Aunt Jemima is toast ... what next?

bragu_DSM 5

Am I going those my beloved black vinegar?

SaveComment32Like
Comments (32)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindac92

Uncle Ben for sure....maybe even the Keebler elves....who knows.
At least we got rid of that restaurant chain, Sambo's....even the WASP that i am cringed at that one.

2 Likes Save     Thanked by bragu_DSM 5
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sooz

Where does it stop? We have a national history, the good, the bad, the ugly and the questionable. To try and change that history by erasing certain things "of that time" --acceptable or not under the lens of being woke, is going to an extreme, although some things really do need to go, as Linda mentioned.

Eskimo Pies may be next, and white bread, white rice, brown rice, black rice, brown bread, Apple Brown Betty, red-skinned grapes, and don't forget -- not a food-- Mt. Rushmore--and that's just to name a few!

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
laceyvail 6A, WV

Get a grip, sooz. Nobody objects to colors. It's the cultural/racial insults that people rightly want to end. Southern white people used to call older black people uncle and aunt rather than calling them Mr, Miss or Mrs.

7 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arkansas girl

This is probably a hot topic! So what are they going to do with the things that have been named after a black person? Is that a bad thing, why can't a product be named after someone of color? Will they just rename the syrup something like Yummy Good Syrup? Will the company go out of business?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
foodonastump

Yes it’s a hot topic and it’s been discussed on the appropriate forum. I’d suggest people take their disingenuous comments there.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cloudy_christine

Calling people disingenuous also belongs on Hot Topics.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

I hardly think a commercial product brand name counts as any kind of heritage or national history.

And the comments were called that, not the person.

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sooz

Laceyvail, in my little corner of the world, there's talk about changing names that are based on color in addition to eradicating symbols & people, including Civil War generals, etc etc, so yeah, people are objecting to color and such. I guess you didn't realize that different areas of the country might have different takes on things. This topic is already getting too hot for me, so I'm signing off this thread.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bragu_DSM 5

This was not posted on the HT forum on purpose, because people on this forum are MUCH MORE CIVIL with each than over there. If I could delete the thread, I would. I don't appreciate the angst.

lindac recognized the spirit of the post ...

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
petalique

Didn’t there used to be a wider shot/depiction of Aunt Jemima on the label?

Our family, in New England, used different brands — nothing “sensitive” but for the flavor and price (large family, very modest income) and culture (cold New England where REAL HONEST TO GOODNESS SUGAR MAPLES GROW), and both parents and children were very good Yankee imaginative cooks.

Back in the 1960s in many rural areas, the “grocery” stores had modest offerings — no fresh button mushroom, but canned were available. Wonder Bread years. The fragrance of a typical rural grocery store in rural working class New England within 30-40 miles of the coast was a dazzling admixture of freshly ground coffee beans, grapefruit, fresh baked bread, cookies and fish. Real maple syrup was affordable. My family usually bought “Log Cabin” brand which had a large component of genuine maple syrup in the mix. No one in my family could stomach the too sweet, bland, muffled cobweb taste of corn syrup, Karo, or whatever and it’s cotton mouth feel. (Back then, we didn’t know that this texture would later become known in culinary nomenclature as “mouth feel.” Maybe there was an occasional Aunt Jemima syrup or pancake mix in our pantry.

On a strictly personal level, I don’t mind, BUT for the fact that, once again, it has come into the public awareness, that certain trademark symbols and terms are hurtful to some American citizens. I respect that.

So, yes, the images of the smiling faces Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben (enslaved - or children of slaves— but super happy to help with kitchen work) needs to be retired. Just like DDT and Talcum Baby Powder. No Good, after all. Harmful.

The homey sentiments and cultural preferences of the entitled oppressive class don’t get to vote on keeping the outdated and hurtful imagery. Sorry. Try to be considerate and flexible.

Our Chinese ‘black’ vinegar and sesame and poppyseeds are safe from re-labeling; but y’all knew that already, didn’t you. False equivalency. Caucasians/whites have enjoyed the lion’s share of the world’s resources and privileges. Let’s embrace decency and fair play. I think we’re up to the challenge. This is the time for heartfelt awareness, not petty behavior rooted in fear of sharing. It is not a lot to ask, is it?

6 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

The homey sentiments and cultural preferences of the entitled oppressive class don’t get to vote on keeping the outdated and hurtful imagery. Sorry. Try to be considerate and flexible.

Thank you.

And I agree with FOAS 100%.

Racist and sexist branding has got to stop. Decades too late. Open the dialog and learn. No one is suggesting anyone is racist.

If you don't understand the recent issues or why...there lies the problem. No mater where on the globe you live.

This is not the place to teach/learn how horrid this problem is.



3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
foodonastump

Didn’t there used to be a wider shot/depiction of Aunt Jemima on the label?

There was, and a few years back she became pretty much a regular, nice looking black woman. I’m pretty ambivalent about retiring the brand name; I thought they addressed it well in the past but if they feel this is time for a more drastic change, that’s up to them.


There are many conversations going on about different things these days, and we’re all going to have varying opinions about what’s legit and what goes too far. No one is suggesting erasing colors from our vocabulary, so I thought some of the flippant comments about a serious issue were inappropriate for this forum. My response wasn’t directed at any one person, and I “know” every one of you enough to know you’re better than that.


Sorry for the disruption; I’ll post no further.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

It's an outdated and hurtful stereotype and our culture is evolving - hopefully.

And I don't think black vinegar will be changed - unless there's some sort of culturally offensive labeling for it...?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Lars

I only remember Aunt Jemima pancake mix, which my mother used to buy when I was very small. At that time we had a maid who looked like Aunt Jemima, and I loved her very much. I was very upset when she quit, but I think she had good reasons. Her son and I were the same age and best friends until they moved away. They lived up the road from us in a house that my father provided for them, along with a vegetable garden.

Sambo is South Indian instead of African, but the book is still racist (as the main character is called black), and so I can understand why the restaurant had to change its name. I read that book many times as a child. I also knew a white man named Sam who called himself Sambo. I never went to Sambo's, but I don't think it was an Indian restaurant.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

When I said something to my granddaughters about the terrible thing being done to our history by tearing down statues, etc., one of my granddaughter said something to me that truly made me rethink my thoughts. Basically, this is approximately what she said: "Our history will reamin in the history books to learn from. A monument's purpose is to honor something, right? I don’t want to honor something fueled by hate." I told her I had never thought of it in that way. To be honest, her comment has truly changed my thoughts on that particular subject. While I still don't condone the tearing down of such items by mobs, I certainly have a better understanding of the reasons that cities/states are doing so.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Lars

A bit off topic, but I've been wanting Andrew Jackson off the 20 dollar bill for decades because of his cruel treatment of Native Americans and the effective genocide of so many of them. And his statues belong in museums instead of in public parks.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cloudy_christine

Lars, I agree about Andrew Jackson.

Should some public monuments come down? Yes, in my opinion.

Should mobs be allowed to destroy them? ? Absolutely not.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
chas045

Should some public monuments come down? Yes, in my opinion.

Should mobs be allowed to destroy them? ? Absolutely not.

Sorry about still being off topic: Almost every Southern Statue represents a traitor to the USA and to human and Christian (and other religious) values. That's why they should come down. Unfortunately, many of the southern states have passed laws (some recently) preventing local governments from removing them. That doesn't really leave any manner other than 'mobs' to remove them.

4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cloudy_christine

Really? Not any other way? Like working to change the laws?

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

As if people hadn't been doing that already?

As MLK jr. said: a riot is the language of the unheard.

1 Like Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

I my area of the US, cities are working at ridding statues that are of people not to be honored. My sister and I were talking last night and discussing this very thing my granddaughter said. At first she didn't see it. Then I stated that I sure would not want to see a statue of Adolf Hitler; she vociferously agreed. Then we started discussing how groups of peoples could feel the same way when they saw statues that reminded them of reprehensible things.


And riots are absolutely not the way to rid our nation of these terrible honorary statues or pictures on money. Wonder if rioters would tear up/burn those bills with the pictures of Andrew Jackson!

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
desertsteph

why can't a product be named after someone of color?

good question... I like Uncle Ben's rice. His gson is against removing his name / picture from the product. why shouldn't it remain on the products? people have gone nuts with this stuff.

the majority (if not all) of those out there protesting and destroying statues don't know the history of them - they're destroying those of men who worked to free the slaves. Most don't know that and they aren't doing it to 'free blacks'. they're doing it to destroy the history of this country. What then? Slavery didn't exist? Most of those younger people (those doing this) don't know the history behind the statues or the men. they're just believing what they're told by their Marxist leaders (BLM), and doing what they're told to do.

It's about Marxism and taking over the US. the same as was done in Cuba, Venezuela and other countries.


1 Like Save     Thanked by bragu_DSM 5
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
petalique

^^^^hi steph, I hope you’ll consider listening or reading more responsible media. From where did you harvest such wildly off the mark, rhetoric?

2 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Cloud Swift

Steph, Because it isn't named after a person of color. It was a name gotten from a character in a minstrel show - a mammy charicature - not a real person. At first they used a cartoonish drawing but later hired a series of women to portray the character. See: https://www.ferris.edu/jimcrow/mammies/

I agree with petalique and foas's comments above.

3 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
agmss15

The monuments of the confederate heros were put up for the most part generations after the civil war during the KKK’s reign of terror to disenfranchise Americans of color. They were put up specifically to rewrite the history of the Confederacy and to intimidate black communities. To stop people from exercising their full rights as citizens. They worked. They deserve to be challenged.

I am from a maple syrup producing area. I have no sentimental feelings about Aunt Jemima - I found the mammy image uncomfortable but didn’t think much about it. I do find it odd that the loss of a brand name upsets people in the face of actual dead people. We are being asked to think about things we haven’t considered before - we need to listen.

I come from a family of artists including several public monuments - destruction of art makes me very queasy. Chaotic crowds make me nervous. That said pretty much all the rights I enjoy as an American were not bestowed kindly rather they were demanded by rabble rousing troublemakers. It seems unfair to demand others wait patiently until their humanity is finally recognized.

I hope we can as a country get to a post pandemic more just country. Be safe all.


4 Likes Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
desertsteph

This is probably a hot topic! So what are they going to do with the things that have been named after a black person? Is that a bad thing, why can't a product be named after someone of color?

that's my question too. what's the problem with it? If someone doesn't like the picture on the pkg - don't buy the product!

are they gonna take Mr Quaker away too?

Is the black and white panda offensive now also?


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cloudy_christine

The rights you enjoy as an American were written into a constitution so they would have the force of law. Great men like Frederick Douglass and Martin Luther King believed in that constitution. MLK led a great non-violent movement to secure those rights for all. Rabble rousers? No.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

The framers of our Constitution were arguably rabble rousers, since they were unarguably revolutionaries, revolting against the monarchy of England.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cloudy_christine

We disagree on the definition. They were indeed revolutionaries. When they said "we pledge our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor" they meant that literally. They could have been executed as traitors.

Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
desertsteph

petalique

^^^^hi steph, I hope you’ll consider listening or reading more responsible media.

I do. When will those on the left start doing that?

From where did you harvest such wildly off the mark, rhetoric?

reality... history (not what is taught and promoted by the left)


Save    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

Please stop trying to turn this discussion into a partisan political fight. There is a forum specifically for that.
https://www.gardenweb.com/discussions/hottopics

2 Likes Save     Thanked by bragu_DSM 5
Browse Gardening and Landscaping Stories on Houzz See all Stories
Kitchen Design Houzz Call: Tell Us About Your First Kitchen
Great or godforsaken? Ragtag or refined? We want to hear about your younger self’s cooking space
Full Story
Kitchen Design A Cook’s 6 Tips for Buying Kitchen Appliances
An avid home chef answers tricky questions about choosing the right oven, stovetop, vent hood and more
Full Story
Kitchen Appliances Considering a New Kitchen Gadget? Read This First
Save money, time and space by learning to separate the helpers from the hassles
Full Story