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jasdip1

Pioneer Woman show

Jasdip
22 days ago
last modified: 22 days ago

Last night I was noodling around and came across the latest season of PW. I watched an episode and she was awful. She has her kids recording her show, instead of using professionals. The kids were giggling, camera was jiggling at times, and she was looking to the side and to the front. Her narrative was terrible. She's been on air for more than a decade and I used to enjoy her show. She's worth big bucks, she can do better.

I watched the very newest episode to see if maybe I was mistaken. Nope. Terrible.

Comments (94)

  • Judi
    20 days ago

    Jupidupi, this is my favorite from Mario Batali. I make it often during tomato harvest.


    Pasta with Smashed Sun Gold Tomatoes

  • Lindsey_CA
    20 days ago
    last modified: 20 days ago

    "I guess if you're training to be a media personality, that's fine, but if you want to go into any of the sciences, you won't have a clue if Renee has been your teacher." "Not that you have to keep up with Renee or Martha."

    The Pioneer Woman's full name is NOT Renee. It's Anne Marie - her "nickname" of Ree is from Marie. Marie is the name she went by when she was young, which is when people started calling her Ree.

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    I have to admit I am not a fan of Pioneer Woman. My main gripe is the way she promoted the wild horses on their Ranch. It wasn't until recently she did admit those horses belong to the BLM (a federal agency) and that the ranch receives big bucks for taking care of them. She made it seem as if the ranch was feeding them out of the goodness of their hearts when in fact not only are they paid well per horse per year they also receive tax credit and deductions for the hay they raise to feed them. This is not something a typical ranch has the opportunity to do and it rubs me the wrong way that millions think THIS is the typical life of a ranch wife. Her DIL Missy is the real rancher's wife. As far as Ree being a pioneer?....I can't think of anything nice to say so I won't.... Marilyn makes a good point about PW and not just the snakes and the possum. 'Contrived' is the word that comes to my mind to describe Ree Drummond. I do like some of her recipes and I learned lots about photoshop but any more her site leaves me cold so I don't read there anymore. Just my opinion... Lori
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    Heat, like taste, is subjective. And how much, or how little, depends on the dish it's going into. I haven't watched Pioneer Woman much lately, but back when her show first started, I watched every chance I got. I don't remember ever thinking she was adding way too much heat to anything, but that is something I would automatically adjust to my own tastes if I were following a recipe, hers or anyone else's. I've tried a couple of her recipes. Most of them are, like many of Paula Deen's, just repeats of recipes that have been around for a pretty long time. And that's fine, because they probably are new to many of the younger, newer cooks out there. One I especially like is her recipe for Brussel Sprouts. Even some of my family that would never eat them, gobble them up when I make this dish. I honestly don't remember if I got it from her website or from her TV show. I'll post it in case anyone is interested: Brussels Sprouts with Balsamic and Cranberries (Pioneer Woman) Ingredients: 3 pounds Brussels Sprouts 1/2 cup Olive Oil Salt And Pepper to taste 1 cup Balsamic Vinegar 1/2 cup Sugar 1 cup Dried Cranberries Preparation Instructions: Trim/clean Brussels sprouts, then cut them in half if desired (or you can leave them whole). Arrange on two baking sheets and toss with olive oil. Sprinkle with plenty of salt and pepper and roast at 375 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes, or until brown. Combine balsamic vinegar and sugar in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low and reduce until very thick, about 15 to 20 minutes.Drizzle the balsamic reduction over the roasted sprouts, then sprinkle on dried cranberries. Toss and serve immediately. Rusty
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  • bpath
    20 days ago

    Gee, we drive past wind farms all the time and have not seen the arms lying on the ground.

    Back to cooking shows, I watched Pioneer Woman once, and I didn’t watch again but I do make her mashed potatoes for holidayswith the cream cheese!

    Our favorite to watch, besides Jacques & Julia, is Nick Stellino. His enthusiastic storytelling-cooking is delightful! And Kevin Delton, so fun!

  • Jupidupi
    20 days ago

    Judi, that recipe looks delicious. I'm not familiar with sun gold tomatoes but next summer I'll be on the lookout for some.

  • Cindy 7
    20 days ago

    Sungold is a wonderful cherry tomato: https://territorialseed.com/products/tomato-sungold

    It is a hybrid and will not come true from saved seeds. (Ask me how I know.)

  • bpath
    20 days ago

    On Prime I’m watching an original French Chef. She is so funny! For trussing, if you can’t find a trussing needle, take a needle to your dentist, they love to drill holes in things! and, she is handling the chicken, then picks up her glasses and puts them on her face. No handwashing. And she lived to a feisty old age.

  • Adella Bedella
    19 days ago

    West Texas has a bunch of windmill farms. Some of them appear to be older and not in operation any more. I have seen business places outside of Abilene/ Sweetwater (not sure which) that have piles of arms. They don't look to be in pristine condition. Hopefully, there is a way to recycle them.

  • Judi
    19 days ago

    Jupidupi, you can use any cherry tomato, but Sun Golds really shine with their sweet, fruity flavor.

  • annie1992
    19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    Judi, are you sure that's me? I've been on Cooking for over 20 years and this is one of the few times I've been called a liar. Of course, that's why I normally avoid all forums other than Cooking and Harvest.


    As for my posts during the pandemic, I don't remember posting much. I was busy being the Township Clerk, running the family farm with my husband and caring for my elderly Mother with dementia. My comments were mostly limited to the fact that I wore a mask and had my shots, because I wanted to be very careful not to infect my Mother with anything which might sicken her. Mother passed away in December and it certainly hasn't taken very long to be reminded why I just don't post very much any more. I will certainly go back to posting only on Cooking, so as not to offend you with any of my opinions or experiences.


    As for the materials from which wind turbine arms are constructed, that's easily googled. You can find information regarding construction of wind turbines here:

    https://www.semprius.com/what-are-wind-turbine-blades-made-of/

    https://www.quora.com/Why-arent-wind-turbine-blades-made-of-aluminum

    Information includes the statement: " Are the blades of a wind turbine made of aluminum?

    Early wind turbine blades were made with aluminum. As time went on, engineers found that aluminum was too heavy and instead began using other materials like carbon fiber, glass fabric, and plastic."


    This website https://www.usgs.gov/faqs/what-materials-are-used-make-wind-turbines says turbines are predominately steel (66% to 79% of total mass), but that includes the entire structure, not just the blades. Other materials include fiberglass, resin or plastic (11-16%); iron or cast iron (5-17%); copper (1%); and aluminum (0-2%). So, wind turbines can vary from place to place, manufacturer to manufacturer. And I didn't say it didn't happen, I said I did not see that here.


    Annie

  • OllieJane
    19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    Judi, You may need to up your game in the "what you read and watch" now that more and more studies have come out. EVERYTHING I posted in the past about covid - that I read and researched from scientists in the field, immunologists, biologists and actual medical doctors - who cared for covid patients has been verified now for you to read. Actually, to most scientists, it was common sense. Stop living in your little bubble on here. There is a whole world out there that knows otherwise now.

    eta: In your defense: You were sensored from so much true information, so if you take things without questioning at all, you only believe what you see and hear. But, at some point a person's common sense has to come into play, that something was "amiss" and some of the so-called "facts" was not quite right and start to question.

    Regarding windmill turbines:

    "West Texas has a bunch of windmill farms. Some of them appear to be older and not in operation any more. I have seen business places outside of Abilene/ Sweetwater (not sure which) that have piles of arms. They don't look to be in pristine condition. Hopefully, there is a way to recycle them."

    Adella, looks like what I saw on old arms lying around and many turbines not in operation. I guess I couldn't have seen it in that location as we didn't go that way, but I assumed it wasn't the only one with piles of arms laying around.

    Around here, I haven't seen many on the ground, only a couple of arms or so, but quite of few non-operational, and I figure it's a matter of time before looking like a junkyard.

  • OllieJane
    19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    Annie, Judi was talking about me. Which is why I posted above about the pandemic.

  • Judi
    19 days ago

    Judi, are you sure that's me? I've been on Cooking for over 20 years and this is one of the few times I've been called a liar. Of course, that's why I normally avoid all forums other than Cooking and Harvest.


    Annie, I was referring to the person you quoted.

  • l pinkmountain
    19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    You know many facts can all be operating at the same time. Real life issue are multi-variable, usually not a one size fits all situation. As Annie points out, sure, some folks have great immunity, but it varies vastly over an entire population. Folks dealing with elderly parents or immune compromised family members due to cancer or organ donation etc., are much more concerned about immunity than younger, healthier folks who don't have underlying lung and other major organ system issues. If you're going to make public policy, you have to try and please the greatest number of people over time, even though there may be facts pointing to there being a group of outliers for whom the opposite is true. It's a tough balancing act. Sometimes, when I know I am an outlier, I just hold my tongue because it is unrealistic for me to expect everyone to fit my profile. Take vegetarianism, for example. Yes it's me, but I don't worry if other folks are repulsed by broccoli or eat meat for a whole variety of reasons.

    Discussing product-life design issues is a fascinating subject with no one-size-fits-all solution in that mix too, but not something we usually do on CF.

    It's totally illogical to say "nothing replaces oil in the long run" because oil is not a renewable resource. It's supply is finite, so in the long run, it will be gone. Not every last drop, but gone as far as being available in functional quantities. And the closer we get to the end, the more damage done to get the last dregs out, and the more economic impetus to find alternatives, no matter how damaging. Coal will make a big comeback, you heard it here folks! That's why conservation is such an economic no-brainer with a limited resource. No brainer meaning that's where you get your biggest bang for your buck. As to what will replace fossil fuels, well better minds than ours are pondering that, but not a discussion we usually have here either. Probably won't happen in my lifetime, but the increasing expense and in-availability of oil will become a larger and larger geopolitical issue as if it wasn't large enough already. And the increasing environmental damage to try and get more oil out, along with alternatives, no matter how damaging they also might be. Again, not something we usually discuss on CF, although we have from time to time discussed efficiency in cooking techniques and apparatus.

    However, resource economics is a field, a know entity, but one would not find such discussions that are credible with just casual googling. A lifetime of study is out there.

    You see many communities that no longer have access to coal, oil or wood for fuels on the forefront of solar, wind and biofuel technologies, by necessity. If I had a lot of land in a windy location, it would sure pay me to turn some of it into an electric energy producing resource. Particularly in areas not close to people and bird migration routes. Windmills are great for grazing land since it is multi purpose. Ranchers used wind for decades to move water out of wells to fill watering tanks. Windmills don't look any uglier to me than electric lines and power plants and huge chicken processing facilities, feedlots or blast furnaces or strip mines or car junkyards. It has always struck me as an odd complaint, as if oil rigs were less ugly? They look like power sources to me, nothing more, nothing less.

  • woodrose
    19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    I'm not fan of Pioneer Woman/Ree Drummond, but I don't hate her either. I don't care for the Pioneer Woman products sold at Walmart; most of them are too gaudy for my taste. Never made any of her recipes, so I can't give an opinion on those. Judging by how much her husband and children seem to love and respect her, she must be a nice person. I haven't watched any cooking shows for awhile, and have never watched hers. Julia Child and The Galloping Gourmet were my favorites a long time ago.

    I don't know if any of you are aware of how much damage wind turbines do to the environment. If you're a nature lover, or a bird lover, you probably won't be happy about what they do to birds.

    https://www.1energysystems.com/negative-effects-of-wind-turbines-on-the-environment/

  • Judi
    19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    "Estimates of up to a million or more birds a year are killed by turbines in the US but that is far exceeded by collisions with communications towers (6.5 million); power lines, (25 million); windows (up to 1 billion); and cats (1.3 to 4.0 billion) and those lost due to habitat loss, pollution and climate change (American Bird Conservancy, Nature).


    Even if there were twenty times more wind turbines, enough to supply the US with electricity, the number of birds killed, assuming no improvement in wind turbine design, would be about 10 million--still far less than most other causes of bird deaths."

    Source: https://www.sierraclub.org/michigan/wind-turbines-and-birds-and-bats#:~:text=Estimates%20of%20up%20to%20a,loss%2C%20pollution%20and%20climate%20change%20(

  • beesneeds
    19 days ago

    I'm not fond of her. I came across her cookbooks before I saw any of her shows. I found the cookbooks kind of boring and generic, same sort of stuff you find in a bunch of other cookbooks. I caught some of her shows later, and they were kind of boring too. I don't think I would want to watch it with kids production value.

  • Olychick
    19 days ago

    I don’t know a thing about turbines, but I can’t believe there isn’t technology that can prevent harm to birds.

  • suzyqtexas
    19 days ago

    Back on topic, I'm also from Okla and went back and visited Pawhuska 4 years ago. I found the town charming and the PW restaurant very good. Compared to Waco and the silos (I live in TX now) it was refreshing. I stayed in a newly open and remodeled bank building across the streeet from the Merchantile and it was outstanding. The history of the FBI in relation to Pawhuska is also a fascination story.

  • phoggie
    19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    I thought this was about Pioneer Woman but turned into windmills! i used to watch Ree every Saturday morning but lost interest...and as far as windmills go...there are miles of windmill graves south of Minn/St Cloud area...never to disintregate..

  • amylou321
    19 days ago

    She does not bother me but I do not adore her either. I do find extremely wealthy people who like to pretend that they live the rustic life a bit eye rolling. Like Marie Antoinette and her little folly village she had built so she could pretend to be a peasant in the safety and comfort of palace grounds. But I do not hold her good fortune against her. It has nothing to do with me.


    I do not watch Food Network very much anymore. Even Inas new shows are somewhat boring.


    As for PWs food, yes it is very unhealthy. However, its just a show. I very much doubt she was feeding her family those elaborate labor intensive meals that were full of fat and cheese to her family every single night. They want people to watch her show, so they have her cook her DELICOUS food ,not actual everyday food. No one want to see her plunk down plain baked chicken breast and canned peas on TV. A lot of her recipes are very very tasty and good for a celebration gathering or a special meal.


    I do not care for the aesthetic of her products though. I like the butterfly handles on the dutch ovens but thats it.

  • sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
    18 days ago

    Annie, the person who posted that comment is frequently loose with the truth. You should have seen her posts during the pandemic. 🙄

    That comment is so offensive and unsavory on so many levels...not Annie at all.

  • Jasdip
    Original Author
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Sleeve, I think she was just talking to Annie, not citing her. That quote is referring to another member.

  • Judi
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Annie, the person who posted that comment is frequently loose with the truth. You should have seen her posts during the pandemic. 🙄

    That comment is so offensive and unsavory on so many levels...not Annie at all.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I NEVER said it was Annie. The person I was referring to recognized herself and responded above.



    See attached screenshot.



  • OllieJane
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Watch out sleevedog, ^^^we have a stalker among us.

  • Islay Corbel
    16 days ago

    It would be lovely if people could remain repectful and behave like adults.

  • foodonastump
    16 days ago

    I haven't been able to do more than click past PW in a long time so I've not been subjected to the juvenile videography which sounds annoyingly staged. Surely if they wanted to be better, by now they would be.

    The problem as I see it, it must be incredibly hard to stay fresh. Especially if your persona is based on being youthful and fun. I liked PW well enough early on, but IMO she lost it quickly.

    A few other names come to mind in this context. These are of course just my opinions, they are admittedly opinionated and perhaps not well-informed because I don't watch any of these personalities regularly.

    RR - She managed to stay chipper and cute for a long time. But it caught up with her and sadly she's looked and sounded physically worn for a while now, no sparkle left even when she does try to fake it. I don't know how often she brings her husband on, but it's always seemed to me he'd rather be pretty much anywhere else, which drags the show down further.

    GF - Love him or hate him, the choice is yours, but he's pretty much who he's always been: "cheesy cool" and full of energy. I just wonder at what age he'll surrender his look!

    IG - Slow and steady wins the race. She is who she is, no real schtick to maintain. Solid, reliable recipes is a plus.

    MS - Does she age in reverse? Seems to me she's more fun as she gets older. And that's rare for someone who has been doing her thing as long as she has. Must be the weed.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    16 days ago
    last modified: 15 days ago

    Wow, very late to this! I didn't click on it before because I never watch that show, altho I am aware of it. I've seen her and her recipes discussed here in the past, but it's just not my cuppa tea - way too rich and unhealthy for my taste. I have the same issue with a lot of Paula Deen's & Ina Garten's recipes, tho I did used to watch Garten's show when it was new. The video cooks I like now are on YouTube - and I follow Jacques Pepin on Facebook.

    As for wind farms - I've been past the ones near Palm Springs a number of times and I think they are elegant looking and very impressive. I've also seen a huge solar array in CA too - way out away from where people live. They all really look like the future to me.

    And, FWIW, to head off confusion, it's good idea to put @ in front of the member's name you're addressing, since the sentence in question can obviously be interpreted differently, grammar-wise.

  • mxk3 z5b_MI
    15 days ago

    I've driven past wind farms and I find them quite unsettling. Those giant futuristic windmills are eerie and conjure images of a dystopian future in my mind. :o(

  • annie1992
    15 days ago

    carol, you could put @ in front of anything and I still would be confused. I don't "do" any of the social media, as I've said, they are time suckers and I have other things I prefer to do, most of which includes getting dirty and talking to cows, LOL. Plus, cell phones won't even work out here unless you can link them to someone's wifi, which works while I'm in the house but not anywhere else on the property or within 5 miles of my home.


    So some of us would still be confused with the @, and I really don't even know what it means. And yes, I'm in my 60s, so not all up to date on today's communication methods, although I may get better because we got high speed fiber optic internet just a few weeks ago, hurray!


    Annie

  • dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m
    15 days ago
    last modified: 15 days ago

    I just came back from LA, and had seen many wind turbines around. Surprised to see many turbines idling. Routine maintenance?

    A facility described by Danish energy firm Orsted as the “world’s biggest offshore wind farm” is now fully operational, generating 1.3 gigawatts, with its 165 turbines set to help power in excess of 1.4 million U.K. homes.

    But the one China is building, on land, Jiuquan Wind Power Base, also known as Gansu Wind Farm, it features 7,000 wind turbines, it is the world's biggest wind farm, with a installed capacity of 20 Gigawatts. That’s three times of all wind farms installed in the entire state of California. .

    A wind turbine typically last about 25 years, then it goes to landfill. Not a lot of turbine material can be recycled. You can Google Image “Wind turbine Graveyard” and see.

    20 GW is 20,000,000,000 watts, one watt = 3.41 BTUs of heat. So 20GW = 68,200,000,000 BTUs of global warming this wind farm can produce every hour, everyday, every year.

    Back to cooking, I only watch Jacques Pépin. I like to see good cooking, not good entertainment.

    dcarch

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    15 days ago

    Sorry I wasn't more clear - '@' with a space after it can be interchangeable with 'to', not a way to link to other social media.

    I can write a response '@ Annie' or 'to Annie' to show that my comment is to you, not about you.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    15 days ago
    last modified: 15 days ago

    Surprised to see many turbines idling. Routine maintenance?

    The turbines on each wind farm are all oriented differently so that no matter which direction the wind is blowing at least some percentage of them will be generating at their potential maximum efficiency, while others are not turning at all, and some will be moving and generating but not at maximum efficiency.

    Then there are the turbines that are not moving because they are broken, need maintenance, or there is not sufficient wind blowing.

    I do think they are an eyesore but I only have to drive by them occasionally. I don't have to live near them. The RR I work for hauls them on specially made railcars that are articulated to handle the excess length of the blades. It's pretty cool to see the trains moving down the rails loaded with turbines.

    I usually skip on by cooking shows but I've made several recipes from most of the celebrity chefs mentioned in this thread. My dad was a big Graham Kerr fan years ago.

  • CA Kate z9
    15 days ago

    Sorry, Carol, I'm with Annie. A comma(s) should suffice to address a comment to another person. I'm pretty internet savvy, but not otherwise and the @ threw me too.

  • foodonastump
    15 days ago

    "20 GW is 20,000,000,000 watts, one watt = 3.41 BTUs of heat. So 20GW = 68,200,000,000 BTUs of global warming this wind farm can produce every hour, everyday, every year."


    I LOL'd until I had a thought that you might actually be serious. 😬

  • l pinkmountain
    15 days ago
    last modified: 12 days ago

    Woodrose, one of my former colleagues from academia is an expert in bird deaths from window collisions, and also I lived near Hawk Mountain Bird Sanctuary, along one of the major bird migration routes in the US, and also a prime source for the location of wind power for the same reason. There was a lot of information on the problems with wind. However, to get some perspective, this is just one of many, many big problems for migrating birds. Habitat loss is number one. The encroaching suburbanization near Hawk Mountain was just as devastating as the wind turbines and yet we don't stop building either. Of course energy producers can try to mitigate damage to birds. Wind power has other issues for humans living nearby too. There is no one pure energy source, it's a tradeoff in every case. Fossil fuels are also destroying lots of bird habitat and pose threats to human health. That's why the smart money is on small, localized solutions tailored to local conditions, and a mix of sources. It's called the "soft path" to energy redevelopment, and has been discussed for decades in resource economics. President Obama gave some fascinating talks on taking steps today for US energy independence tomorrow. He said all cards should be on the table. I'm not in love with that idea necessarily, but realistically, that's what's going to happen, so it makes sense to figure out all the variables and try to engineer a systems that does the least damage for the most results. Standard public policy 101. Again, that's why energy conservation always tops the list as being a fantastic course of action. You often get big results with minimal impact.

    Not sure why old windmills reflect a dystopian future any more than acres of old tires and car graveyards, or any other type of junkyard, or the immense gaping holes in the earth caused by strip mining coal, or acres of stumps caused by clear cutting, some in my state never regrew the damage was so long term, etc. Ever seen acres of coal slag piled up? That land is dead for centuries. In general, some folks try to address this by incorporating disposal concerns into the engineering of products. Not often though . . . Junkyards are a valid concern, but not limited to wildmills, in fact I doubt they reach the scale of a problem as far as taking up space that cars do, or many other types of refuse we deal with from modern life.

    Having been someone who does public programming most of my life, I totally agree with FOAS's assessment of PW. I'm not really into dissing her because I totally admire someone trying to put themselves out there and turn a passion into a living. On the one hand. On the other hand, the subtleties of life often don't lend themselves to the TV medium, so there are limits to my interest in it. It is what it is. There are probably better food journalists out there, but PW is a mass appeal kind of show so it stands to reason she has her limits. And I totally get that one would not use her recipes all the time. Same with a lot of the food network hosts.

    BTW, I am loving how Lidia Bastianich and Jacques Pepin switched to simple home cooking demonstrations from their own home kitchens during the pandemic. Worth a watch, I love seeing the old masters willing to give it a go one more time for posterity. Kind of reminds me of watching "Depression Era Cooking" with 90+ year old Clara Cannucciari. Her grandson Chris was a videographer and he basically created a YouTube show that was like a visit with grandma in the kitchen, sharing recipes and stories. Loved that. I heard that there are a lot of popular YouTube channels where you just watch people cook, with no talking, just music in the background. I know Monty Don's "Gardeners World" became very popular too during the pandemic, it's a garden show where he spends a good deal of time elaborating on seasonal garden tasks and one watches him putter around his garden with his faithful dog looking on. My dog Josie would not sit calmly by watching me garden while the cameras rolled, lol!

  • l pinkmountain
    15 days ago
    last modified: 15 days ago

    As a side note on MS, I like that she has loosened up in her old age. I think a lot of criticism of her was kind of sexist. She was a powerful woman making a living emphasizing a realm usually reserved for woman. She never said one should emulate all of her tips or ideas. She wasn't cuddly, but hard to be cuddly running a multi-faceted, multi-million dollar empire . . . I dunno, again, she is what she is, and was what she was. I have some nice dishes I got at K-mart with her label on them . . . Caveat emptor on all the rest. I bought some PW placemats at Walmart that I enjoy . . .

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    14 days ago

    Point taken, Kate ☺

    I have no objection to proper grammar, just suggesting one alternative. Whatever helps clarify meaning is fine by me.

  • plllog
    14 days ago
    last modified: 14 days ago

    The @ in GW, when linked to the user's screen name in green, causes a notification to go to that person's email address, from their GW account.

  • Judi
    14 days ago

    The @ in GW, when linked to the user's screen name in green, causes a notification to go to that person's email address, from their GW account.


    That seems like a bit of overreach on Houzz's part. Who wants their email bombarded with notifications from here? Certainly not me.

  • CA Kate z9
    14 days ago

    I only get notifications when someone has responded to something I have written where I am directly mentioned. Other than that, I don't get anything else.

  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    14 days ago
    last modified: 14 days ago

    @ pillog: automatic messaging doesn't happen if you leave a space between @ and the name.

  • Olychick
    13 days ago

    I’ve never gotten any email notifications. I just get a notification here on houzzzz But it also depends on which browser I’m using whether I see ony notifications at all

  • plllog
    13 days ago
    last modified: 13 days ago

    Yes, the @ has to touch and it has to turn green linky. A list of posters should pop up and let you choose the one you want, which helps with spelling, though you may have to add or remove characters to get it to cough up the right one. I was just pointing out the functionality of the @ within this platform. Like if you want to reply to an infrequent poster, or to a thread you're not sure the person you want an answer from will see your post. I've never had scads of notifications, but then most of our group don't use the @.

    @Olychick, your settings may disallow the notification, or maybe no one's @ed you until just now.

  • Olychick
    13 days ago

    I get @ed fairly often Never get email unless someone dm’s me

  • foodonastump
    13 days ago
    last modified: 13 days ago

    Probably because that's how you set your settings. If you get any Houzz emails due to forum activity it's because that's how your account is set up. And if you do not, same thing. Easy enough to change to your liking.

    Actually I just noticed for the first time you can limit likes to five per day. Not sure if that's five total or five per comment. I do like getting the notification because it reminds me to come back to the discussion. But it can get a bit much when I say something particularly brilliant.


    Edit - well easy enough to TRY. But I get an error message when I hit "update."

  • dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m
    13 days ago

    I totally accept any Houzz software problems.

    Considering a few days ago, the entire US airlines were shutdown, not one single flight because of software issues. What about thousands of cancelations, massive luggage losses?


    dcarch

  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    13 days ago

    " That seems like a bit of overreach on Houzz's part. Who wants their email bombarded with notifications from here? Certainly not me. "

    That is pretty much SOP unless you choose to omit this function when you sign up. If you receive excessive notifications, you can go into your GW profile page and switch them off.

  • floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK
    13 days ago

    Yes, you can switch it all off. I get no communications of any kind.

  • annie1992
    12 days ago

    Thank you, Carol, for that explanation. I may never need it in the future, but at least now I know it (as long as I don't forget it, LOL, because I'm just getting older)!


    Plus I got an education on Houzz' operations that I didn't know before either, so we'll see if I can retain what I learned.


    Annie

  • Lars
    12 days ago

    annie1992, in my profile advance settings, I have only opted to be notified via email if someone mentions me, like I just mentioned you here, or if they message me.

    Instead of putting "@" in front of your name, I cut and pasted your name from your post, and this created a link to your profile. When mentioning someone this way, I believe that they will receive an email that someone has mentioned them (and that will be identified) in a post, and a link to that post will be included, but it will always be a link to the houzz.com version and never to gardenweb.com.

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