How does YOUR garden grow?

annie1992

Dcarch posted pictures of the blossoms on his beans, and it looks like I am a couple of weeks ahead of him. My garden looks good today, we just weeded, LOL.

This is the south half, my garden is intersected by those apple trees:



Yes, there's a glare on my camera lens, I took this picture about an hour ago, facing west, into the setting sun. And, because I can only post one picture, this will be continued...

Annie

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annie1992

My beans are blossoming too, and making small pods. This is an heirloom beans called "Lina Cisco's Bird's Eye" bean. See that tiny pod right on top?


I also have small pods on my green beans and my onions are starting to bulb:



The Sugar Rush Peach hot peppers are as prolific as always:


This is the first small zucchini, ready to eat in another couple of days, it's about as big as my thumb:


The corn is starting to tassel, and it's taller than me. No short jokes, LOL.



And, of course, the tomato "jungle", which is well mulched but still has some grass that needs pulling.



These are Rutgers, they are always the first tomatoes:


We also have some eggplant, various cabbages including red, green and Napa, aspabroc, one brussels sprout that the groundhog left me, butternut and spaghetti squash, Pontiac potatoes, watermelon, muskmelon, rutabaga, beets both red and golden, cucumbers, kale, collards and something called Peking Taching Kou Pai Tsai, which grew quickly, stayed mild and we had some for supper.

If the weather holds and the garden god smile on me, there will be some good meals and lots of canning coming up.

Next up, garlic! I think it'll be ready to harvest in about 2 weeks, maybe sooner!

Annie







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nanelle_gw (usda 9/Sunset 14)

You folks have big, beautiful gardens! Mine is almost all containers.



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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Wow Annie! Fabulous garden. Our green beans are pretty much done. If the hot weather breaks for a few days we will pull the plants & replant. IF - LOL. Silver Queen corn is 7' tall for the most part. Silks are out so hoping the nice breeze we've had the last couple of days will do its thing. Once it looks like most of the pollen has fallen we will coat the plants with Surround (kaolin clay) in an effort to thwart the blankety-blank-blank stink bugs. We've been harvesting cherry tomatoes for a couple of weeks from the mini and patio plants, the full-size cherry tomato plants are loaded with greenies and the slicers have anything from baseball-size down to pea; in this heat I'm surprised anything has set. We have pulled a couple of nice Magda squash, but several of my plants got uprooted/killed by the feral cats. Grrr. So far the cantaloupe plants are all male blossoms, they need to invite some girls to the party! Lots and lots of herbs. All-in-all I love this time of year.

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Nanelle_gw, your tubs are gorgeous. Everything looks nice and healthy!

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annie1992

Nanelle, not one darned thing wrong with container gardening, all my herbs are in raised beds that Elery (my husband) built for me. That first picture is half of my garden, this is the other half:


Every year Elery tells me it's a waste of space to plant potatoes, they are so cheap here. He's probably right, but I plant them every year anyway, LOL.

Thanks Edie. I planted two rows of green beans, a couple of weeks apart, hoping that I'd have time to deal with one before the other one came into full swing. Sometimes I just get so tired of picking and canning green beans that I give up and pull the plants and feed them to the cows, they are one of the things here that just keep going...

Annie

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Lars

Nice to see photos of your farm - that does bring back pleasant and fond memories.

I don't have much to show, although I do have a lot of fruit on my white sapote tree at the moment, and I told my neighbor that she should pick whatever gets ripe. I think I gave one to Elery when we visited. They don't have all that much flavor, especially compared to the cherimoya I have, but I only have one fruit on that tree this year, as I was away during the hand pollinating season😞

Here's a photo of my banana tree, I think it is still months away from producing ripe bananas

The bananas will be very small, but there will be a lot of them.

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LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

Annie - I quit picking my beans after about 17 lbs. We went to Wisconsin for 6 days over the holiday and when we got back most of the beans were over-mature. I'll leave the plants in and pick the beans for seed after the pods dry. I have some Emerite pole beans that are blooming and should be ready for the first harvest in a week or 2 if the Japanese Beetles don't destroy the plants first.

All of the cool season stuff has been harvested already...broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, beets, greens, etc.

Pickling cukes are producing but not yet in enough quantity to warrant making a batch.

Deer severely pruned my tomatoes before I put a stop to it. We will get enough for fresh eating (first BLTs for dinner tonight, yay!) but not enough for sauce or salsa. I still have a dozen pints of Annie's salsa left from last year but might buy enough canning tomatoes from a market gardener to make a batch or 2.

I am having my best early pepper season that I can remember. All of the plants are healthy and loaded. Still waiting for the first ripe bell though.

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party_music50

I love garden and pet photos! lol!

Wow, Annie, your gardens are ideal!!! So beautiful.

nanelle, your container garden is amazing! I grow a lot of ornamentals in containers, but also some very hot peppers, mints, lettuces, etc. This year I decided to try eggplant in containers because my season isn't long enough for the eggplants to mature in ground. These plants are by far the best I've ever grown and are loading up with huge flowers right now! I might go to more container gardening. :)

Lars, I'm envious of the plants you are able to grow there. Your bananas are beautiful!

It's been very hot (90s) for weeks and weeks, and we've only had .2" of rain that entire time. Lawns are dead, and plants and trees have been very stressed, but we FINALLY just got rain!!! nearly 3" in a little over 24 hrs, and we really needed it! I have many small gardens / garden areas and always pack too much in. :) Here's one veg garden on June 6 that I still wasn't finished planting. Those are Egyptian Walking Onions on the upper-left, lettuces on upper right, hot peppers in the middle, herbs & peas on right, etc.

And here it is this morning in the rain. The lettuce was wonderful this year but is setting seed early, hot peppers are producing but the Portugal long hots are the skinniest and longest I've ever grown. lol! Herbs are nice this year, as are the snow peas, but I've had to spend a lot of time watering.

I started a few Stupice tomatoes at the end of Feb to see if I could pick earlier and it was a success. I've been picking tomatoes since early July.

These snowpeas are the sweetest of any I've ever grown.

My lettuce about to bloom, herbs at far end, and a few stray plants :) Random wire cages are to discourage squirrels from digging.

Some of the wild grape vines that showed up a few years ago, so I helped them along. I love wild grape jelly!!!


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Martha Scott

My garden is herbs and flowers and is all raised beds. Small city lot!


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cloudy_christine

Oh, I love the wattle fencing, party_music! Did you make it or buy it?

Everyone's garden looks great!

Martha, nice design with the bricks and beds.


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party_music50

Thank you, cloudy_christine! I grow willow for basket weaving and made the fence with the stuff that isn't good enough for weaving. :)

ETA: here's one of my early practice baskets... it shows how beautiful the willow is. :) I grow 4 varieties.


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nanelle_gw (usda 9/Sunset 14)

That's very cool @party_music50! I'm wondering if you have to preserve them in some way, or if they stand up to weather as is.


I just noticed this has a "cooking" tag. Here's a few edible gardening close ups.



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cloudy_christine

Party_music, that basket is really lovely!

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party_music50

nanelle, your plants all look wonderful!!! Re preserving the willow, I never have. I make garden art sometimes... I'm in z5 w/ harsh winters, and untreated willow that's left out in the elements all year round will only last 2 or 3 years before starting to break down. If it's protected at all it will last much longer. I have a spot of misfit plants near my compost pit and I stick the old/broken trellises back there... it's sort of a test to see how they last. These are many years old. lol! Spheres seem to last longer, so the shape/function makes a difference.



Thank you, cloudy_christine! Willow is amazing stuff -- it makes great baskets.

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cindy_z6b/7a VA

I also love your basket, Party-music! We had a willow tree but it suddenly died a few years ago and we're not sure why.

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bcskye

Party-music, love your basket and your garden. My late husband and I made wild grape wine with just the juice from the grapes and sugar one year and it was so mild and delicious. I was so disappointed when we moved here over thirty-five years ago and found out some kind of a blight or something had gone through and none of the grapevines produced fruit. Still have gorgeous grapevines every year, but no grapes.

My garden this year is in containers on the south facing porch. Have a handful of gr. beans ready to pick, a zucchini bigger than yours, Annie, lots of blossoms on all the squash, tomatoes and cukes. The frying peppers have a lot ready to pick and a lot more blossoms. The other peppers are doing well as re the onions and hopefully the carrots. Didn't plant corn this year so I'll be buying that. For Annie's salsa, I've already ordered Roma tomatoes from my favorite farm. Whatever I get off my plants will be for fresh eating and maybe some sauce.

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annie1992

Lars, those bananas are impressive, especially to a Michigan girl. The garden this year is much the same as it was last year, so nothing new for you to see, LOL. Except that right now the weeds have been pulled!

Nanelle, that's a beautiful striped tomato!

PM, your fence is a lot prettier than mine. You can't see mine, it's just strands of electric fence that starts about 3 inches above ground. I've found that groundhogs can't jump, so it keeps them out until they become very aggressive and just blast through the fence. The deer avoid it, but nothing keeps out the gophers, chipmunks, voles, moles, field mice, rabbits, raccoons, possums and an occasional errant chicken! I had a big willow tree but it fell in the pond and we had to have it winched out. I have lots of small willow "whips" around the top pond, is that what you use? As always, your baskets are lovely, that's just one more thing I've never tried to do...

Madonna, don't give up on those grapevines. My grandpa planted some at least 50 years ago and for some reason there were no grapes for decades. About 3 years ago, the grapes started coming back. My two remaining elderly aunts got so excited, LOL, and they promptly picked them all! I have one single seedless concord vine for jam and juice, but I haven't quite got the hang of how to prune it or trellis it, so I don't get many grapes, just lots of vines and leaves...

Martha, my herbs are here next to the house, Elery built me two boxes on legs, about 4 feet tall so it's easy to weed and water. One has basil, a mix of Thai, cinnamon and Genovese:


The other has three super hot peppers, one Death Spiral, one Scorpion and one Ghost, along with some fennel that needs desperately to be thinned:


The remaining herbs are planted along the front of the house, including curry, rosemary, sage, lemon basil, tarragon, thyme, dill, parsley and cilantro, with some calendula, a rose bush and some stray milkweed that I left for the Monarch butterflies.


I do have flowers in the front, LOL:


Annie


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KatieC

Party Music, I love your fence. Mine has to be 7'...that'd be a lot of weaving, lol.

Not much to see yet, it's still early for me. Everything's doing well, though. The only thing that didn't come up well was chard...go figure. We're trying a new liquid organic fertilizer that can feed through our trickle tape (high octane fish fertilizer I think). My tomatoes are blooming like crazy.

Strawberries, blueberries, apples, pears and cherries in the back. It's a good berry year.

Tomatoes in one tunnel, peppers, eggplant and couple of tomatillos in the short one. I only planted about half my space...the rest is cover crop, halfway tilled under. Raspberries, some new grape plants and an asparagus patch hiding behind the tunnels.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

Envious of all the beautiful bounty! This is our down season. It's too hot to even go outside right now. My beds and pots are all straggly and weedy, but I do still have some herbs that I use often and Egyptian onions ditto, 1 tiny pineapple ripening, and lots of macadamia nuts on my tree that will be ready later on. Fruit flies get to the papayas this time of year, sadly. and the birds are stealing all my blackberries and Barbados cherries. August is about the time I restart.

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party_music50

Thank you, all!

cindy_7, I think it's hard to kill any willow... except maybe if it didn't get enough water?

bcskye, I almost tried squash in a container this year but decided it was a bad idea -- now I'm thinking otherwise. What I have in containers is doing great and I think it's because I was able to keep the pots on a covered/warmer porch during the really cold weather we had in late May and early June. Or maybe it's because I give them some fertilizer. lol! Maybe I'll try a few more different things in containers next year.

Annie, I watched in amazement as a deer showed up 3 nights in a row last week, shortly before dark, and proceeded to eat every apple off my tree that he/she could reach. Then another showed up yesterday and ate my tall phlox. lol! I get the occasional deer, and have lots of rabbits, squirrels, chipmunks, skunks... :O) Re the willow, I grow varieties of Salix purpurea -- basketry willow. It's not the same as weeping willow, but could be what you call a pussy willow.

KatieC, those are nice gardens and gorgeous views. Where are you located? My blackberries are doing fantastic this year and I figure it's because we didn't have our usual harsh winter.


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annie1992

KatieC, I'd swap you greens for tomatillos, mine just died. The other thing that didn't do well was carrots, they just never came up at all and I've never had trouble growing carrots before. Too hot? Too cold? Too dry? Who knows...

That's the first time I've seen a picture of your gardens/yard, what gorgeous scenery with those mountains in the back.

It's a good berry year here too, if the blasted chipmunks would leave me a single red strawberry, sheesh, they do NOT share well.

I'm going to plant more lettuce, spinach, mizuna and probably beets in my "hoop houses" for a fall crop, see if I can extend my growing season into October or November. Elery built them on top of raised beds, the tops are hinged and I can just pick them up by the handle and open or close them, very handy.

This was not quite finished, he put eye bolts in the building and added hooks to the "lids", then using a piece of chain I can open the lid and keep it open by hooking the chain to the eyebolts, or keep the lid from blowing open in the wind by hooking a short piece of chain, one end on the hook on the lid and the other end to the hook on the raised box. Works great, protects the contents from the marauding deer at night and has already made it through a couple of spring storms with 50+ mile wind gusts. We'll see how cold beets and spinach can get under the hoop this fall.

Annie

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nanelle_gw (usda 9/Sunset 14)

@carolb_fl_coastal_9b it is crazy hot here too, 103 for the last few days, but 60 or less at night, and dry, not humid. I think too often people lump warm climates together but it seems to me they're different.

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Islay Corbel


mine's so small and jammed together lol. Rhubarb, kale, cabbage, mangetout, squashes, herbs, tomatoes, sprouting cauliflowers, nasturtiums, wild flowers.......

I've loved seeing all your great gardens!

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

I wish night time temps were as cool as out west! The lows have been in the 80s 😓

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cindy_z6b/7a VA

party-music - That's also what I heard. This tree was about 20 yards from our creek and in one of the wetter areas of our land. Maybe it was too wet?? The deer used to eat any branch they could reach.

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Some shots of our garden today

We've never had corn this tall. Some of those stalks are over 7 feet! It looks white because DH sprayed them against earworms and stinkbugs. And if we're lucky the deer won't like it either.

Part of our "Tomato Jungle." The Pink Ponderosa has some nice-sized ones coming on.

Potted herbs right outside the kitchen door.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

So thankful we have our gardens. Even with covid brain fog I can take a walk to my garden and fuss a bit. I gave up years ago trying to predict why what did well and why what did great, and why something failed. As long as I put in many varieties, I get a full seasons harvest. But so unpredictable.

That looks like GreenZebra. RozellaPurple is from the DwarfProject. Very nice dark brown like CherokeePurple. I'm deep in Craig's project. A half dozen at about F6. A half dozen of my own bred crosses. A dozen micro toms. Can be grown year round. We are looking for something larger than a cherry....fun project. All are under 12 inches.

First year in many I have no motivation to take pics of my garden. Just do not want my cell phone with me like in the past. Beeps, calls, texts....no thanks.

Annie, my carrots had a no-show as well. I've been researching Fall crops and extending my season. I harvested a few cloves of garlic, divided, and stuck it right back in the ground. 😂I have so much that experimenting is not a big deal.

Love willow and weaving. I have a really old fella willow. But not here at this property.

We have every destructive critter known. The worst was the porcupine that sent both pups to the emergency with hundreds of tiny quills all in and over their mouths. A mountain lion and a teen bear in my pear tree....possums are junk foragers. Garbage lovers and destroy just about all plants they cross.

This is starting to sound depressing, 😂

Old pic, but my garden is still like this and very calming/therapy. As long as I just let nature do what it will. Accept some failures since a good percentage will thrive.





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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

The pavers look decorative but the first few years they sunk and disappeared so a new layer had to be placed on top. Muddy Springs. Raised beds was the only way...friends and neighbors could not plant for weeks in traditional rows. To much muddy spring weather. Most gave up. Shade frames cut down on hot days and cut down on storm heavy rain. Salads all summer with 50% shade. Hail storms diverted. Fresh seeding does not wash out, or dry out with shade to germinate.


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KatieC

Party Music, I'm in the Idaho panhandle. Blackberries are the one thing I miss. When I was a kid in Portland we picked tons of them that grew behind the fire station. I finally got one plant to live, but the berries were pretty pitiful last year.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Reminds me I need to check my raspberries.

Annie, Fall crops are a new territory for me. I always test a few things but have never planned ahead. We are usually spent by late August/early September dealing with late harvests, fruit trees, cleaning up beds. Making sauces, dehydrating....

This is the tray I started a few days ago.


Then I came across this cold climate list by month. (I've never purchased their seed or have ever heard about them before). Link, HERE

So, I need to go through my seeds again, (and organize anyway), and plan another tray since I have so much time,😩

I don't want to go overboard, so my two salad beds might be just the ticket. I like the idea of some hearty greens and ten feet long down the middle, some bush peas. Where the cold frames have the most height.

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

It's so gratifying to see so many of you have such amazing gardens.

Having a garden allows you to recycle/compost. Gardening work keeps your body strong, Food from the garden keeps you healthy, especially during this pandemic.

re: willow for art - I used to put willow sticks in a metal can and bake at high heat until they become charcoal sticks. I used them for drawings. You can also buy them.

re: Willow medicinal - Sometimes folk medicine can be amazing. Willow is used for pain management in folk medicine. They have found that the active compound in willow is the same as in aspirin.

re: Dwarf tomatoes - I used to grow Silvery Fir Tree. Very pretty potted indoors.

re: Dwarf tomatoes and Craig's project. - Sleevan, I am sure you have grown LGS (Lime Green Salad). I just had a LGS salad for lunch. Also very pretty grown indoor.

That book was Dr. Carolyn Male's book. She gave it to me. She passed away last year. Sad! I have had fun growing tomatoes in pots (made from soda bottles.)





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party_music50

yes, dcarch, I've made charcoal from my willow. It works great. I also gave willow sticks to my friend for her dog when she was teething, and her dog loved it, but her Vet recommended not using it since she didn't know the dosage. :p

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Yes, Carolyn was such a pistol. She still sits on my shoulder when I do something in my garden she would disapprove of, 😂.

Tragic how she was treated the few weeks before her passing. I don't think she was ready to go at that time.

I do have about two hundred micro tomatoes going now. Minor obsession and have a few at F8. Dwarf project is slowing down via Craigs book project but I'm still going forward with a few I think are promising.

We are working on a multiflora micro that is not a cherry but a bigger golfball or bigger. Still barely blushing but looks promising. I have one tray that needs potting up for the Fall/Winter grow. In September I'll start another 'hunt' tray with what looks promising. Only good flavor goes forward.


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Jasdip

Huge, gorgeous gardens!!!! And lush!!! I can't imagine the work going into planting and weeding, then the canning and preserving!!

My garden consists of an herb plant, and mint plants. I had a spearmint plant that wasn't doing great so I asked for on from Freecycle. I was given some but they're peppermint, and they're kind of struggling as well.

A lady was asking for some cloth remnants and I had several of leftover t-shirts, shirts and pants from hubby's quilt. So in return she gave me some spearmint plants. So I hope it thrives, it looks good.

I tried growing rosemary for a number of years but it never gets tall and soft and lacy, always short with hard stems. Not nice at all so I didn't even bother this year. I strive for Edie's rosemary!


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bcskye

Annie, I tried seedless Concord grapes and another type of grape for a couple of years in a row and none survived so I just figured the good Lord didn't feel I was worthy of growing them so gave up.

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Jasdip, thank you! That Rosemary is 3 years old and has never been transplanted out of that pot. I keep it watered in the heat, fertilize it occasionally and bring it in the house during the winter - I do use it some in the winter but I don't over-prune it since it is kinda in hibernation. It loves the heat but not the cold.

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beesneeds

Been in a bit of illness again, and a just coming home from much needed round of "vacation".. so my garden is growing weedy, lol.

But just harvested the garlic crop today while it was dry. The tomatoes and peppers are growing like crazy, and I need to seriously pinch back my basil and make some pesto.

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annie1992

PM, I have lots of willow growing by the upper pond, not a weeping willow like the one that just fell in the lower pond by the house, and not pussy willow. We used to call it "willow switches" and Grandpa used them for dousing wells. I could see weaving something with those. I wonder if they are similar?

I did see a baby bobcat in the barn a couple of days ago, so I guess I do actually have a "barn cat"! And these were visiting today:


sleevendog, your garden is nice and soothing, there's just something about gardens that seem calm and peaceful. Possums are destructive but they eat something like 2000 ticks a year, so I am kinder to them than I am to the groundhogs! 200 micro-tomatoes? Yeah, that's enough, LOL. And I also need to organize my seeds, I'm getting so many just jumbled together.

Islay, the closer the plants are together, the less room there is for weeds, so it's good!

Edie, that corn is impressive and your Pink Ponderosa is far ahead of my tomatoes. Nice "jungle", LOL. And your rosemary is better than mine too, I've never managed to overwinter one so every year I have to plant a new one, and so it never gets very big.

Jasdip, Ashley has bought me several mint plants, including chocolate mint and spearmint. It will NOT grow in a pot for me, no matter what I do or where I put it. I had some escape the pot and grow along the house and it's doing great, but everything in the pot is dead. I guess it grows where it wants to.

Madonna, I have a LOT of vines, and I always get grapes, but they don't get enough sun or airflow or something, and so they always get moldy or stay tiny. I have that one concord and another one called Canadice that never gets any bigger, never gets grapes on it, just hangs around. It doesn't die but it doesn't do anything either. I'm definitely not successful at grapes!

beesneeds, I hope you are feeling better. And, you remind me that tomorrow I have to go up and check the garlic, it should be ready to pull any time now.

dcarch, those soda bottle planters are pretty creative! Here they have a 10 cent deposit on bottles, but I think the planters are probably worth 10 cents. The kids might think that's a fun craft...

Elery picked these today:

I thinned the fennel, now I've got to find something to do with these little baby fennel bulbs. I also thinned rutabaga, but the cows got those and they were happy.


Annie


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party_music50

Here's my willow patch! There's a small hill that dips down from the garage, and this spot is the wettest area of my yard (creek not far away), so the perfect place for it. I coppice it every year, so this is all growth from this season... it's about 7' high at this point and still growing. I've included some closeups too.




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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Today's harvest:

1/2 the pepper went into fajitas for DH. Salad lunch tomorrow - yum!

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party_music50

yum! Are those Sungolds? :) I only have ripe Stupice at this point because I started them extra early.

The squash looks interesting. What is it?

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

The tomatoes are: Yellow Patio and the red is Red Robin. RR is the tiniest little plant I've ever seen, about 8" high. Yellow Patio is about 3'. Both of them put out full-size cherries. They bore early and for their size are quite prolific. Too bad they don't have near as much flavor as Sungold or Black Cherry. I think they are just about done but that's OK. They got us through from late spring until now when my real tomatoes are starting to kick into gear.

The squash is Magda. Similar to a zucchini but not nearly as watery when cooked. I've grown it every year for probably 8 or 9 years now. Always the first to bear and fairly prolific if the bugs leave it alone.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Your squash looks good!

A variety I'm not familiar. Magda. I have a dozen varieties I plant willy-nilly. And hope for the best. I get plenty every year. Then save seed. Just found a small spot to add a few seeds last week. Maybe too late but I always try new things. Just might have a hot long Fall like recent years.

Probably the first year in many I don't seem to have sun gold. 200 other plants should keep us happy in a few weeks.

My best early patio tomatoes are Terenzo(sp) and Lizzano(sp). Hybrids. The only hybrids I purchase every few years. I can start them early and fit 3 plants in a 3-4 gallon grow bag. On a chair or pedestal on the kitchen deck. Excellent flavor. I just let them cascade.


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party_music50

I've picked a lot of Stupice tomatoes already, and finally got my first two Sungolds yesterday. I have to have Sungolds. :) I've also been picking zucchini and crookneck summer squash for weeks. My green beans are just now ready to pick -- they had to be replanted because the first sowing of seeds never came up. Too wet and cold then, and now it's just too hot and dry. lol!

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

My Estler's Mortgage Lifters are finally starting to set little tomatoes. Hopefully most of them will get big. I need some for seed.

My volunteer cherry that is mixed in with the zinnias is growing like crazy. Still not sure what they are.

Lost 2 of my cucumbers but the rest are hanging on and producing, as is the Magda squash. PattyPans are pathetic though.

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agmss15

Your gardens all look wonderful! My garden is kind of pitiful this year. I got stuff planted so late. We had two late snow storms and then drought. I am working on getting in fall crops in now. I have harvested a dozen or so each Sungolds and Shishito peppers. Lots of radishes and greens. It looks like I will have a ton of Carmen peppers plus some others that I was given free seed - Flaming Flare and Hot Paper Lantern.

Non edible - but my Delphinium put on quite a show this year.

The peace and frankly hard physical work of gardens seem extra important this year.


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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

Not sure what's going on this year. Lots of tomatoes, all huuuuge!


These are not the biggest. The biggest had been given away to friends and family.

I will be dehydrating a lot.


dcarch

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

dcarch, varieties?

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party_music50

dcarch, it must be the weather... my Stupice are huge this year. My other varieties aren't close to ripening yet though. :p

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

"ediej1209 AL Zn 7

dcarch, varieties?"

Carbon, German Pink, Ox Heart.

"party_music50

----------- my Stupice are huge this year. My other varieties aren't close to ripening yet though. :p"

Where do you live, the North Pole? Hahaa!

As of today, leftover tomatoes after given away 7 large boxes to friends and family, cooking, and eating tomatoes for breakfast, lunch and dinner everyday.

dcarch

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party_music50

almost.

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annie1992

PM, I haven't gotten a single ripe tomato yet either. Lots of green ones, but even the SunGolds aren't showing any color.

The garlic did well this year, though...


and Mother and I have snapped a couple of pickings of green beans, we've eaten them and I canned 13 quarts so far:


Of course, there's zucchini. Lots and lots of zucchini:


Annie

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Well, it's a good thing we picked what we did when we did. We had an overnight thunderboomer and couldn't hear anything over it. The blasted raccoons got in and ate EVERY ear of corn left. I'm just sick.

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party_music50

omg. Edie, do they knock down the stalks to get to the ears? Squirrels always get my corn here, so I gave up trying.

Annie, that garlic is huge. What variety? My garlic was just ok this year, but considering how bad our autumn/early winter and early spring were, I'm happy. I picked and ate my first two Sungolds on Monday and they're starting to ripen faster now. My Sweet 100s are starting to ripen too.

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

Bad! Preparing battles!

All squash plants died. squash borers.

95% garlic rotted. Garlic white rot!

Both are tough pest problems. Especially white rot. I hope no one gets it. If you do, you almost have to give up. White rot stays in your soil for more than 20 years. So crop rotation is not going to work.

You can use heat to sanitize garlic cloves before planting. Heat up to 115F, 120F can kill your garlic.

Sous vide!!! perfect temperature control. But have to think of a way to heat up tons of earth.

Suggestions?

dcarch


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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

dcarch, can you spread a couple of layers of black plastic over the area, weigh the edges down well and leave it for the sun to "cook" it for a couple of years? I know, it's the pits to lose a section of garden that you've spent time and $ amending and tilling. I am so sorry! :-(

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annie1992

dcarch, that's terrible, I'm sorry. Ugh. I just tend to move stuff around, but I have 85 acres, so that's doable for me, something doesn't do well in one spot, it gets a new spot. The first couple of years a new spot is tough, but a couple of years of cow manure tilled in and it gets pretty good. The only thing I've been unsuccessful consistently with is parsnips/turnips/rutabaga/radishes. The root maggots get them every year, no matter what I do.

PM, the variety is "Music". It's what Michigan State University tells me grows best here, and they were right so far. I save the biggest cloves each year for next year's seed, and I plan to expand my current bed of 150 to 250 next year, somehow we manage to use every head I grow. I use it fresh until it starts to sprout, then I slice and dehydrate it and turn it into garlic powder. I used the last of mine over a month ago and I get pretty stingy when I start running out, LOL.

Still waiting for that first tomato.....

Annie


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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

ediej1209 AL Zn 7, in fact I will be doing something like that. Here is my plan:

1. Check weather report forecast for the hottest day.

2. On the hottest day, pour lots of boiling water down the soil. Lots and lots.

3. Cover with black plastic.

4. Cover black plastic with clear Twinwall insulating green house plastic panel to trap solar heat.

5. When the sun goes down, put foam insulation panel on top of greenhouse panel.

5. Repeat this the next day.

I will find out next year if that works.

Annie, 85 acres! Wow! That is almost as big as some country. (Vatican).

dcarch

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KatieC

I feel your pain.That's as bad as losing them to voles. I live on a meadow that's 40' of peat floating on water. I used to screen it and cook in an old turkey roaster. Even doing enough for seed starting mix was too labor intensive.

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beesneeds

You might be better off using clear instead of black plastic to solarize the bed. Clear plastic gets the soil hotter, black plastic is good for cutting light but not as good as clear for heating. If you can get a solar pool cover for on top of the clear plastic, that can help raise the soil temp too. Usually a few weeks to a few months is needed to really bake the soil good.

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annie1992

Well, dcarch, 85 acres IS a lot, but 30 of that is pasture for the cows, so I can't plant there, and 30 more is hay for the cows to eat in the winter, so I can't plant there either! Two ponds take up another 5 acres, so now I'm getting down there, with another couple of acres taken up by fruit trees. Where my garden is now used to be barnyard, I do tend to move pasture/barnyard fence around indiscriminately. The property is shaped like a big "L", with the barns on one end and the house on the other. So, the house has the ponds and raspberries, asparagus, strawberries, my little hoophouses and the garlic and horse radish. The "main garden" is on the other end with the barns and there are cows in the middle. (grin) And that's how raccoons manage to eat my chickens, those are on the end with the barns, furthest away from the house....

Good luck cooking that soil. How are you going to boil that much water?

Annie

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Jasdip

Wow, DC, that's the sh*ts!!! To lose everything in one year!

Good luck with the plastic, that makes sense to me as the best way to heat up the earth.

Beesneeds, I wouldn't have thought clear heats up better than black.

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

We actually tried that once with clear plastic and what we ended up with was like a 1" high "greenhouse" full of weeds growing sideways. I gave up and just threw grass seed over the area and moved my garden to a different spot.

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party_music50

I just watched a large black swallowtail butterfly (black w/ blue trim) flit along my gardens, stopping repeatedly at multiple plants to lay her eggs! Every year their caterpillars eat my dill and parsley, but this year she especially liked my sweet basil and lettuce too. lol!

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

p-m50, last year I "sacrificed" my potted parsley to a yellow swallowtail. Her offspring, of course, ate every leaf, no surprise there. The surprise came when I realized the plant itself was still alive and regenerating. I brought it inside for the winter and it is currently still growing out on the deck, and I do use from it quite a bit. Tougher than it looks! So far, though, I haven't really seen any of our flutter-bys stopping to check it out.

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

Annie, allow me to hijack your thread just one more time.

Two items:

1. Make sure you order your garlic bulbs for growing form a certified safe source, or you may end up having to come up with a better way than mine to deal with the garlic white rot problem.

  1. Here is what I am doing: Since heat is supposed to be effective to kill off those nasty fungus, based on solar collector design, I first lay down black weed control fabric then using Twinwall insulated greenhouse panel to put on top. After half of a day of sun exposure, the top one inch soil measured at 121 F. I will do this a few more days to build up subsoil temperature, then I will pour boiling water over the weed control fabric, which is porous.

Wish me luck.

dcarch


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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

dcarch, best of luck. I hope this works well, but sorry you have to go through this. :-(

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Dcarch, we never expect every year to go smoothly as gardeners. Plant more, plant in succession, cull if all goes well. Start a tray of back-ups. Start a few early trays if the weather permits early plantings. (seeds are cheap)

But you know that.

Every year I get a punch-in-the-face problem. With covid we need more than average successes...

I'm having a good year, knock on forehead.

I was going to suggest your twin-wall. (you used it for your figs)

It is expensive. but if you have it...

You might be hesitant to do raised beds? It is the only thing that works for us. I bake a few beds every year for an entire season, covered. Not a big planned rotation but it helps.

Early Springs are so wet, raised beds let me plant early. Contains my rich compost soil where it needs to be. Good drainage.

I'm not convinced your garlic was diseased. Wet feet will rot them like some seasons where my early peas rot first plantings. (even in raised beds)

2x12's are cheap for a few raised beds. Warmed beeswax will preserve brushed onto the surfaced buried into the soil.

Not preaching, but in the NorthEast, this works so well for us.





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Jasdip

I picked up 3 ears of corn at a produce stand today. It was nice and sweet with plump kernels. Might be a good corn year.

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annie1992

dcarch, I save "seed garlic" from my crop every year for next year's planting. I did buy the first planting's worth, but seed garlic is pretty expensive.

Jasdip, my sweet corn is doing extremely well, we've eaten a couple of meals including sweet corn. The local farmer's market is getting $8 a dozen for corn, $7 if you buy 5 dozen. Whew, I'm glad I grew some, I ought to let the kids sell corn out by the pole barn!

PM, I've let the monarchs have the fennel, and I left some milkweeds growing in my herb garden. It's ugly, but I've gotten a least a dozen of these:

The kids don't call it the herb garden any more, now they call it the "butterfly garden", LOL. I've got butterflies all over the place, but they seldom land long enough for me to get a picture, but I did sneak up on this one. Not a monarch, but still pretty:


And I finally got ripe tomatoes. Just a couple, but Elery's doing the happy dance.

Annie



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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Annie, I love the Yellow Swallowtails! Like bits of sunshine dancing on the breeze. We've only had one big one ripe so far but I pulled another at breaker stage yesterday. I trust neither the critters nor the weather!

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party_music50

I saw a little caterpillar on one of my parsley a couple hours ago, so the plant-stripping should begin soon. :) We got some rain on Tuesday and my small tomatoes started to ripen like crazy, so I'm loaded up with Stupice, Sungold, Sweet 100, and Gold Nugget already. Even my blackberries are starting to show tinges of color.

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party_music50

Hi everyone! I've tried to post to this thread a couple times recently but the post would just evaporate into thin air. Trying again -- without photos -- just to see if it posts. :)

ETA: Now I'll try adding photos. I found a few swallowtail caterpillars the other day... one went for dill, one went for fresh parsley, and one went for green parsley seed! The photos are from the day I found them. This first little caterpillar on my fresh parsley is much bigger now and has been doing a good job of stripping the plant clean, the dill disappeared, and I'm glad that I had several parsley plants started for seed. :)

My gardens are producing lots and lots of tomatoes and hot peppers now! More new varieties are ripening every day. They're both especially nice and tasty this year. My green beans were sad this year, though.. half didn't even sprout -- poor things had bad weather conditions at crucial times for them. Temps were 40s and wet when trying to sprout, then 90s and bone dry when they were ready to flower. :( Sweet peppers are slow, but coming. Zucchini and crookneck are still producing plenty. lol! Overall, we're having a hot and dry summer for us -- probably only getting 1/4 our usual rainfall.

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annie1992

PM, I'll try some pictures, here's my lastest garden harvest:

Edie, I like the Yellow Swallowtails too, and in recognition of my quest for the Monarchs, this one visited my flowers:

Mother helped me snap green beans for canning, I've done 30 quarts so far. That's a 5 gallon bucket, nearly full:


Jasdip, my corn did well, and, of course, there is the zucchini. This picking also included aspabroc, onions and golden beets:

And it looks like this posted normally. I even went back to edit!

Annie

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

We're down to tomatoes, a few cucumbers here and there, and bell peppers coming on along with 5 or 6 varieties of basil. I need to get making pesto! Raccoons got all our corn after the first picking, bugs got the beans and squash. :-( Oh well... I'm just grateful for what we have!

Annie, haven't seen any Monarchs yet but my zinnia bed was full of Viceroys this morning. Along with a Black Swallowtail and some Painted Ladies.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

Lovely harvests! The only things I'm harvesting right now are macadamia nuts, which need to dry for a month, some herbs and walking onions. I have a lot of basil that needs to be made into pesto

And fyi, the caterpillars on the fennel are the same as the ones on parsley - and anything else in the carrot family. Common name is 'parsleyworm', and adult is this very pretty black swallowtail.

Monarch caterpillars only eat milkweeds - and have little black wiggly protrusions on each end.

P.S. If you poke or disturb a parsleyworm, it will protrude little orange 'horns' that spray an icky scent in defense.


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annie1992

Carol, I'm sorry, I was unclear. Yes, I left a big ugly milkweed that falls over onto my walkway just for the monarchs, and diligently picked off all the tussock moths so the monarchs could have it. I counted 6 Monarch caterpillars on the milkweed, like this one:

Elery is just waiting for the caterpillars to be all gone, so he can chop out that 5 foot tall milkweed, LOL. It IS ugly, but I've been jealously guarding it, as long as there is a caterpillar there. It appears that they are all gone, both from the milkweed and from the fennel, so both types.

edie, I find it hard to tell the Monarchs from the Viceroys when they are landed with their wings folded. I mostly can see the markings when their wings are spread. Whichever butterfly that is, it still makes me happy. And they are polka dotted, how fashionable. (grin)

I've only seen one Black Swallowtail this year, I think being in farm country too many farmers spray too much "stuff" on too many things. Ugh. Somehow the gypsy moths and Japanese beetles survive it, though, and about a zillion cabbage moths! Plus the tomato hornworms, which I callously feed to the chickens, they love them.

Not nearly as pretty, but much more beneficial, I had this visitor yesterday, sunning himself on the front pavers. I'm not at all afraid of snakes and we don't have venomous ones here other than the very shy and endangered Massasagua. This one was about 3 feet long, big for a garter snake, and was in the process of digesting a small mouse. See the "belly bulge" at the far left of the picture?

Annie

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Garter snakes are truly our friends! And so are Black Snakes but sadly I can't convince anyone in my husband's family of that.

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Lars

I grew up with a lot of venomous snakes, like water moccasins (AKA cottonmouth), rattlesnakes, coral snakes, and copperheads. I wasn't really afraid of snakes except when they came into the house - that was too close for comfort. I had to avoid the water moccasins when I would swim or wade in the creeks on our property, however.

Annie, did any of your chocolate Habanero seedlings survive? This should be a good time for them to thrive and possibly bloom. I did not sprout any new seeds this year, but I have several plants that have been growing since last year that are putting out new chilies, but not that many. Fortunately, I had a large crop last year, and I made a very large batch of sauce and still had plenty left over to dry. If I am desperate, I can always use the dried chilies, but so far that has not been necessary.

It's difficult for me to garden this year, spending half my time in Cathedral City. This week-end, Kevin put in a drip irrigation system for our citrus trees, so that it will be easier for us to be gone for an extended period of time without having to rely on our next door neighbor, who is about six months pregnant now. We've left a key to our gate with her, and so her husband could help if she were unable, but I don't want to ask her again at this point.

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annie1992

Lars, all three of the habanero plants grew and are in the garden. There are small peppers on them, nothing ripe yet, of course, but I'm hopeful.

Annie


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Lars

If you got small peppers, that is something! I picked some small ripe ones this afternoon to add to a rice dish that I made for dinner (which also had red bell pepper, celery, onion, Hatch chili turkey sausage, etc), and they gave it a very nice flavor. The distinctive earthy flavor comes through even in very small quantities. I added cheddar cheese to the rice when serving it. It was a one-dish meal - very appropriate for a hot summer day, I think.

We didn't do any gardening this afternoon because it was too hot, and we watched Down to Earth and ate heirloom popcorn instead.

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KatieC

I still don't have one ripe tomato. And no color showing... argh. I do have one Stupice that might ipen in a week or two. It started out to be such a good year...hoping for a late freeze. My cabbage looks like an illustration from Peter Cottontail....beautiful, no loopers (thanks to regular Bt). I do have some cukes starting to form, Cucumbers are one of my challenges.....they either do really well... or not.

I haven't seen many aphids, which is nice. Or butterflies and my orchard is full of sweet William and black eyed susans, which they like. We haven't even had mosquitoes as bad as we usually do.

Raspberries aren't liking the heat. Blueberries, on the other hand, are going ballistic. We made them trellises and they are thanking us. My day neutral strawberries are starting to come back, even though it's hot. We'll have berries until snow now. I put in three grape vines last year and two of them have grapes. And Dr Doom said they wouldn't grow here. Ha.

Annie, that's gorgeous Music. I bought some last fall (since I lost 500 bulbs to voles) and it did pretty well for its first year. I tried a new one called Majestic that did awesome.....huge.

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annie1992

KatieC, here the voles dig the garlic up, but don't eat them, so if I can find them on time, I poke them back into the ground but if I don't find them quickly, well, you know. Majestic? I've never heard of that, I'll have to find some and give it a try. I grow Music because that's what Michigan State University says does well here, and they were sure right.

My berries did pretty well too. Now the bears have found the raspberries, so those are gone, and the chipmunks ate every ripe strawberry in the patch of 100 plants. Next year I guess I'll have to net them. (sigh)

A first for me this year was kidney beans. I've grown other beans for shelling, so I thought I'd give those a shot. They are already ripe, ready for shelling, and they are prolific. I planted a 25 foot half row as an experiment. About half of those were ready to pick and shell:


I have at least that much more in the garden which will be ready in a couple of days, but it took me 3 hours to shell these, I have to wait for my thumbs to not be sore. I also grew a row of Kebarika, but they are not ready yet, it'll be another couple of weeks, I think. Just a few are ripe, but aren't they pretty?


I actually have some melons too, I'm cautiously optimistic that one or two might actually ripen before frost, as long as it doesn't come early.

Tomorrow I'm cleaning out the hoop houses so I can plant fall lettuces, golden beets, turnips, some mache and maybe some snow peas. I told Elery I need more hoop houses, LOL.

Annie




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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

I am still dealing with a "big" "problem". :-)

Huge tomatoes are coming nonstop. Sandwich making gets very tricky.

I don't even use any fertilizer.


dcarch

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Not a bad problem to have! Gorgeous tomatoes. And all the beans Annie!

Just found this pic from 2016. I can vouch for this seller. I picked the best for Northern climates. I've been letting some scapes got to umbels every year saving bulbils,...planted in another smaller bed being so small. Back-up plan just in case. May need a third bed this fall. Hope to avoid the cost of purchasing ever again.



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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

...and this little monster. I've been harvesting early mornings. But this is a green one. They usually go for blushing or ripe.


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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Wow. Just checked HoodRiver site for garlic. They are out of everything. Seems covid has created some gardeners, chicken farmers, and bidding wars on country homes. (we have had two Realtor calls asking if we want to sell) 🙄

Dcarch, I should have lots of bulbils in a few weeks I could send. And some 2nd year I just harvested. You could probably get a nice 3x3 bed started. Bulbils only need about an inch or two apart. I most likely will have way more than I have room for even sharing with neighbors. I had a few hundred bulbils that went in the compost last year.

I have a nice collection of micros this year. This one is a surprise. Calling it Shmoo. After the RedWingPottery salt and pepper shakers designed by EvaZeisel years ago. They have been growing in clusters of two. Carrot leaf.

I've never grown SilverFirTree or any frilly carrot leaf. This cross was sent to me by a friend breeder from Utah. Both parents are micro, one carrot leaf.



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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

Sleeven, last week I got hold of a large supply of bulbs, enough for my 12' x 4' garlic plot. Thank you very much for your generous offer just the same. I really appreciate it.

The ones I got are hard neck very large cloves. I need the cloves to be extra large because I make my own black garlic.


dcarch

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Oh good. Glad you found what you need dcarch.

First year my carrots seem thin. Have never had a problem and we have had about the most perfect amount of rain. Maybe I'm jumping the gun...still lots of time before harvesting. Tomatillos are another crop that surprises me. Just a heap of hollow husks, then 'boom', they fill out in no time.

My Fall crop starts are doing better than expected. The original tray is suffering so I should pot some more up. What a tangled mess. I see a ton of basil and have no memory seeding it. I don't bother making seed maps of misc greens. I know what it is when it takes off in the garden. I'm just expecting hand-sized greens but might get a bigger crop. Just need to find room. Not yet ready to pull anything.

Cooler mornings this week so double my usual outside energy.



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KatieC

Sleevendog, a garlic farm opened this year to the north of me, almost to the Canadian border. It has a much cooler climate than Hood River. Last I looked she still had some varieties.Snow Valley Garlic. They're also on facebook.


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party_music50

Annie, your beans look fantastic! I don't have enough space to grow beans for shelling, but wish I did!

dcarch, didn't anyone ever tell you that it's not the size that counts? :O)

sleeve, that's wild about getting the calls re selling! When I bought my current house it was a foreclosure so needed lots of big repairs... after about a year, when the majority of work was done, I got a bunch of letters, notes, and phonecalls from people who wanted to rent it! lol!

re garlic, I used to work with a guy whose family started an organic garlic farm in northern NY. I can't recall the farm name at the moment, but he always laughed about growing organic garlic because there's nothing that requires less care or chemicals. I'm still growing the hardneck garlic that my uncle gave me when I had my first house! It's always been my favorite of the dozen or so varieties I've grown... 'French Rocambole'.

This is mostly what I've been picking every day... lots of tomatoes and apples. This is only part of today's harvest because I had already given some tomatoes to the neighbor and made some applesauce before I took the photo. I only have one plant of each tomato variety, but it's been a very good year for mine -- I swear that I've eaten at least a quart of fresh Sungolds every day. I love those things. lol! Every day I've made applesauce or a batch of marinara sauce for the freezer, and luckily I grew serranos this year, so my BF has made lots of salsa. He uses the recipe that cookebook found -- that recipe is SO GOOD!!! I didn't grow plum tomatoes, so he just uses whatever I give him and he cooks it enough to get the excess moisture out. I can't get to the recipe site now, so here's a link to the original thread: Guadalajara's Salsa

So here's part of my haul yesterday, but really, I just wanted to show some of my baskets. lol! The one on the lower-left is something I just made for my sister. :)

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

"party_music50

------------- dcarch, didn't anyone ever tell you that it's not the size that counts? :O) "

That's why I don't feel bad that I have small hands. :-)

dcarch

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nanelle_gw (usda 9/Sunset 14)

Looking amazing everyone! My tomatoes are struggling.


Dwarf Sweet Sue and Perfect Harmony Tomatoes, Corno di Toro "Giallo" and manzano peppers, Tiger Baby and Yellow Baby watermelons, Scotch Bonnet peppers, and my share of the Black Jack figs from my tree.

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party_music50

Nanelle, that all looks yummy! I'm the opposite and my tomatoes are great this year! I grew 10 varieties and have been making lots of salsa, sauce, eating a ton fresh, etc. etc.


My wild grapes grew great this year and the cardinals were starting to steal them so I decided to pick them last night. I left plenty for the birds. They cleaned up to just under 3 1/2 lbs of grapes, and I just finished making the jelly -- 4 1/2 jars. Totally yummy! :)


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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

@party_music50, I am so jealous. I absolutely adore wild grape jelly.

Our Estler's Mortgage Lifters are finally starting to get ripe. I swear it was almost as agonizing waiting on these as it was being a kid before Christmas!

We also have some Dixie Golden Giant and KBX ripening. I'll be putting some up in the freezer this week. Yay!

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nanelle_gw (usda 9/Sunset 14)


@party_music50, glad its going well. I had a good run until quite recently. Here is the orange fleshed melon.



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annie1992

Pretty orange melon, nanelle, and so is the yellow one.

Edie, Mortgage Lifters are my favorite tomato, and I like that they are a little later than most of the others, it gives me something to look forward too instead of just being tired of tomatoes!

Here I dug some of the Red Pontiac potatoes and made scalloped potatoes for Mother. They are are huge this year

Elery cut the cabbage for sauerkraut, the heads were about 8 pounds each, not exceptionally big for Late Dutch Flat, but big enough:


I still have a couple of bushels of tomatoes on the trailer and I'm still picking zucchini, although the cucumbers have finally given up. I shelled some more Kabarika beans and picked a handful of green beans that are still hanging on. The peppers are just starting to ripen, I got one big Ajvarski, lots of Sugar Rush Peach and enough pepperoncini to pickle one batch for my son in law who loves them.

The pullets are laying, we got 25 eggs today, but they are still "beginner" eggs, so they are about a size medium. Bigger than the "peewee" size we were getting at first, LOL, but not full sized yet. Lots of pretty colors, like sleevendog's baskets of eggs:

I still need to finish digging the potatoes and cut all the kale and collards. It rained hard last night and is supposed to rain again tomorrow, so many of the tomatoes will split and crack, we won't get a lot more of them. The butternut squash will be ready after that, and I still haven't gotten a single eggplant from any of the 8 plants I set out. And I need to check on the watermelon and the grapes, I have one seedless concord vine and I ought to just rip it out and forget about it. It gets grapes but I haven't figured out how to successfully prune it. It's a tangle of vines with a few grapes that the rodents find in among the leaves far before I do.

Fortunately the apple trees made up for the grapes, they are heavy with apples this year.

Annie

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

Oh Annie, I so miss my apple trees. Applesauce, all lovely kinds of jellies (my favorite was Candy Apple) and Linda Lou's Apple Pie Jam. And those beautiful eggs!! Now I'm jealous all over again. <Grin>

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party_music50

Annie, I feel better about my potted eggplant then... I've got one eggplant on each plant -- but they're still hard as rocks. :)

Edie, I'm curious about your Candy Apple jelly. I have two apple trees -- one early and one late. My early apples are done now, but I'll have more coming soon.

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

@party_music50, basically it is a regular apple jelly recipe with cinnamon red-hots (Imperials) added. Here is the recipe I use: https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/candy-apple-jelly/

It truly is a beautiful dark pink and much more flavor than just plain apple jelly.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Annie. quick question. Did you start any fall crops? I think you may have mentioned that. Mine just have not taken hold. Meaning I expected them to take off by now. Still alive but only about 3-4 inches.

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annie1992

Mine are in the two hoophouses Elery built for me. I have several kinds of lettuce, golden beets, some new to me purple baby bok choi, a 45 day turnip, some snow peas and green onions. I'm hoping I can grow leaves for salad until maybe Thanksgiving!

I only planted those things a couple of weeks ago, so they are tiny but seem to be flourishing, I just have to close up the hoop houses at night so the deer don't make a visit to the "salad bar".

I still have butternut squash, lots of unripe peppers and eggplant and a ton of green tomatoes in the garden. I live trapped a big fat groundhog in the butternut squash yesterday so maybe they'll have a chance to finish ripening, although we have temperatures of 35F or lower forecasted for Friday night.

So, of course I have fall gardens, LOL, you know I just have to!

Annie

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

My new garlic patch. more than 160 gloves for next year. Very large clove variety. 160 heads should be plenty for next year.

Will find out if white rot is under control.


dcarch



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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

I went to get some parsley the other day and there was nothing but a few bare sticks. Hopefully that means we will have a bumper crop of swallowtail butterflies next spring! So time to start some for indoor winter growing. I have some basil cuttings rooted already.

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beesneeds

I love your spacing plastic dcarch, where did you get it?

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Fingers crossed for your garlic crop. My peas look good, and basil. Weather looks good. The 10 day anyway. All my fall greens disappeared in a heap of lace eaten destruction of doom. Should have used my row covers.

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

Thanks Sleeven. Using sous vide cooker to sanitize the cloves at exactly 113F gives me some assurance that things may be OK.

"beesneeds

I love your spacing plastic dcarch, where did you get it?"

Here is the system I developed. A one-time quick work saves lot's of labor:

  1. Inexpensive weed control landscape fabric, which allows watering but blocks weeds.

2. "A" is a 1 1/2" metal tube. The tube is heated up using a blow torch. It can cut holes thru the fabric easily and quickly.

3. "B" is another 1 1/2" tube used to core and remove soil thru the holes, leaving a precise hole in the soil at a depth good for garlic.

4. "C" is a plunger to push the soil inside tube "B" to cover the garlic clove.

5. "D" is a ruler to make sure proper social distancing between gloves are maintained. :-)

Everything is reusable. Same system is used for growing a few other seedlings.


dcarch

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jerzeegirl (FL zone 9B)

My basil went nuts this year. One plant and it's about 4' x 4' x 4'. I told my neighbors to come and get some because there's enough to go around.

The eggplant. The poor eggplant. I planted it in July and it was promising. It's a beautiful plant full of flowers and every flower thusfar has fallen off the plant. Except for one which actually produced a tiny little ball of a purple eggplant and then it fell off the plant. It's in an ideal location, got plenty of rain (during the monsoon season). The plant itself is thriving; but no eggplant.....yet. I am holding out hope.

Oh, and for some inexplicable reason my tarragon bit the dust. Too much rain followed by drought, perhaps? I think I will get a new plant. Weather here is unpredictable....it's either feast or famine.

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annie1992

Jerzeegirl, it must be the weather, my basil also went crazy, and my tarragon did too, but I did not get one single ripe eggplant from my 6 plants. We're a long way apart, but I guess eggplant just wasn't happy anywhere this year.

Annie

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party_music50

So weird — I’m a long way too and my basil was fantastic this year and I got one eggplant, plus a little one still hanging on. Lol. It was a really good year for tomatoes for me.


We finally have a little rain this morning — it’s been weeks since it rained and it sounds so nice.

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party_music50

A couple years back, there was talk here about how good Honeynut squash is. Did anyone who saved the seeds from one of these squash ever grow it to see if it came true?

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cindy_z6b/7a VA

Party_Music - I've saved seeds for this squash for a number of years and it has been consistent every year. You do mean the variety Honeynut Mini-Butternut Sqaush?

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party_music50

Thanks, Cindy. Well, now I'm not sure. I ordered a "Honeynut" squash in my Misfits shipment for later this week. iirc, it showed a photo that looks like a green/striped version of a butternut squash, but there's no indication of size. At the time I did a quick on-line search and saw photos that looked like it, so I assumed there was only ONE 'Honeynut' squash. lol!

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cindy_z6b/7a VA

party m. - When they are fully ripe the green turns an orange-y tan color.


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party_music50

Cute! If it is the same variety, why would Misfits show an unripe squash? lol! I guess I'll leave it in the order and see what I get.

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dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m

I have had major problems this year and years before. Here are what I am doing to deal with the problems.

1. Fig trees - here in zone 6 area, I never had luck with my fig trees. Finally I developed a new winterizing method (posted on another thread) and I am getting figs finally. I will apply this method for all my fig trees.


2. Garlic white rot - I am using the heated method, sous vide cloves to 113F, to kill off the white rot virus. (posted here above) Will find out if I succeed the coming season.

3. This season, all squashes soon died off from borers. I understand that borer moths fly at night. So I got UV light zappers to try to kill off the moths. Will see if this will improve my squashes for next season.

4. Big time squirrel problem. I don't understand why. Global warming? I am not happy with traps I bought. So I made my own.


dcarch

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annie1992

I've also had some major problems with pests this year, mostly the big fat groundhog that evaded me for much of the summer but finally got careless a few weeks ago. The deer ate the golden beets, the groundhog built a burrow right in the row of kale, the tomatoes overran my red onions, I never did get a ripe eggplant for reasons unknown. I canned kale today and had to wash them repeatedly to get rid of aphids. Gophers ate every single ripe strawberry the minute it started to turn color and the bear wiped out the raspberries. I got about half a dozen peaches, the rest succumbed to the early frost.

Still, I got plenty, enough to share with the local food bank and several neighbors, more than I wanted to can, and for that I'm grateful.

Collards are something that really grew, the leaves are so big I had to measure one!

29 inches long and 12 inches wide, that's without the big stem.

You know, it's always amazing how 2 bushels of kale only makes 7 quarts of canned greens...

I need to go take pictures of my "winter garden" and get another thread started!

Annie

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