boo hoo, I soaked my cast iron skillet

bbstx

I have a small Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron skillet. Last night I fried some sausages in it. When I tried to clean it, little bits still stuck to the skillet. I decided to put a little water in it and let it soak for "just a minute." I got distracted and did not get back to the skillet until this morning.

I have thoroughly washed it with a blue scrubby sponge and a bit of dish soap. Then dried it with paper towels. Not much color on the paper towels UNTIL I coated it with oil. Then something from the skillet came off on the paper towels. The were kind of charcoal grey-ish. It is now in a 250 degree oven.

Did I do right? Is there something else I need to do (other than buy a timer to remind me to get back to things...but that is a whole different subject!)?

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arkansas girl

I actually soak mine all the time but after I dry them I put them on a burner to dry completely and put some oil in it and then use a paper towel to dry up excess oil. I've had my skillet for 30 years. I love it. Maybe the experts would disagree with me but I've found no ill effects from soaking it as long as I dry it on the burner and then put oil in it right away.

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shaun

I finally got my mom's cast iron skillets from my sister. The bottoms of them are shiny to the point they look wet but they're not! Is this a sign of a well seasoned skillet?

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bbstx

AR girl, my mother has always soaked her cast iron skillets. And washed them with soap and water, and even on occasion, scrubbed them with SOS. And they always seem to stay "seasoned." But hers are older than dirt and she has done years of frying in them... she fries everything (for those of you who have visions of overweight southerners, my mother is VERY slender)! Mine is fairly new. I'm hopeful that rubbing with oil and putting it in the oven for a while will be all I need to do.

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lindac

If your skillet is fairly new, you will need to grease and heat repeatedly.
Linda C

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bbstx

I just took my skillet out of the oven where it had been heating with oil on it for about two hours. When I wipe down the "floor" of the inside, the paper towel comes away with dark stuff on it, but that doesn't happen when I wipe the sides of the inside or the outside. Is it just dirty? What should I do next?

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arley_gw

All is not lost. Seasoning is an ongoing process, and whatever (minimal) seasoning the Lodge folks applied to your skillet will soon be supplanted by your own efforts.

FWIW, here's how I clean cast iron that needs some scouring: use coarse salt and paper towels, with just a little bit of water if needed, to loosen up the stuck on stuff. Then rinse the pan with hot water, dry it with another paper towel, put it back on the stove a few minutes to drive off any remaining water, and then while it's still warm apply a thin coat of oil.

The cast iron guru in this forum is Dan ('danab'); I've learned a lot of info from his posts. Some of his previous threads are linked to in this recent thread about cast iron and soap.

Here is a link that might be useful: cast iron and soap

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hawk307

bbstx: You did alright. You get a Gold Star.

You also have good advice.

I do the same as Arkansas.I season mine on the Range top,
after coating it with oil.

Better in the oven at about 300 Degrees. For about 2 hours.
Lou

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annie1992

bbstyx, it's fine. I don't soak my skillets, usually, but I'll put some water in them, bring it to a boil and then wipe it out after scraping off the bits with a wooden spoon.

After I rub it with shortening and put it in the oven at 350 for about 2 hours, or I use it to make french fries and it's good as new.

Yes, Shaun, the shiny interior probably means it is very well seasoned. Black and shiny, and doesn't rub off? That's seasoning.

Annie

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