Any old family sayings?

seniorgal

My husband used to say "Never time to do it right but always time to do it over."

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bpath

My father: The first cost is the least cost.

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cooper8828

You can't unscramble eggs.

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roxsol

My dear old dad, when he made a gaffe, would just laugh and say, “Oh well, when in Rome do as the Romanians do.” He’d smile and shrug it off.

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jkayd_il5

My Mom used to say when I asked her what she was doing, "the same old six and seven". I asked her what that meant and she said I don't know. Does anyone here know?

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aok27502

"Hi mom, what are you up to?"

"Oh, just doing the pickin' up and puttin' down."

She was cleaning house.

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Uptown Gal

My Grandma used to say "I'm at sixes and sevens", jkad. It means in

a state of complete confusion. LOL

My family has lots and lots of old sayings. My Dad used to say, when

asked if we were going to do something, "God willing and the creek

don't rise". As a kid, I was bewildered...we didn't have a creek. LOL

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Bookwoman

Der Mensch tracht, und Gott lacht; Man plans, but God laughs.

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Uptown Gal

Another favorite of my Grandma..."Hard to loosen the noose, after you've tied

the knots yourself".

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samkarenorkaren

Every time someone announced they were pregnant my dad would say "in the hockey game of life one got past the goalie"

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nickel_kg

- Morgen, Morgen, nur nicht heute, sagen alle faulen Leute = Tomorrow, tomorrow, not today; that's what all the lazy people say

- God helps those who help themselves

I heard those from my mom very often growing up. She was an independent, do it yourself, no excuses sort of person. She considered herself supremely lazy, because she'd put in the required effort now rather than let a problem fester thus requiring ten times the effort later. "A stitch in time, saves nine" could have been written for her!


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skibby (zone 4 Vermont)

Hi! Any news, any rags, any bottles?

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chloebud

"Uff Dah!" from my Scandinavian mom.

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roxanna7

Skibby, that one sounds like something itinerant peddlers of old would say!

My dad: "If wishes were horses, beggars would ride", "Rise and shine" (as he would whip up the shades far too early in the mornings), and, after many a meal, "Plain fare but such as Pilgrims need" (my mother was an excellent cook tho not a fancy one).

My mother: "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again", "If you cannot say something nice, say nothing at all".

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Lars

My father used to say, "Hold her, Newt, she smells alfalfa" when he thought someone was driving too fast. I never asked him what this meant but found out later that it is an old Southern saying. I always thought he meant that someone smelled like alfalfa instead of smelled the alfalfa. Kevin later told me that our father used to call the man Newt who drove his mule pulling a wagon, and he was concerned that the wagon would fall over.

I don't remember driving past any alfalfa fields, but we might have. I don't really know what it looks like, and I don't remember smelling any.

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georgysmom2

Roxanna....I could be your mom. :-))) Those are two expressions I used with my kids growing up all the time. Did not get them from my mom. I use to hear the Brooklyn bridge one all the time. You know, If so and so jumped off the Brooklyn bridge would you do that, too.

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norar_il

From an uncle: He was supposed to be the navigator as his sister-in-law was driving through a large city.

SIL: "Which way do I go, Earl?"

Earl: "Ain't got no idie."

We use that one a lot.

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Bluebell66

Mom: “adversity builds character” and “remember the golden rule.”

Dad: “It’s good enough for who it’s for,” “You’ll never know it when you’re married.”

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dedtired

“Spanish rice”. When you were so hungry, anything at all tasted wonderful. My ex went on a hike with Boy Scouts and at the end they made Spanish rice. He remembered it as heavenly. Made it when he wasn’t hungry and it wasn’t so great.

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Ninapearl

my grandpa used to say "never squat with your spurs on".


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socks

I think what your father meant is that the mules smelled the alfalfa in the barn and wanted to rush back to the barn for the eats.

I love these old sayings. Lots of wisdom in there.

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mollycats

My grandmother would often say how much she hated a liar and a thief and out of the two a liar was the worst. You can catch a thief but, a liar will only tell you another lie. To this day I still can't tell a lie.

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hallngarden

Yes siree Bob,

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nekotish

God doesn't hit with a stick.

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aok27502

When I complained about my hair or what I was wearing, Mom would say "it'll never be noticed on a galloping cow."

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nickel_kg

Love a colorful expression, especially the old fashioned ones. "Hold your horses" was common, but I never heard the alfalfa or galloping cow sayings. I wonder what people a hundred years from now will be remembering?

My grandpa used to say "Now we're cooking with gas!", to indicate satisfaction with whatever was going on. Also "2-6-40" = speeding. And he'd say to Grandma, when she was questioning a story he'd be telling, "Vas you dere, Charley?" I looked that one up, it was popularized in a 1932 program (radio? vaudeville? early film?)

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pudgeder

"Hold her head up Judy, she smells alfalfa." That's how they said it in my family. And it meant, someone was going to fast for whatever reason, and they needed to slow it down.

The mule, Judy, when she smelled the alfalfa, would race to the barn to get to it.

Hubs grandfather would always twist sayings around. For example, instead of "If wishes were wings, frogs would fly." was "if wishes were wings, frogs would thump their butts when they jumped." LOL


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jane__ny

My mother always said, "a watched pot never boils."

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Annie Deighnaugh

My Mom used to say things like, "Great life if we don't weaken." Whenever we arrived at home after a long trip, she'd say, "We're home shouted the captain." And one that I especially disliked was how Mom woke me up in the a.m. to get ready for school: she'd come in my room snap the window shades up and say, "It's a big bright brand new beautiful day out there!" Way too much cheerfulness to wake up to!

When us kids got sassy, Dad would tell us, "Don't give me none of your rhubarb!" And whenever we had steak, Dad would say, "the closer the bone, the sweeter the meat."


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1929Spanish-GW

First nicely, then not so nicely.

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Lars

My mother always said, "a watched pot never boils."

I've watched many pots boil, and so that is rather inaccurate. I think a more correct version would be "A watched pot never boils over," but somehow the "over" got omitted and then the saying lost any real meaning.

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Zalco/bring back Sophie!

L'homme propose, Dieu dispose. Man proposes, God disposes.

Vouloir, c'est pouvoir. If you want it, then you will find a way.

Those two are common French dictums popular in my family, glaringly at odds with each other.

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Elmer J Fudd

I always liked:

Qui se ressemblent s'assemblent.

Not a literal translation but the sentiment is like Birds of a Feather Flock Together. Literally the words mean something like those who resemble one another, assemble or affiliate.

Not said in my family but repeatedly by a French - French teacher I had for several years. She never said it when it was for a good or positive connotation, always for poor behavior or low achievement. Group punishment.

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Olychick

I think "A watched pot never boils" means that if you are anxiously awaiting something, it seems to take forever. If you walk away, the pot boils much more quickly.

My mom said "If wishes were horses, beggars would ride." I've never figured out what that means, literally, but understand the intent.

Not from my family, but a friend: "In the view from the sun"....meaning that our paltry sorrows are really tiny compared to most things...if viewed from vast distance of the sun. Great reminder about perspective....like if I cannot find the color of shoes that I want or some other superficial problem.

Alfalfa smells like freshly cut grass times 100.

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seagrass_gw

I grew up hearing my paternal grandmother say "No one can take an education away from you."

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Annie Deighnaugh

Olychick, If wishes were horses...

It's an old expression. Literally it means that people with no job who beg are so poor can't afford a horse so they must walk everywhere. But if wishes came true, they'd wish for a horse and then they would be able to ride. But wishing for something doesn't make it so. So it means you can wish for whatever you want, but wishes don't come true unless you work for what you want.

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Annie Deighnaugh

Lars, a watched pot....

It's a lesson on waiting. It means that while you're standing there watching the pot waiting for it to boil, time slows to a crawl and it seems it won't ever boil. But if you turn away from the pot to do something else while you're waiting, time seems to go faster and the next thing you know, the pot is boiling.

Time drags when you're waiting for something to happen. So do something else while you're waiting and the time will go more quickly.

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Annie Deighnaugh

Mom used to say, "tough tittie but you got to chew it," meaning, life is hard so deal with it. She also said, "You made your bed, now lay in it," meaning you got what you asked for...if you're unhappy about it, you have only yourself to blame.

My grandparents used the expression, "Going a mile a minute" which meant really fast..which in their day, it was. Now going 60mph on the highway means you'll hold up traffic!

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Rudebekia

Der Apfel fallt nicht weit von der Baum--the apple doesn't fall far from the tree, or "like father, like son."

Hunger ist der beste Koch--Hunger is the best cook.

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Raye Smith

In the south there are hundreds of sayings. One of my favorites is "cat fur for kitten britches" if you southern you know what it means.

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tvq1

Two favorites from my Mom: "Two wrongs don't make a right", and "if it's worth doing, it's worth doing right".

I have since changed the second saying to my own motto: "If it's worth doing, it's worth overdoing!".

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jim_1 (Zone 9A)

"Shut up and eat!"

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nickel_kg

Jim's reminds me of two sayings from one of my last jobs: "Shut up and color", and "[organization name] --the "F" is for "Fun" " <-- and there was no letter "F" in the organization's name.

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Lars

I guess pots used to take a lot longer to boil in the past than they do now! Thanks for explaining that, Oly and Annie. It really never made sense to me before, but then a lot of old sayings never did make sense to me, and so I ignored them.

I used to watch pots to make sure that they didn't boil over, and so that's what made sense to me. I think I have misinterpreted a lot of old sayings.

My father used endless clichés and they bothered me immensely. My mother did not use them.

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Indigo Rose

Nickel - my day used to say "hold your horses" and "now we're cooking with gas," and I'd forgotten the latter. Annie, I've never heard "don't give me none of your rhubarb'" but I wish I had said that to my kids when they were sassy.! Every night dad would say "good night, don't let the bedbugs bite", and in the morning we'd hear him call "rise and shine" - maybe from his time in the Marines?

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tvq1

Indigo Rose: I love the bedbug saying! In our family we had a beloved aunt with developmental delays, and she used to say "Don't let the bed bugs chew you to bits", so now that's what we say! Sweet memories of staying with my grandparents and hearing her say that every night.

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Elizabeth

In the 1960's cocktail parties were all the rage, especially with an aunt and uncle of mine. During the evening, my aunt would use the phrase, " I may as well be drunk as the way I am". That's when we knew it was time to cut her off. 😉

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chisue

Passed down from my maternal grandfather, "Measure twice. Cut once."

Grandmother: "Each to her own tastes, said the lady as she kissed the cow." Also, "Wishing won't make it so."

My MIL's mother: "Nothing good ever happens after 1 a.m."

Neighbor: "Wherever in life you find yourself, that's where you are."

I remember a lot of sayings about attire. "Loving hands at home," was a nasty putdown. My DM, commenting on a man's loud sports jacket: "Somewhere, a horse is cold." This is similar to MIL's judgement of a homely blouse or dress: "Some table is bare today." I'm guessing these go along with Raye Smith's 'cat fur on a kitten'. Is that a girl too young for her clothing or actions? And *that* reminds me of the braggart who is, "All hat and no cattle."


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sheilajoyce_gw

My Dad -- He's a self made man who loves his maker. Nicely, quietly, and politely. (We 4 kids were a noisy bunch.) My grandmother -- Pretty is as Pretty does.

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nycefarm

Mama always said Pretty is as pretty does.

Daddy always said Don't let the bastards get you down (but in Latin).


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bpath

So funny, I just heard a talking head say “all hat and no cow” on Stephanopolous‘s show! Right after the Chicagoan joked tongue-in-cheek about their traditional saying. “That dog don’t hunt.” (No politics intended here, just the phraseology coincidence.)

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olychick

Along the lines of Jim's: "Stop crying or I'll give you something to cry about." :(

Thanks for that explanation about beggars and horses, Annie. I knew the gist of it, but never could figure out why beggars were singled out. Now I see.

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Zalco/bring back Sophie!

An English friend taught me their version of, All hat and no cattle, which I like a lot.

Empty pots make the most noise.

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stacey_mb

My mother would express indignation about something she found disagreeable by using a Ukrainian phrase that translated means "What else would there be!" Although I don't speak the language, I use those words now in affectionate memory.

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bpath

Stacy, my father had a Ukrainian employee who’d say “what you can do?” for “what can ya do?“ We all adopted it.

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murraysmom Zone 6a OH

Whenever my mom opened the back door to let the dog out, my dad would say "hurry up, you're heating up all of Mt. Airy" which is where we lived.

Most of the saying above were ones I grew up with. It was my parents and friends' parents saying those things though. My grandparents had all passed by the time I was born.

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Jeb zone5

One more! My Great Grandmother used to say "Apple cider apple cider, makes your smile grow wide and your belly grow wider!"

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

Fun topic!

I see many aphorisms that our family used too, and a number that are new to me as well 🙂

My dad was the one who had a lot of favorites. These are a few I recall that I haven't seen above:

'Your father wasn't a glazier (glassmaker)' - said when someone was blocking his view of the TV.

'Give 'em enough rope and they'll hang themselves' - meaning let people fail.

'When you hit the white stuff, it's the brains' - when someone was picking their nose.

'Hoist with their own petard' - when someone's plan backfired.

'I'm at the end of my rope!' - mostly to us kids when we were driving him crazy.

'I'm so tired I can't see straight' - he said this a lot!

And my mom likes to repeat these sayings from my dad's mom, her MIL:

'Eat what you can and what you can't we'll can' - said at a big meal.

'There's no accounting for taste, said the man as he kissed the cow'

And my interpretation of the ' if wishes were horses' saying is that there are so many wishes in the world, that if they were all horses, there would be plenty of horses for everybody, even beggars.

And yes, 'a watched pot never boils' equals 'stop hovering' 😉

I enjoy using old & new aphorisms, and do so as often as possible. I even have a Dictionary of Phrase & Fable that was my father's.


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bpath

Carol, our dad said “you make a better door than a window”, kind of like “not a glazier”.

I love all the memories this is conjuring up.

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marilyn_c

My mother, born in 1904, had a lot of funny sayings.

Not from my mother, but in response to Lars, Hold her Newt...

I always heard "Hold her Newt, she's gonna buck!"

If you asked my mother if she was ready, she would say, "I'm Reddy's calf."

If you said, "What for?". She would say, "What fur? Cat fur to make kitten britches."

If she wanted you to move over, she would say, "you would make a better door than a window" only she pronounced it win-der.

If she didn't know someone you were talking about...she would say, "I wouldn't know him from Adam's off ox.". (I think that meant the ox on the right side of a team....called the off side. The one on the left is the near side.)

If she heard me whistling, she would say

"Whistling girls and crowing hens, always come to some bad end.". Meaning it wasn't ladylike. Also when a hen gets old and stops laying eggs, their hormones change and they will start to crow...altho not exactly like a rooster. That means they are destined for the stew pot.

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yeonassky

I made up some of my own because the Danish ones never really translated very well. There was one about a cow and somehow I got that mixed up in my mind with the stitch one so I'd say my made up one and still do. Maybe because it's more concrete in my mind?

A stitch now saves the cow.

My interpretation of a watched pot never boils was always that the pot doesn't need you to help it to boil so go do something else and come back and check on it. Now I use a timer because my induction stove is so quick. I barely turn around to get something out of the fridge and it is time to put the pasta or whatever in the boiling water.

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hallngarden

Can’t turn a sow’s ear into silk, engaged in hopeless task.

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Bookwoman

I know that one as "You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear."

ETA, I just thought of one that was a favorite of my mother's: Il faut souffrir pour être belle, i.e. One must suffer in order to be beautiful. Very lousy advice, if you ask me!

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roxanna7

carolb -- may I congratulate you on having Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable? Many years ago, I bought one at a library book sale and it has been a delight. I once vowed to read the entire book, but haven't yet -- now that the library is closed, I shall endeavor to amuse and educate myself once again. Thank you for the reminder!!

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artemis_ma

As they occur to me, I'll post:

Mom: "You have to eat a pound of dirt before you die". She meant if you have grit in your food it's not all that bad, you can eat some of it. I took it to mean fine to eat, but please don't let me get near a pound of it, because I don't want to die!

Mom: "Think of all the starving children in India". Said when I didn't want to clean my plate. At a very young age, I turned to her in all true seriousness - I really meant it - and said something to the effect of: "Can we mail this to them, please?" That statement of hers for some reason disappeared after that.

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jrb451

Heard in a courtroom during cross examination: “So, you didn’t see him chew it, you just saw him spit it out.” “Are you going to fish or cut bait?”

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artemis_ma

Either parent, upon getting their first car with Air Conditioning: "Roll up your window, we're not air conditioning Pennsylvania (or whatever state it was)." Unfortunately both my parents smoked heavily, and i was trying to ... breathe.

Hold your horses. I did get this one... Just calm down.

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artemis_ma

I am not certain which parent said it (maybe both?) but A watched pot never boils. I probably had that budding scientist in me at that time, so I took it upon myself one evening (when I wasn't particularly hungry, just in case) to watch a pot heat up and all. It boiled, and I was watching it. Hypothesis disproven!

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

@ bpath, I have read quite a bit of it, and what's funny about that dictionary is that a lot of the more common phrases we use often (and many shared here) are not in there, while many I find uncommon are. I think it's because they are derived from classical literature & academia and also England & Europe.

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aok27502

The clean plate example made me remember another one. If I didn't like something on the plate, Dad would say "eat it, it'll make your hair curly." I already had kinky curly hair, so that was no motivation.

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Honu3421

I’m Enjoying this thread and just wrote a long post that disappeared. So I will just list my sayings.

Dad: you’re holding up the vinegar works.

they treat me like a mushroom.

Finish your dinner. Children in China are starving.

Mom: a blind man on a galloping horse wouldn’t notice.

He can go pound sand in his ear.

He doesn’t have a dog in this race.

Sheep in lamb‘s clothing.

From work:

Never met a conflict of interest I didn’t like.

is this the hill we want to die on?

Keep your eye on the prize.

He needs a come to Jesus meeting.

DH: He’s not the sharpest tool in the shed. Or, half a bubble off.

ETA. You’re preaching to the choir

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nekotish

A few from my paternal grandmother have just come to mind:

Don't meet trouble halfway (don't worry about things that haven't happened)

Chin up and soldier on.

In for a penny, in for a pound

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Lars

Here's one I heard in San Francisco: "It's not pretty being easy."

A friend who was giving a Thanksgiving dinner party in Los Angeles found a half-drunk bottle of beer and said, "Who left this beer? Don't you know there are sober children in India?"

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patriciae_gw

My mother was full of sayings. The one I found most funny was "tight as Dick's hatband" apparently Dick had a swelled head.

For those who dont know Rhubarb was a medicine made from Rhubarb root and I gather it tasted terrible. How it came to mean sass is I suppose one of those mysteries.

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Honu3421

Here’s one of my favs. “Looks might get you in the door but they won’t keep you in the room.”

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functionthenlook

People in hell want ice water too.


Take all you want, but eat what you take.


Your face will freeze that way.





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bpath

Function, our father said that ”take all you want, but eat all you take” was on a sign of the enlisted men’s mess on his transport ship to the Philippines in 1945. At our table, it was usually accompanied by “your eyes were bigger than your stomach”, followed Mom’s “Don‘t you know there are children starving in China/Africa/India?”

DH, on the other hand, was #6 of 7, but mostly boys. I think he heard instead, “save some for your sisters” lol.

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functionthenlook

Bpath, it very well could of come from a troop ship. My father was on a troop ship during WWII heading to the Philippines. I just assumed it was from the depression so you didn't waste food.

The nuns at school use to say the children in china. So when the nuns weren't looking we use to put the food we didn't like in our empty milk cartons.

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HU-629454853

When we were playing dominoes and someone asked the score Daddy would name the losing one and say that he/she were "sucking the hind tit." I think that was because the rear teats in animals have the less milk. I was young and that embarrassed me.


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jemdandy

A nonsensical saying my mother knew: "Peaches, peaches. Someone's coming with a hole in his britches." This phrase was spoken with a sing-song cadence. This may have come from her time as a young child (ca 1910), or her mother's (ca 1870). Back then a ripped seam in the seat of your pants was a common failure in boy's wear, especially if the seam was hand sewn or made with non-locking stitches. It was a point of wear for a horseman riding many miles in the saddle. Sometimes the wearer was not aware of the gap and it was an item of ridicule. Also, it could have referred to a worn garment having holes at the knees, usually from children spending time on their knees while playing. The actual source of this saying has been lost to antiquity and was used by children who liked its cadence. (Growing up 100 years ago, children used a variety of devices to amuse themselves and annoy the adults.)

"He deals from the bottom of the deck" meaning he is a onerous person or one who cheats and lies.

"Red sky in the morning, sailor's warning; Red sky at night, sailor's delight." Refers to weather conditions; An old forecasting adage.

"There's light at the end of the tunnel.": Things appear bleak at the moment, but if we keep plugging along, the situation will improve.

"A green cloud spells trouble." During summer, a farmer looking at an approaching rain cloud, if he saw a greenish coloration near the bottom of the cloud, he'd see that as a sign of of possible hail in the cloud.

"All that glitters is not gold." This comes from confusing pyrite (Iron sulfide) as gold. Pyrite is a common mineral with a brassy color. A neophyte panning for gold and spying pyrite flakes could mistake it for gold and become very excited. A miner with larcenous intentions and having a non-productive mine might 'salt' his claim with pyrite in an attempt to sell a worthless property to the uninitiated. This phrase was often told by parents to their children that the wealth they see in someone else may be faked, or that a supposed possession would be the best thing to have when it would not. Be satisfied with the good things that you have.

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Annie Deighnaugh

Expressions at work:

Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater....meaning don't destroy the whole process, but keep what's good.

We were in corporate so people who went to the businesses where actual work got done and bought what the business managers told them that disagreed with corporate's directives were said to have "gone native."

"Don't let it fester." In other words, don't try to deal with a problem or cover it up but bring it out into the open so we can throw adequate resources at it to fix it. And every time someone said that phrase, I would picture Uncle Fester.

And another favorite expression because it works so well is, "Got it." Used when people won't shut up about something and keep repeating themselves....it's really helpful to get them to stop.



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chisue

MIL's parents came to Minnesota from Denmark. This was said in resignation: "Bread and beer, bread and beer. If I'd not married, I wouldn't be here."

Not a saying, but another amusing quote from MIL, regarding a sister-in-law: "She was a lot more fun before she got religion."

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marilyn_c

Instead of the starving children saying, my mother would say, when I didn't want to eat something, "A little bird would like to have that."

I remember when I bought my first Quarter Horse, for $1200, which was a lot more money in 1967....my dad said "when two fools met"...meaning the fool who asked that amount and the fool (me) who paid it.

He also said "a fool and their money, soon parted". Didn't hurt my feelings. I loved that horse. One of the best horses I've ever owned.

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ILoveRed

“Mom used to say, "tough tittie but you got to chew it," meaning, life is hard so deal with it.”


lol, my mom said...tough tittie but the milks still good....meaning the same as Annie’s


my favorite all time expression and I say it now (from my mother-in-law).... “Many hands make light work“.

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Yayagal

My Scottish dad used to say "If I don't see you through the week, I'll see you through the window." He also had us all hold up our glasses at every meal and say "Cheers". Now my great grandson and I are carrying on the tradition. He's four. He even has the kids at preschool doing it.

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sjerin

Yaya, my dh used to do that with our kids when they were younger, and as they aged to middle school we would give them a sip of wine so they wouldn't be as excited to drink it in high school and beyond. It worked.

My parents were older so they said a lot of old-fashioned things, but I can't remember any right now! I do miss hearing my mom talk.

A person on this site I corresponded with for awhile, (she left,) used to end out chats by telling me it was time to kill some rats. She said her mother used this saying.

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jane__ny

"One Hand Washes the Other." "A fool and his money are soon parted." "Beggars can't be choosy." "If it isn't broke, don't fix it." "Don't rub salt into the wound."

My Irish mother had so many sayings, I can't remember them all. When someone above writes one, I remember her saying it. I think she said them all!

Jane

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stacey_mb

A favorite uncle often said, "see you 'round if I don't see you square" and "see you in the funny papers."

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bragu_DSM 5

our family is a bunch of hard workers, not philosophers ....



so I got a philosophy degree ...

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Honu3421

This: Cooler heads prevail

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jemdandy

Pity the poor snake who does not have a pit to hiss in.

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nickel_kg

jemdandy, that's not quite the way I heard it, lol. Another one my mom would occasionally use: Get off your high horse. Also, Don't cut off your nose to spite your face.

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Lars

Here's another my father would say (I think), "I wouldn't wear that to a dog fight." Of course we would reply, "Good; we're not going to a dog fight."
At lot of things he said really did not make sense to me.

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Honu3421

A few more:

“No good deed goes unpunished.” “Pigs get fed, hogs get slaughtered.” We said this generally during negotiations. “Careful what you wish for.” Make sure you understand the possible ramifications of your ask.

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smiling

my grandparents phrase describing poverty: "They don't have two nickels to rub together."

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Annie Deighnaugh

I'll throw in some regulars from Judge Judy:

If you tell the truth, you don't need a good memory.

If it doesn't make sense, it's not true.

You know how you can tell when a teenager is lying? Their lips are moving.

They don't keep me here 'cause I'm gorgeous, they keep me here 'cause I'm smart.

God gave you two ears and one mouth for a reason.

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norar_il

Every morning when my father left for work he said "I'm off -- like a herd of turtles".

I love the "Hold her, Newt . . . "

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Cherryfizz

These are fun to read. There are lots of sayings in my family but I can't recall them right now except for my Mom always saying whenever anyone called a ship a boat haha and now I say it too, "You can put a boat on a ship but you can't put a ship on a boat" We live near the river so we always heard that. My Great Grandma had some good sayings. When my brain starts working sometime today, maybe after coffee I will post some more.


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Honu3421

Norar - my father always said “we’re off like a herd of turtles.” No matter how many times I heard it it always made me laugh. Thanks for reminding me of that one.

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Lars

Those Judge Judy quotes are some of the worst - I disagree with all of them. No wonder I can't stand her. A friend of mine was asked to be on her show because he was suing his contractor, and he refused, even though it would have meant more money for him.

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