things like line dancing, some kind of physical activity and get involved first. Then it will be easier to do when you quit working. Your local library may have book clubs you can join.

    You can only clean house so much, shop so much while staying on a budget, and watch TV without going crazy. You will need interaction with other people and to be challenged mentally to stay alert. In a way, I wish I hadn't retired for a couple more years but I had had 5 years of children who needed more help than I could provide for them in the normal classroom and emotionally I was exhausted. I probably would have been better off changing grade levels or finding a different position but I loved what I was doing and couldn't see myself in any other place.

  • pris
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Structure, smucture. I had my first outside job at age 14 and didn't stop for the next 51 years. No time for hobbies or travel. Even then I retired because arthritis had become too severe to perform my job efficiently. My boss would have kept me on as long as I wanted to show up but I felt I was taking advantage. Little did I know that stress was a major contributor to the pain I was having. Since retirement that pain is pretty much under control and I'm a much happier person. Free to go where and when I please. Free to garden, sew and develop hobbies if I so choose. Free to take an afternoon nap with my fur babies AND, free to NOT do housework if I choose to. It's never too late to learn a new skill. I taught myself to crochet at an early age but had not picked it up in years. I made afghans for all my female family members for birthdays and Christmas last year. I'm thinking of teaching myself to knit. Choices!! That's what I have now. Hmmm. I wonder if I can teach myself another language?

  • satine_gw
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Thanks for all of your ideas. Some I have already considered and others are new. Marilyn Sue I had to giggle when I read your post. I think maybe you missed my aka in my post (lazy).There is no way I could do half of what you do each day.
    I live alone and I really am not that concerned with housework. I never felt my floors need to be clean enough to eat from since I am a dishaholic! I know that my daughter wants me to volunteer and her daughters' schools at leas once a month. I used to volunteer at Hospice in the office and may look into that again. Again, thanks for all the ideas. Satine

  • oldgardener_2009
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I forgot to mention that, if I do retire, I'll still work part time so I don't start wandering around aimlessly without purpose. Volunteering regularly would serve the same purpose, of course.

    I know some people don't mind not having structure in their day, but it drives me bonkers not having a schedule of some sort...guess I'm a worker bee at heart. :)

  • marie_ndcal
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    We were able to travel alot in a RV all over US and Canada. My DH learned how to build computers. He also could fix anything, Now with health issues, he still fixes computers, only for family, still travel, only this time in a car, I have so much to do that nothing gets done. As to traveling, look at local day tours thru either a travel agency or the Auto Club. There are some 2-3 day tours also. Many senior centers sponsor trips also. We just did a 2 day tour where the only thing we had to pay for was the motel room Our Senior club paid the rest.
    There are other tours also thru other agencies and if a person does not have a spouse--no problem.
    Lots of hobbies to learn. Watch the paper for adult classes. Even Parks offer free/low cost classes. I am sure you will find something to do.

  • nicole__
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I tried retiring. I did all the catching up on: reading, movies, learned upholstery, re-planted the flower garden, fixed fancier meals.....then I was done. I had all this time on my hands, no motivation to do anything.....so I got a job. :0) If it's slow at work we can go home. So it's not a job where they rely on me. I'm not on call. They have great benefits, great pay, potlucks.....yes....I missed the social life I had when I worked. :0) Family is not the same as interacting with people my own age or people with the same interests.

  • susie53_gw
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Think of all the new things you can try. Start jotting down some things you may be interested in.. You may be surprised in what comes to mind. Some days you may find yourself doing absolutely nothing and that is ok.. Consider yourself lucky you have the means to retire. So many never get that opptunity.. I am always looking around the corner for something new..

  • glenda_al
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Took early retirement at age 54, turning 72 this summer, and absolutely no regrets.

    Teacher burnout for me, after 30 1/2 years. It was my time to retire.

    Nice retirement plan, so I'm ok.

    I did do volunteer work for a while, and then worked as a courier, but decided I just wanted to do what and when I wanted to do, so I got involved in morning exercise group, we became very social, made lots of friends, and there you go!

  • joyfulguy
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Many good suggestions here.

    I've heard many retirees say that they're so busy that they don't know how they ever found time to go to work.

    I have a suggestion for old gardener - please don't lay on yourself the almost impossible burden of setting a standard that you'd have to keep an (almost) spotless house.

    Relax a bit - feel free to take the time to do whatever suits your fancy.

    You'll be free then - free to choose what you want to do.

    You are the boss - not your house!

    The house'll be around when you choose to move ... sell it ... or whatever.

    Some farmer friends whose farm, including house, was important to them, have retired, and sold their farm and I felt that they'd want to stay in the house for a long time.

    But each has had to deal with some illnesses in the past year or so, and they told me the other day that they're moving to an apartment in a seniors' complex in a nearby village in a few months: I was quite surprised.

    Things - are things. Not people.
    __________________

    I hope that, if you're giving some thought to retirement, you'll relax as you consider it and think through the various options.

    Don't be afraid of it: it brings many opportunities, that you can make into wonderful ones, with a little effort and willingness to be a bit innovative.

    My ex- had been second head for a time, then head of the food service in a substantial mental hospital nearby.

    When they talked of closing that or a similar one in a nearby city, she chose to take early retirement.

    She had ten years to enjoy life, including taking her RV to Florida around Christmas, then travelling over to Texas, and Arizona, when our daughter lived there, returning about mid march ... which she, having grown up in Iowa and spent some time in university in New York, enjoyed, having kept her citizenship.

    She had hobbies and a number of friends and interests ... she had a ball, her kids report, for about ten years.

    Then, ironically, she, who'd fed millions over the years in hospital food service ... contracted colon cancer.

    When she died, seven years ago this month ... our kids said that, as she was 66, in the ordinary course of things, she'd have retired the year before ...

    ... and I added that she'd have been ill through most of that time.

    As it was - she'd had 10 years to enjoy life greatly: to have, as the young ones said, " ... a ball!"!!

    Who ever said, on their deathbed, that they wished that they'd spent more time with their nose to the grindstone called employment?

    ole joyfuelled

  • oldgardener_2009
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Some people enjoy working. I always have, and my husband does too; he can't wait to jump out of bed in the morning and get to work, so I can understand some people not wanting to retire.

    If I hated my job, I'd retire in a flash but since I enjoy it, it's a big decision and not an easy one to make. I have to give it a lot of thought.

    I know my work ethic, and that ethic would become a need to keep a spotless house. I'm hopeless, I know. LOL

    Still thinking on it.

  • lazypup
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I was forced to retire at 62 due to health issues. At the time I had no real hobbies or interests but like you I was sorely afraid that a rocking chair would be my undoing. After giving it considerable thought it came to me that back in the late 60's and early 70's I had been seriously into photography both as an amateur and semi-pro. I thought if I was to just get a descent camera perhaps I could start getting out and about a bit. I started out with a simple Hewlitt Packard point & shoot digital but once I had a camera in my hands it all started coming back to me. I quickly realized that a point & shoot camera just did not offer me the type of creative control I wanted, but have you priced a top line professsional Digital Single Lens Reflex lately? $1K for a camera and $500 to $1000 each for lenses, no way, at least not on my budget.

    Someone tipped me off to the Goodwill Industries online auction so I started watching that. Within a week I bought a Pentax film SLR with 4 lenses for a whopping $35, then I found another Pentax camera with 3 lenses for about $24. I stasrted shooting film but film is getting difficult to find and finding a processor without mailing it off is even more difficult. Somehow I needed to step into the Digital world, but where would I get that kind of money?

    One night I was sitting here browsing through the camera ads and something really caught my eye. Pentax has maintained what they call reverse engineering. While they have continually stayed on the cutting edge of technology and in many cases introducing the new features, they have done it in such a way that no matter what new DSLR you buy, you can still use any Pentax lens ever made on the new camera. With that in mind I then bought a used Pentax entry level DSLR body for $250 and I began by using the 7 lenses I had acquired for the film cameras. Before long I found a 10.2mp Pentax K10d with a 100-300mm auto focus lens for $275 on ebay. With that camera I had stepped up to a true professional quality camera.

    At first I just started taking short walks around home, sometimes in the woods, sometimes in the meadows, shooting birds, wildlife, flowers and whatever else came to view. What did it matter, the camera will take up to 750 shots on one 4gb SDHC card, and once the photos are transferred to the computer you erase the card and start over so there was no film & processing cost. On top of that, the batteries are rechargeable so I could shoot as many photos as I wanted and not worry about cost.

    At first I had no car so I got a monthly pass for the city buss system. With that I could board a buss at the corner and just go where ever the spirit moved me, shooting sights all over the county.

    A year later I moved in with my GF and I got her interested in photography as well, ao I use one camera and she uses the other and we take day trips, which we call our "photo walkabouts."

    I then took a map and drew three circles at 25, 35 & 50 mile radius from our house, then I sat down at the computer and started making lists of all the historical sites or points of interest within those circles. As I put a site on the list I also noted their hours and what their entrance fee was. It was late in the fall when I started the list so I also listed sites that were indoors and outdoors so we could see the outdoor sites when the weather was nice and the indoor sites during the winter.

    Jan and I have been doing this since last August and we have been to over 100 sites so far, and we still have another 150 or more on the list, not to mention a few that we like to go back to occassionally.

    This has really become a very inexpensive and fun project. Generally all we need is a couple gallon of gas in the car, a big thermos of coffee and maybe a $10 bill if the target charges an admission, but mostly we go to the free sites..LOL.

    Since we started this project we have been printing our photos 4x6 and8x10, then dry mounting them and hanging them on the living room wall. So far we have two walls full and when ppl come to the house and see them, they say they had no idea there were so many things to see so close by.

    The only problem we have now is that there are not enough hours in a day to allow us to see all the places we have picked out.

  • Jodi_SoCal
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I'd love to retire simply to have more time for hiking, traveling and doing stuff around the house. Stuff that I've put off for many, many years simply because I don't have but maybe 5-6 hours per weekend (if even that) to get stuff done. I would dearly love to organize all my photos, reread all my love letters from DH, auction off my old collectibles on eBay.

    Unfortunately, my career choice is deadline and project-driven and had I known what a time and energy drainer being a designer is, I would have chosen a different course in life. At least I say that but coming from two parents and two grandparents that were artists, I think it's hardwired in me.

    And then there's the health insurance need. And the need for money. And the need to feel wanted, needed and indispensable, part of something bigger. Hmmm, doesn't look like I'll be retiring any time soon. :-(

    I'm 58 and most of my friends and neighbors are retired and it just kills me that they are out right now, sipping wine, chatting with people in their livingroom and not on a computer, or playing tennis (DH included) and I'm stuck in the office on a perfectly perfect day to hike.

    Sorry, I guess I needed to vent. LOL

    Carry on.

    Jodi-

  • Marcia Thornley
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I wish I could say I was retired. I lost my job in October. I've not found anything yet and I'm really getting used to being at home. I love it. It took me about 2 months to get used to. I get up every morning now, grab the dog and go for a 5 km walk. Then if the weather is good we go to the beach and the dog has a swim. In the afternoon I put the bike on the car and take it down to the canal and ride for an hour on the bike path. My days fly by now. I'm thinking a part-time job would suit me fine. I like having time to do the things I enjoy!

  • linda_in_iowa
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I retired at 65 in 2007 after having worked full-time from when I was 20 until I 59. I worked 3/4 time until I was 65. I moved from CA to Iowa in 2005. I joined a church and 2 Red Hat groups, and now I deliver Meals on Wheels and volunteer one afternoon a week at the front desk of the hospital here. I also take classes for senior citizens at the university. I live alone and my 3 cats keep me company. I know so many people in town that when I go grocery shopping I usually run into someone I know. In the summer I take water aerobics twice a week and in the winter I have season tickets to the university womens basketball games with a group of 10 friends. I also babysit several times a week with friends baby. I never knew retirement could be so much fun. I go to bed when I want and I sleep in most mornings. I don't worry too much about housework. I also quilt and I joined a Kiwanis group a few months ago.

  • satine_gw
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Wow, thank you all for your responses. It sounds like for the most part you are all enjoying your retirement. I agree that it is difficult to do anything on the weekends-just not enough time and it sure would be nice to have the luxury of shopping etc during the weekdays. I guess I have alot of things to consider. I don't dislike my job (it is just really boring) and I have some wonderful funny coworkers whom I would miss but the commute is long and the days even longer. Thanks again. Satine

  • ruthieg__tx
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    My husband drove me crazy because he thought he was going to be bored. He even talked about finding a "small" job. He stays so busy and occupied that I don't know when the time goes. He is enjoying life so much and just yesterday we were talking about what a wonderful stage of life we are in. Most people who grimace at being 72 but I have always said that every stage of my life has been wonderful.......that's overall. I have had the same issues as everyone else but you put your big girl panties on and deal with it......We are just loving life.....Retired..Yes!

  • Georgysmom
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    You said you just moved about a year ago. Check to see if there is a Newcomer's Club or Welcome Wagon group in your area. It's a great way to meet new people. Generally they have groups that go out to lunch, visit museums, play cards, etc. Or maybe a Women's Club...they do projects for the community as well as getting to know women in your area to socialize with. Of course, there's plenty of opportunities to volunteer. Meals on Wheels, your local hospital, etc. There's much to keep you busy out there. Also, you might find a temp job locally to cut down on the travel you dislike. Good luck, whatever you decide.

  • rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I'll second the suggestion to take adult classes! I used to teach a series of horticulture courses at our local university and those folks were a riot! Once you get one course under your belt, you'll likely be bitten by the bug forever. Friendships were kindled in those classes.

  • jemdandy
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Some things to do:

    1. Shut off the alarm clock.

    2. Make a list of all the places you'd like to see in the US, and then prioritize those. Selec the top few plan to go there. Prime sightseeing place are National Parks. Take a camera.

    3. Long forgotten relatives: You can visit relatives and friends you have not seen in years and get re-aquainted. Combine a trip to their house with sightseeing along the way.

    4. Take up a hobby: This may require several tries until you find someting you like. Consider genealogy. Genealogy and visiting relatives are good fits.

    During my working life, I had regarded genealogy as something dull and and something my old unmarried aunt might pursue. Not so! You'll find that you will have to develop your best dectective skills to be good at it. When you visit relatives, they can be very helpful and it gives you a reason to search out family reunions. Tracing my family tree has become a lesson in early US history and the development of this country. I hated history when I was in grade school, but it becomes a facinating subject when you begin to connect you family tree with historical events. For example, I discovered that I had an ancestor who owned a 420 acre plantation in Virginia when it was a colony in the 1700s; Five of his grandsons were in the Revolutionalry War; In the next generation, one of them fought under Andrew Jackson in the Florida War, and then later was a Captain in the Black Hawk War in Illinois. Another served in the Mexican War (1846-1848). This was a lot of military action for a family who waw not militarily inclined, but were mostly farmers and settlers.

    5. Volunteering is good. You do have to be careful, though, because you no longer will have a corporation and their lawyers to stand between you and law suits. I found a number of organizations in my area who were looking for people to provide transporation, but were not insuring your activity. The repurcussions can be large, for example, suppose you are transporting a juvenille and another vehicle crashes into your car injuring or killing your passenger. In this suit-happy environment, you will need good insurance to cover the situation.

    6. Inquire at your local hospital. These often have need of volunteer help.

    7. If you are qualified, consider substitue teaching.

    8. If you belong to a religious orgaization, now is your chance to pay back by fulfilling a needed service.

    9. Handy with tools? Consider working with "Habitat for Humanity".

    10. Have single relative with a child nearby? Consider baby sitting the young one a few days a week.

    11. Have an elderly or disabled neighbor? Offer to clear their sidewalk of snow in the winter.

    12. Become a Boy Scout Leader.

    13. Join your local Lion's Club.

    14. And then, there are self improvement courses at your local vocational/Trade School. You might find that you are qualified as instructor for some of these. If you have completed college level courses in Calculus on the way to your degree, very likely, you can teach a variety of math classes at a vocational school.
    ***********

    You do have the choice to take it easy for 6 months while you explore and think about what you would like to do. Yeah, you can take 6 months off. Your main problem will be to maintain your physical well being. Do not lay around during a slack period; Do enough physical activity to stay in shape.

    Somewhere along the way, you may come to the realization that this is God given opportunity, and now you have a chance to do someting with your life other than put food on the table. Now is the chance to view your existence from a different perspective and act accodingly.

    Get bored - Nah!

  • kayjones
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    You could work part time at the IRS processing center in your area - they hire older and retired folks. You work from November to June and file unemployment the rest of the year. You can work as much as you want.

    Real Estate offices hire older folks, too, so if you are too bored, consider taking a small part time job.

  • jannie
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    There was an article on Retirement in today's paper. Now that people are living longer and in better health, you have to consider yo'll need something to do for about 20 years. Consider a "second" career. If you have a hobby, can it become job? Volunteering can lead to regular employment. I can easily see a teacher becoming a librarary employee, or a docent (guide in a museum,etc).
    Follow your interests. If you like knitting, perhaps a job in a craft store.

  • cardamom
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Many good suggestions already given. Part time work in or near your home will fill part of your time and a chance to meet new people.

    Since you're a reader, your library probably has a Friends of the Library volunteer group or a bookclub. That's how I became involved and then was appointed to our library board. Interested in learning more about your community and giving back, then see what city commissions or volunteer groups might fit your interests. See what goes on at your city council meetings.
    Main thing is , take your time deciding and explore some of these before making your final decision .

    Good

  • joyfulguy
    12 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Hi again satine,

    What is it about "freedom" ...

    ... that you find so disconcerting?

    On the day that you leave work, you have another job: to find ways to make life something of an adventure, more interesting ... and fun!

    No - that "job" starts right now.

    Think of all of the interesting and wonderful things that are there in this world, just waiting for you to become involved?!

    I'd heard that most U.S. folks love freedom.

    Some folks in North Africa have shown us lately that they'd like more - granted, on a different level.

    ole joyful