still think sending kids back to school is safe?

rob333 (zone 7a)

Look at the picture in the article. Nose to nose, maskless and masked. A student took and posted this picture. They suspended her for telling, but they have since reversed it. If this doesn't look like COVID spreading right before your eyes, they can't be opened.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2020/08/06/georgia-teens-shared-photos-maskless-students-crowded-hallways-now-theyre-suspended/

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ritamay91710

Nope, I sure don't think it's safe.

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morz8

Then there was this this morning....Georgia, Barrow County schools move to remote learning after 90 staff exposed.......

I don't think any local schools here are planning in person classes to begin the year. Our niece was to begin pre-school (private, catholic) and her Mom learned since over 2 (but not yet three), she would be required to wear a mask all hours at school. This little 'terror' was really unlikely to keep one in place without constant attention which would be a school experience distraction, so good thing its OK at her age she won't be going next month. I think she'll be fine without formal instruction at 2, she has other opportunities for learning and social interactions....


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Elmer J Fudd

rob, that school clearly needs a new principal and the district a new superintendent to have such an out of control situation take place. Morons like that can't lead schools or manage the institutions with dedicated souls (the teachers) who want to have safe conditions to teach children.

Sadly, this scene will be repeated in thousands of schools until the hoards of idiots who deny facts realize they've got it very wrong.


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rob333 (zone 7a)

Can't we just postpone until January? PLEASE?!

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daisychain01

I read in the article that the administrators blamed it on necessary class changes and that they couldn’t avoid having all the kids in the hall at the same time. our school admin team has spent the summer rejigging all class times and room placements so that this doesn’t happen. Saying that is was unavoidable just means they are either lazy or don’t care about Medical experts advice to physical distance.

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Annegriet

Definitely NOT.

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maifleur03

Children like many elderly are now throwaways. It does not matter if they become ill or even die to many. The worst I have seen was a grandmother who wanted her grandchild to go to school. If he died he would get to see Jesus. She was followed by others of the same thought although most seemed to think no child would die.

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Mrs Pete

Look at the picture in the article. Nose to nose, maskless and masked.

Not to be difficult, but I don't see a single mask in that picture -- not one. Are we supposed to believe that not one single student was concerned enough to wear a mask? Do we know this picture wasn't pre-Corona?

I don't think any local schools here are planning in person classes to begin the year.

We're 100% remote here, and the school board says they'll meet every two weeks to reevaluate. I think that's a wise choice.

Our niece was to begin pre-school (private, catholic)

Preschool is optional. I totally accept that it's a good thing, especially for a "little terror", but -- with today's health concerns -- why risk it?

I think she'll be fine without formal instruction at 2, she has other opportunities for learning and social interactions....

Ah, I see you're with me. Incidentally, neither of my children went to preschool. Both graduated from college with the words Magna Cum Laude after their names. But what do I know? I didn't even go to kindergarten.

Can't we just postpone until January? PLEASE?!

I don't expect things to be better in January. I don't think we're going to be rid of this until we have a vaccine.

I read in the article that the administrators blamed it on necessary class changes and that they couldn’t avoid having all the kids in the hall at the same time. our school admin team has spent the summer rejigging all class times and room placements so that this doesn’t happen.

Yeah, when we thought we were going back with a hybrid schedule, our admin was working on one-way hallways and staggered class dismissals.

With that in mind, I do note that all these students are walking the same direction -- but that could mean it's the beginning (or end) of the day, and everyone's entering (or leaving) the classroom halls.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

The news on many fronts isn't good, yet most authorities here are moving ahead. It's appalling to me. Our 'leaders ' are so intent on preserving the economy, but their recklessness and disregard for public health seems bound to make things much, much worse.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

I'm not going to quibble. But one thing, look at their ears

They have earloops. Yes, some have masks on!!!


But like I said, your eyes can't be opened

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Lucille

I don't think we're going to be rid of this until we have a vaccine.

Then schools with physical classrooms shouldn't open until then. Kids can do distance learning and be ALIVE when the vaccine is offered.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

I couldn't agree more Lucille. Why are there those who date to sacrifice the MOST precious? I don't get it

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georgysmom2

Elmer beat me to it. If the schools can say you have to wear a uniform or you cannot wear skirts shorter than so many inches or you can't wear shirts with the American flag on it because it offends some people, it seems to me they can say you cannot enter without a mask and if you are caught not wearing your mask You go back to home on-line schooling for a minimum of three months.....you are OUT of here!!! The leadership has to come from the Superintendent, the Principal, the Vice Principal and the teachers.

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Kathsgrdn

To quote our brilliant Commander-in-chief, "it is what it is". Maybe they can take a school trip to Thighland or Yo Semite?


~Kath, who's loving living in a 3rd World Country.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

Read this today - it's very, very disturbing to me:

https://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/20200807/health-directors-told-to-keep-quiet-as-fla-leaders-pressed-to-reopen-classrooms

"...As Gov. Ron DeSantis pushed this summer for schools to reopen, state leaders told school boards they would need Health Department approval if they wanted to keep classrooms closed.

Then they instructed health directors not to give it.

Following a directive from DeSantis’ administration, county health directors across Florida refused to give school boards advice about one of the most wrenching public health decisions in modern history: whether to reopen schools in a worsening pandemic, a Gannett USA TODAY NETWORK review found.

In county after county the health directors’ refrain to school leaders was the same: Their role was to provide information, not recommendations....

...Lacking clear guidance from their local health directors, school board members in many counties said they felt compelled to reopen classrooms despite serious misgivings about exposing teachers and students to COVID-19.

Keeping campuses closed, they said, risked violating an edict last month from state Education Commission Richard Corcoran, which decreed public schools “must open brick and mortar schools at least five days per week.”

“When we voted to reopen schools, I’ll be honest and tell you I did it because we are under an executive order to do so,” Marc Dodd, a school board member in Lake County, said last week. “Do I think they’re safe? Absolutely not.”..."


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carabubble

Besides the photo, the student, Hannah, also posted a video. In the video you can see that some students are wearing face masks.

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arcy_gw

It will certainly be an uphill battle getting students to wear masks whose parents have been crabby about them! We will open for all students as usual Aug 31st. There is no one fits all answer and schools are doing the best they can to fulfill their mission. Surveys were sent out. Not 10% of opted to not return to in school class. The community is behind the decision it appears. 50% opted out of busing. It seems parents are more concerned about transportation than classes. The plan our District has would never allow the number of students in a hall that the picture shows.

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Michele

There is no way the schools will be able to be safe. You’d have to trust that every family is following safety recommendations. You’d have to trust that all the buses and trains and cars are all kept sanitized. You’d have to believe the schools have the resources and people power to continually sanitize adequately.

I surely am not that trusting. I’m afraid it will be a disaster. I believe however, that if we stick to distance learning for the time being, these kids will be able to live to tell their grandchildren about living through the 2020 pandemic.

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arcy_gw

Chill Elmer parents aren't making public health decisions!! They are making decisions for the good of their own children--and like it or not that is THEIR JOB. NOT the governments, NOT the school board, PARENTS'!! The school gave them all the options. Remember schools are funded through public monies and are MANDATED to educate all children birth to 21!! Schools don't have the luxury to say 'ya no we will sit this year out' they HAVE TO offer what they feel they can. Thus far OUR numbers do not warrant a shut out. Saying that I logged on to say: Anyone else find it IRONIC our school board--10 or so adults met via zoom to decide to put 1000 students in one building!! THEY don't feel safe meeting --physically distanced 6ft apart with masks on but they feel it is AOK for children to!!! I find that HILARIOUS!!

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nickel_kg

It's really a matter of responsibilities, isn't it. I agree with arcy that parental responsibility is primary above all others. If I had a school age kid, no way would I let a school administrator over-ride my personal evaluation of any situation's safety. Most parents feel that way, but not every parent is able to come up with a good alternative -- especially for kids too young or immature to stay home by themselves. It's hard.

It is a mess. Messes generally don't straighten themselves out. They require imagination to see new ways of doing things, and leadership to rally, guide, and connect the troops to those new ways. So now I'm agreeing with Elmer about the importance of leadership. Individual school principals especially are going to need to be strong leaders with regard to Covid health practices, Or else the virus wins.

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Elizabeth

If I had a school age child I would not send them into a classroom. Certainly there will be a spread of the disease. Children, being children, are impulsive and will talk and play in close proximity and often be mask-less. They will bring Covid-19 home to many households not to mention the exposure that teachers and their families will have. My child would be home schooled and I would look for small local pods to share the teaching with frequent testing.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

I'd like to point out that teachers and staff have families, many have young kids of their own and many school employees are in the high risk category.

It's not just students' safety at risk here.

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adellabedella_usa

I don't have a subscription. I can only see the picture. The only ear loops I saw looked like glasses to me so it looks like an old picture. I have seen some really weird explanations on masks from folks who absolutely don't want to wear them. If this picture is current, schools like this will be the test cases that provide support for schools to make a decision.


Whether to attend school in person or online is not an easy of a decision as you would think. These kids need socialization, skills, and hope. Outside extracurricular activities have started at our school in the last couple of weeks. I went and observed. One group was stationed 15 feet away from each other and did a great job social distancing. Another group did great on the field and not so great walking back inside the school. My dd's group is not allowed inside the school except for a handful of people who have to go in and get stored equipment. Actual physical school has been pushed back several weeks. I see it keep getting pushed back. We could do strictly online school, but, I want my child to think there is a chance of some normalcy coming up. We realize her chances of getting out of the field in her activity are probably quite slim. Just seeing old friends... even at a distance has made her happy.

My middle kid will be at home and getting online certifications. My other child going to college could sit out this year, but he has an online job all summer and has been accepted into a program where he is doing some things and gaining experience that some of his college mates lost the opportunity to do. He has two in person classes and they are smaller groups. If he withdrew, he'd have nothing to do and then he would end up getting a job with more physical contact.


As a mom, I want my kids to stay little and be safe with me. I can't do that. My kids don't have years to stay home and hide. We're making the best decisions that we can, while trying to stay safe and taking care of the necessities. We're also taking calculated risks, but not going willy nilly with it.

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sjerin

Will we hear about the spread coming from the schools? I doubt it, because it's not good p.r.

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Annegriet

School might not be such a big problem if the entire nation had worked to together to stop the spread.

About 10% of our nation has been and will continue to not wear masks, throw parties, ignore social distancing and mock science.

This is a long term problem.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

Even if they are or aren't wearing masks, that is certainly not social distancing. That alone, would tell a rational person the schools aren't going to get it right. However, her video is available if you bothered to look for it. But like I said, your eyes won't be opened. Until it's too late


Yes, there is one easy answer for this, postpone until there's a vaccine. They said 12-18 months, and it be 12 months in January. There are late stage clinical trials going on, with vaccines that look promising.


Risking my son's life, my life, my mother's life... because there are parents and students so antsy and can't stand being at home, isn't a good enough reason. Lives are at stake, so who gives a flying flip if there's any inconveniences? It's not up to you who is put at risk, nor should it be.

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chisue

School is another place where COVID has been like the receding tide. It reveals underlying problems in society.

What IS 'school'? For many, the opportunity for a formal education is only tangential. It's free babysitting. It's socialization. It's two or three meals a day. It's a safe place in a rough neighborhood and away from abusers at home. It may offer some health care. There might be a social worker.

When parents elect to send their children to school during this pandemic, some are reflecting on the above. Some also have little or no access to remote learning tools. In some homes (rich and poor) there is no capable adult willing or able to stay home and supervise.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

Our school system overcame the food portion. Buses are used to deliver food. To the bus stops. Not to the school, and you come get it.


We all need socialization. We're all desperate for it.


As for babysitting, many parents are working from home who didn't before. That's some of them. Some, if responsible, can stay home alone. It doesn't solve the littlest, but it's not all of them.


Postponing one semester isn't that big of a deal on the scheme of things.


Not to disagree, but suggestions for the greater good.

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socks

How can it be safe for our precious children? What's changed since March? It's worse, that's what. It's not just seniors who have health issues; many parents do as well. Even teachers do. Maybe older students with masks and strict enforced distancing (not like the video) could work.

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Elizabeth

Arcy, I agree with you. Your views do matter at home or in public and public health officials need to respect that. You pointed out, quite aptly, that they only meet by Zoom meeting because of the health hazard...but it is OK for kids and their families, right? There is no "moving on" until there is a vaccine or effective treatment.

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Elizabeth

Yes, isolating ourselves from crowded, congested environments with little or no sanitation, masks or distancing is just pain selfish. I see that. /S


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Elizabeth

I replied without name calling and expressed my opinion. I wonder what causes a seemingly intelligent person to respond to an opposing opinion with such venom? The psychopathy of that is so interesting.

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maifleur03

I hope that people who are sending their children have plans for when the children become sick and die beyond a go fund me page. With the lack of thinking beyond "I want" there will be many small coffins filled in the next few months with the family wailing "but we did not know" while thinking it would be another families child. The lack of desire to have a healthy child has always seemed to be more of a Munchausen problem that something to be looked forward to by supposedly loving adults.

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desertsteph

the uneducated and untrained morons with personal agendas we have in political offices who've been proven wrong over and over.

we have lots of those in CA, WA, OR, NY, IL, MN and other dem led states, plus the dem mayors of many cities.

if I still had school age kids they wouldn't be going back into a school building for classes. They'll survive.


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joyfulguy

Could we call school board members who say it's O.K. to send kids into the usual non-distanced classrooms (with slightly lower populations due to some parents withholding their offspring) but who hold their own meetings via Zoom ....

... "ZOOMERS"?

(Some of them quite possibly "Boomers" already).

o j (sorta thankful offspring crowding 60 and no grandkids ... to be burdened with paying off the covid19-related additions to regular gov't debts)

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sjerin

They'll survive.

But Steph, will their teachers and their grandparents? This is an extremely virulent virus and has been proven to be deadly over and over.

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maifleur03

I saw where several people both students and three teachers have now tested positive to the virus. Since health conditions are covered under HIPPA I doubt unless the families release the information the condition of the infected people will be known to the public.

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Lucille

"if I still had school age kids they wouldn't be going back into a school building for classes. They'll survive."

I agree, kids should not be going back into physical school buildings.

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Annegriet

Teachers should not be going back either.

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maifleur03

Make that 9 people that are infected. According to several news sources, pick the one you want to look at, the school is planning on deep cleaning and will be doing virtual instruction. No mention of how long the virtual instruction will last but my best guess is the rest of the year.

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Winter

In part...from an article on the front page of the Wall Street Journal today:

"Children might be more vulnerable to Covid-19 than once believed, with
new research suggesting that they are able to contract and spread the
virus, especially if they don’t take precautions such as wearing a mask."

My subscription to the WSJ needs renewing so I didn't get to read the entire article this morning but it's not the first such article that I've read. I've been awed to learn that the world of medical science now believes that children are very active carriers of the virus and are more often than not...asymptomatic.

All this documented knowledge and some areas are still pushing to open their schools this Fall? Something is certainly amiss in their brain departments. 🙄

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sjerin

It defies logic up, down and all around. They might as well be telling us the earth is flat, 'cause it's the same thing.

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Annette Holbrook(z7a)

The school in the pic is near me. I drive past it multiple times per week. There are no masks from what I can tell. I was nearby on Friday during carpool time and didn’t see any evidence of precautions. Not surprising at all. This is deep red country. Also lots of trucks with confederate flags mounted on the back so...

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

FWIW, a friend just shared this on FB - from the Daily Mail, but it's about the USA.:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8609847/Nearly-100-000-children-test-positive-coronavirus-past-two-weeks.html

"...97,000 children tested positive for COVID-19 from July 16 to July 30, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics


Of the over five million coronavirus cases in the US, 338,000 were children..."


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maifleur03

If children are similar to adults who show now symptoms they too will have long term health defects. https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/scientists-see-lung-damage-in-asymptomatic-covid-19-patients/ar-BB16aukf

I am aware that nothing anyone can post will convince the naysayers until several of the people they love develop it. They must see it is not something that only a few have long term health problems if their loved one does not die.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

Not sure if even that would convince some folks, maifleur...

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maifleur03

I know that some will not be convinced even on their own death bed. However it is better that it is their death bed than a child's.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

But wait, there's more...

https://www.thedailybeast.com/5-year-olds-covid-saga-has-florida-mom-saying-hell-no-to-in-person-school


"...For months, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has waged a public relations campaign to convince parents that it is safe for their children to return to campus. He has consistently argued that a majority of children are unlikely to get very sick and unlikely to become super-spreaders of coronavirus—statements supported, at least to a degree, by studies and health experts. “Children of all ages are susceptible to COVID-19, though thankfully, few develop severe disease requiring hospitalizations and a large percentage are symptom-free,” said Dr. Aileen Marty, an infectious-disease professor at Florida International University in Miami.

But those children who end up in the hospital can develop serious, even deadly, secondary complications from the disease, including heart failure, blood clots and acute kidney injury, Marty cautioned. She also noted parents whose children catch the virus also have to watch for signs that could lead to multi-symptom inflammatory syndrome, or MIS-C, the disturbing illness associated with coronavirus that appears to only affect children. “It’s a small percent, thank goodness,” Marty said. “But even one child with this is tragic.”...

...Marcellus went home after seven days of isolation in Palm West’s intensive care unit, his mom said. He may still need surgery to remove his appendix. Policik said she and her husband have, like so many others parents, had long, difficult conversations about what to do when schools reopen. And while Marcellus’ experience pushed them in that direction, they actually made the final decision to do online learning after speaking to her sister-in-law, who is a teacher.

“I asked her how she feels about it, and she is scared,” Policik said of another conversation with a friend, also a teacher. “It just takes one parent to say, ‘Oh it’s just the sniffles,’ send their sick kid to school, and spread it like wildfire.”..."

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Lucille

“It just takes one parent to say, ‘Oh it’s just the sniffles,’ send their sick kid to school, and spread it like wildfire.”..."

I was a former school nurse. Parents sent their sick kids to school, seriously ill children, all the time. Mostly because they had no one to watch the child when they went to work. Other times it was because the child was trying for a perfect attendance prize given by the school. Some of them were too ill to even be in my clinic. I had one mom tell me she wasn't going to pick up her child because she had to go to court, the child was very ill. I told her if the child was not picked up in 30 minutes I would call Children's Protective Services (she showed up 15 minutes later).

My point is in even in the non Covid days sick children show up and by the time something is done to remove them from the school setting, it is too late. Most are bussed, they they go to the cafeteria for free breakfast and then to their classrooms. so by the time the teacher sees them and sends them to the clinic they have been close to many kids, the bus driver, the cafeteria staff, the teacher's aides that monitor the halls in the morning.

High schools often have clinics that have several rooms. Elementary clinics are mostly one room, so the ill children cannot really be isolated from other ill children in the clinic. So in elementary schools those kids are contacts as well.


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sjerin

I'm sorry if these questions have already been answered, but they occurred to me last night: If my school district is teaching only in-classroom, but I'm not comfortable sending my children there at this time, is there a penalty of some sort? And would I have to do the home teaching with no curriculum nor help of any kind? These are hypothetical questions for me as my kids are grown, but I'd like to know the answer(s) to them.

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maifleur03

sjerin contact your school district for home schooling suggestions. Your state board of education may also have a list of accepted in your state companies. In some states you must pay but others there may be away for the school or state to pay. If you think about it there are disabled children or those with cancers that can not be in a normal school setting. Each school district should have connections to provide education to these children.

Perhaps some of the people on here could mention which companies that they have or are planning on using.

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Elizabeth

Some schools have teachers only in the classroom. Students may remain at home and connect via the internet.

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bpath

Elizabeth, a problem arises when the teacher has children, who are doing remote learning in his/hers or another school. Perhaps the those children can come to the classroom, and work semi-unsupervised with noise-canceling headphones on? But if they are young enough (heck, if they are old enough!) they need supervision.

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nickel_kg

sjerin, every state has different laws about what is an acceptable home schooling curriculum. A quote from ProPublica website:


"Many states require parents to notify local school districts that their children will be homeschooled, but 11 states don't require parents to alert anyone. Most also don’t require tests or portfolio reviews as proof of educational progress."

There are many sources of curricula. My neighbors homeschooled for most of their kids elementary years, then the kids chose to go back to public schools.

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Elizabeth

According to a report published Monday by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children's Hospital Association, there has been a 90% increase in the number of coronavirus cases among US children over four weeks.

The new report, expected to be updated weekly, said there were 179,990 new Covid-19 cases among US children between July 9 and August 6.

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arcy_gw

Last evening our School Board declared YES it is safe and we are moving forward. One of the board members, a local physician spoke to the SCIENCE and the ramifications on students of NOT being in school: uptick in suicide/physical and sexual abuse as well as the lack of nutrition and education. He said we will be living with this for some time and we need to start dealing with it, hiding from it is not working for people over all. This is our world now. Tine to accept life as we have it NOW, even if and when tragedy may strike.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

And OTOH, the girl who took that viral photo of her HS hallway, the school that is now having to close because of infections, is being threatened over what she did...

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/10/us/paulding-school-crowded-halls-threats/index.html

"...The sophomore also said she On Sunday, she said she doesn't think the school would have addressed the issue as early as it did if she hadn't posted the image.

"We could have just delayed opening like many other schools," she said. "They kind of sent us to school and used us as guinea pigs to see what would happen later on."


The sophomore also said she understands that people want to have the option for in-school learning for a variety of reasons, and she does too, but it's just not safe yet.

"We're all pretty concerned about going back and I know a lot of my teachers are too. Because we all want to go to in person," Hannah said. "I have no intention of shutting the county down because I know a lot of people don't learn well online, I don't learn well online, and I want to be able to go to in person school and have some type of normality this year for my semester. But we can't if we're not safe."..."

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rob333 (zone 7a)

Choosing to send kids back to school is the most unAmerican thing one can do. To choose self over county is wrong. In this case, is wrong in the worst way.


Think what you want, but we all see.

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nickel_kg

Oh I think we're all wanting to go back to face to face living, no argument there. Where we differ is how safe is it now, here -- and on how much we're willing help a pretty serious virus spread in our communities. We're a big country, we might have different answers ... but it's a mighty big gamble to think the virus isn't capable of exploding even in your area. No one is that remote.

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LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

My son, who is about to start his senior year of university, was telling me the university's plan for the coming semester. For classes that meet 3 days a week they will have 1/3 of the students attend in person each day and 2/3 attending the lecture online. Classes that meet 2 days a week will have 1/2 the students in person each day and be held in larger classrooms than would be normal. Labs will be in person but the number of students in lab at one time would be limited and multiple times would be available per lab.

The school will re-evaluate the situation as the semester progresses.

This seems like a reasonable approach and I hope it is successful. He had a hard time LFH on a Calculus II course last semester but managed to squeak by with a C. Had he received a D he would have had to retake the course since it is a required course in his computer science major.

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Elmer J Fudd

lfh means what?

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Michele

Learning from home?

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LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

yes, learning from home

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Michele

Eager to get back? Yeah. Count me in. I’m eager too. I miss having get togethers. I long for it. My first grandson was born, and we can’t celebrate and share this once in a lifetime joy the way we would have. Birthdays, graduations, anniversaries have come and gone. We’re all so tired of it, but, there is no intelligent choice, other than waiting till there is a vaccine or cure. In the meantime, if we want to do our best to live to tell the tale, we must continue being vigilant.

Unfortunately, those who like to pretend it’s over are hurting us.

The truth is, even if (bite my tongue) every student missed one year, they’d be ok.

I for one want my grandson to live to be an old man. I want to live in this world as long as I can with him. I want my loved ones with me.


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socks

Michele, I so agree with you. It's about our kids and grandkids. My life has been good, and I wish the same for them. And to get together the way we want to, well, the price is too high. Although we do meet with them in the open garage, masks and distancing. My grandkids are doing well on lfh, but I know many kids are not. When school resumes, there will be a wide disparity among children, those who are working at grade level and those who are not. Poor teachers dealing with that.

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Kathsgrdn

Confusing recommendations here in Kentucky. Governor recommending schools don't open until the end of September but bars and restaurants can open to 50% capacity. The one story about the restaurants and bars opening up more is because they are worried that people will be having no social distancing/no masks house parties. Because adults are either too stupid to protect each other or they just don't care. I think it's both. I also think we aren't ever going to get back to normal because there are so many stupid people in this country who don't give a crap about anyone but themselves.

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sjerin

And what many "it's my choice to wear a mask or not" people don't seem to realize, is that had almost everyone been good about all the logical advice to get rid of this virus, we would be sending our kids to school right now without fear.

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Annegriet

My cousin got covid at school during teacher in-service. Masks were recommended but not required. She wore one to protect other people but sadly some people don't give a rat's a$$ about anybody else. We are very concerned for her.


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Annegriet

Masks work. They save lives.

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Annegriet

Agree with Elmer that Fauci is a national treasure. Look how great his baseball card is doing! https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/27/us/anthony-fauci-baseball-card-spt-trnd/index.html

As far as being a liar, well, that's just about the silliest thing I've ever heard. Trump lies multiple times each and every day. The Liar in Chief exceeded 20,000 lies to the American public on July 13th. https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/07/13/president-trump-has-made-more-than-20000-false-or-misleading-claims/

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Elmer J Fudd

The funny thing is, a few times in the past month a reporter has asked him about comments that fact checking found to be false and he ended the news conference and walked away.

The most recent one I saw was this week (I think) when he took credit for passing some act regarding veterans benefits that in fact was enacted in 2014. A reporter questioned his false statement, said why, and as a reaction Trump said "thank you", and walked out.

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sephia_wa

Yeah, to call Dr. Fauci a liar is absurd. Served under six presidents, received numerous awards, etc. Trump people say the most ridiculous things.

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HU-215578420

I don’t understand the tone of this thread. It’s not likely we can change each other’s minds, so perhaps we should agree to disagree. I understand some are very scared, and rightfully so, but the best we can do is to protect ourselves by taking the proper measures. If someone is comfortable wearing a mask and someone else isn’t, then stay away from each other (as in 6 ft away).

Likewise, I don’t believe there is one answer that ‘fits all’ with regard to in person or virtual learning. What’s best for a small, rural district with low positivity and cases is likely not what’s best for a hot spot area.

I do think the teachers unions have way too much power and control in my area. They had input into the district’s plan for school reopening. Once the plan was announced, they reneged on the agreement within days. Most of my husband’s family are active or retired teachers. When Covid eventually goes away or we have a vaccine and life returns to some semblance of normal, I’m sure they will complain about the lousy job parents did of teaching during the pandemic. They have already expressed concern that some parents are unenrolling their child(ren) from public school so they can homeschool on their own or enroll the child in a private school with in person learning. Their concern is the public schools will lose funding for every child that is unenrolled and the teachers could be facing layoffs. I’m thinking ‘welcome to the real world.’ Many of us (including teachers) thought it was just fine that the healthcare workers, grocery workers, food processing workers, etc. have worked throughout the pandemic. I’m tired of the teachers (at least my in-laws) denigrating other professions and parents and claiming how very special they are and no one has a worse life than they do. Good teachers are important as is education but I can do without the complaining.

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