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Annie Laurie McDowell

roseseek
2 months ago
last modified: 2 months ago

I have just received word from Steve Singer at Wisconsin Roses he has three ALmD maidens budded to multiflora, left from last year available. The price is $20 each plus shipping. He reports he can probably ship at the end of October. If you're interested, please contact him at wiroses@gmail.com to reserve your plant. Remember, there are only THREE available so he who hesitates misses out!


All three plants are now sold!

Comments (52)

  • roseseek
    Original Author
    2 months ago

    Good for you, Ben! You're welcome!

  • Mischievous Magpie (CO 5b)
    2 months ago

    @BenT (9B Sunset 14) Oh gosh I can't wait to see how you grow it, you're such a talented gardener. I was eyeballing it but I don't think it's got a snowball's chance of surviving in this zone, and I'm no zone pusher.

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    Annie Laurie McDowell

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    I raised the seedling in the Newhall garden. In those years (early nineties), that area experienced a one hundred degree temperature swing from summer to winter (115 - 15 F) many years. The "milder" years only swung about 80 degrees, with the extremes not quite as dramatic as the more volatile ones. Anything potted remained in the pot ghetto where MANY cans of soil shaded the can sides. I had to create shade there with plants, stacked blocks to create raised beds, and groups of potted plants. As with any "infant plant", it requires creating a "nursery" area where you can more easily regulate and control the conditions. I had that in Encino, where "winters" were not sufficient to stimulate black berries to flower and the hibiscus flowered all winter long. Summer for the past several spiked to the triple digits a few times and was frequently in the mid to high nineties. Fortunately, I could use existing plants and the shade of the house to provide more protection than I could provide in the rear (western and southern exposure) where the adult plants struggled. I would only plant things in gallons during "winter" when I knew the conditions wouldn't fry them quickly. Once it began climbing into the eighties and higher and remaining there, two, three and five gallon cans were the rule for most plants. It takes a lot longer to completely overheat two and more gallons of damp soil than it does a gallon. Even here, where it has seldom exceeded the low eighties, I have to shield smaller pots from the intensity of the blistering sun. The air and wind are cool, but that sun is brutal and it fries things VERY quickly.
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    Congrats, Sheila! I share your excitement and agree that Burling is terrific. Just remember, Annie Laurie McDowell takes a looooong time to climb. If you enjoy her graceful leaves and pretty blooms every step of the way, you will have patience. I disbud her to encourage her to grow, but her buds tend to get away from me when my back is turned. I don't mind letting her bloom every once in awhile. Bonnie
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    Annie Laurie McDowell is beautiful!

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    Yes, I realize I am going to need both patience and perseverance with these babies, but I'm ok with that! All good things take time, energy and lots of loving attention. I am one of those gardeners who enjoy the process nearly as much as the results and often choose starting from seeds or cuttings even when other options are available. Thanks again, all of you for your helpful suggestions. (I don't know why profile still doesn't show my location and zone. I updated it last night.)
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    So excited! Annie Laurie McDowell is here!

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    She is here too! I also got her last night, gave her a good soak, and potted her up this morning. (Well, mostly I potted up multiflora that will soon be mostly Annie Laurie McDowell, but you all know what I mean!) I'm so excited to see how the bud eye grows at the point when I clip off the multiflora branches! Thank you Kim for making this possible! And thanks to Steve at Wisconsin Roses for doing such a great job with this rose!
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  • dianela7bnorthal
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    I contacted him just now. I hope it isnt bad form for me to try and get one since I already have a beautiful tiny own root one. This is a very blackspot resistant variety and grafted may be a very nice thing to have. I am willing to back off if anyone from here needs it of course. I am working on creating a spray free collection for here in the south and this rose is a very excellent rose. Thank you Kim.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    2 months ago

    Well, I held off as long as I could and I think I got the third one. I too did not want to be a horrible greedy person but what could I do? I am what I am.

    Thank you so much, Kim. It will be great to have a grafted plant too. My two ownroot plants from Burling are treasures.

  • dianela7bnorthal
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Lol yea Sheila he just told me it was sold out. It is alright, I am so glad a few more plants of this rose will be out there. She is very special. Maybe next time 😊

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    2 months ago

    Dianela, I thought you already had yours, after Ben, and I was third after you. Please don't hate me.

  • strawchicago z5
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    dianela7bnorthal You are right about your own root Annie being healthy. My Annie survives three zone 5a winters OUTSIDE as own root & never see blackspots on it. It got eaten this July down to 2 inch. by a rabbit, so I put it in a pot, and saw its roots being VERY LONG & THICK and woody (similar to Dr.Huey rootstock). I regret putting its roots in a 7-gallon tall air-pot, a bit too crowded. I should had put its root in a 12-gallon air-pot.

    Now it's up to 1 foot & lots of blooms, it recuperated well since roots is big as 4th-year-own root. My 1st Annie died back in 2014 since I didn't dig deep for drainage. Annie can do well as own-root in zone 5a if dug deep for drainage.

    I failed to root Annie since rabbits kept eating it so short, but I'll keep it in a pot from now so I can get longer cuttings of it. I need a back up in case my zone 5a winter kill the mother plant. As own-root Annie does better in a pot than in my clay.

    There are 2 roses that look fantastic in a pot: Annie and Augusta Luis, both as own-roots.

    Annie has the most wonderful scent in the vase. One cluster can perfume the entire room with its lilac and musk scent. One time I was eating a ripe banana 20 feet from Annie, and all I could smell was Annie. Annie's scent was stronger than a ripe banana. Even Golden Celebration (below Annie's cluster) cannot match the intensity of Annie's scent (lilac and musk):




  • dianela7bnorthal
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Sheila I had emailed him but he hadn’t confirmed that I had gotten one. Some other lucky lady or gentlemen got the 2nd one. I could never hate you 🥰. How wonderful it is to see everyone loving and appreciating all these little garden jewels.

    OT: This reminds me of another little rose I don’t hear much about. Kendyl Marie. She is a wonderful poly that is 100 percent healthy and blooms nonstop here. I think only Heirloom sells it that I am aware of and totally worth it. She can get to around 3ish feet tall if not pruned.

    Looks lile a tiny pomponella




  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    2 months ago

    Thank you so much for your kindness, Dianela. I guess the other was sold to a mystery buyer. I just assumed no one but us on the forum knew about the opportunity.

    I agree these treasures have to be spread around. Nurseries seem to be in a precarious position these days.

    That Kendyl Marie is adorable too.

  • jacqueline9CA
    2 months ago

    Kendyl Marie is adorable. I am so glad that hybridizers are making NEW polyanthas - a type of rose which can grow in almost any climate and be happy, and fit in any garden.


    Jackie

  • Aaron Rosarian Zone 5b
    2 months ago

    Be sure to check out the small multiples section on their website. It looks like there are Stephen Rulos available.

  • strawchicago z5
    2 months ago
    last modified: 2 months ago

    Annie is tough as 4th-year own root in my zone 5a. It didn't sprout a tiny shoot until late June (I thought my winter killed it), then it got eaten by rabbits down to 2" end of July. So I moved it to an air pot and it gave 5 blooms to sniff.

    Below 7-gallon pot is too small for its long & chunky root (like Dr.Huey rootstock). I need to move it to a 12-gallon pot later.

    See own-root Annie pumping out more buds, pic. taken 9/15/22, it's 100% healthy despite 3 days of constant rain. Pic. taken at 90% humidity.





  • BenT (9B Sunset 14)
    last month

    @Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR did you receive your Annie Laurie McDowell? I have not yet.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    last month

    I have not yet, Ben. I thought Steve said early November shipping. Depending on the size of plant we receive, I might pot mine. I'm thinking about it.

  • BenT (9B Sunset 14)
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Thanks Sheila, I must have missed the part about early Nov shipping, and started getting worred that orphan Annie was adrift in our postal system. I’ll defintiely pot mine, I like to be able to control the water, nutrient and light exposure on little plants until they get stronger.

  • susan9santabarbara
    29 days ago

    I ordered 2 roses from Steve in September, and he said he'd email me my invoice in October. I haven't heard from him yet. Last year, he sent my custom budded roses and 2 others I purchased in mid-to-late November. So maybe he's working on the colder zone folks first?

  • roseseek
    Original Author
    29 days ago

    His latest Instagram post was two weeks ago showing newly dug maidens being prepared for storage and/or shipment, so, it appears he's working to get them all processed.


  • BenT (9B Sunset 14)
    29 days ago

    Thanks Kim, terrific pic!

  • roseseek
    Original Author
    29 days ago

    You're welcome, Ben. It's Steve's from his work that day. I love screen shots! LOL!

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    29 days ago

    Susan, Steve already sent my invoice a month ago and I sent him a check which he acknowledged.

    If you don't have an invoice yet, I would call him tomorrow.

  • susan9santabarbara
    29 days ago

    Sheila, last year, Steve sent me my invoice for payment a few days before he shipped all of my roses. So it could be that, being in So. Calif., I was at the end of his list for shipping. But I'll shoot him an email tomorrow just to confirm :-D

  • Rosefolly
    27 days ago

    Hi Susan, I haven't seen you post for a long time. Nice to see you are seill growing roses!


  • BenT (9B Sunset 14)
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Annie Laurie McDowell has arrived! @Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR I hope yours has arrived, or is coming soon, too!



    @roseseek @susan9santabarbara

    Kim and Susan, hoping you can answer some questions, this is my first maiden. I assume for this particular plant the budwood canes have been cut , and all green canes are ALM is that correct? The green canes are over 12” long (much longer than the roots) should I trim them short or just let them be? thank you!





  • Ken Wilkinson
    18 days ago

    I've been growing maidens from Steve for several years. The top of the multiflora root stock has already been cut, so yes, all the green canes are ALM. Just pot it up and water it. You will be happy with it.

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    18 days ago

    How wonderful, Ben! Steve is going to ship mine 11/14/22 because I am out of town ATM. Steve told me on the phone that these are regular grafted plants so all the green would be Annie and you just handle them like a regular grafted rose.

    Ben yours looks wonderful. I would not prune at all, but let the plant grow from here. Annie is going to do great for us grafted and should be a climber.

    Your new plant is much larger than the own root bands I received from Burling and mine are going great from her, but I know grafted from Steve will be stronger. I can't wait!

    Hi Elon too.


  • BenT (9B Sunset 14)
    18 days ago

    Thank you Sheila and Ken! Sheila, I’m also surprised by how big the plant is. For comparison, Elon is a big Chihuahua (I stopped weighing him at 12 lbs)

  • roseseek
    Original Author
    18 days ago

    @BenT (9B Sunset 14) Congratulations! That is NOT a "maiden". That IS a "bare root"! Look here at Steve's site about maidens. http://www.wiroses.com/maiden_explanation.html You can plant this thing as it is, though I WOULD mound it until new growth begins which indicates it is generating new feeder roots and will be able to support itself. You're far from the safety of "winter" and reliable "rains" to keep it hydrated until it's fully settled in. What I have traditionally done with bare roots is to plant them in five gallon nursery cans. Plant it at the depth you normally would plant it but don't fill the pot yet.


    Create a cylinder from corrugated cardboard which will slide inside the mouth of the pot several inches and stand to nearly the height of the plant's canes. You want the ends of the cylinder to overlap so once it is filled with wet soil, the pot will keep it from opening. Unless you want to reduce the canes' lengths, it isn't necessary, but can be done. Slip the cylinder into the pot and position it so only the top inch or two of the canes protrude above its sides. Continue filling the cylinder with the potting soil you've used to plant the bare root and water it in to settle the soil. Keep filling until only the top very few inches of the canes remain uncovered by the soil. Keep the pot watered as you would normally for a newly potted bare root. As new growth begins, you can begin gradually removing soil from the cylinder to slowly harden the plant off to the hotter, brighter, drier conditions.


    The entire idea is to keep the plant cool, dark and damp to encourage it to develop roots. Exposing the canes to warm sunlight encourages them to break into growth before it begins growing roots. This is why people have trouble with planting bare roots which start leafing out and may even form flower buds, then collapse and die. They are using the stored nutrients in the plant it would normally depend upon to break from dormancy and into growth in the spring, instead of creating roots to support itself while growing. As more growth appears on the canes, more soil can be removed from the cylinder until you've uncovered them and the cylinder can be removed from the pot. At that point, you have a leafed out plant with a pot full of roots, hardened off to the prevailing conditions and actually ready to plant in the ground where you want to plant it. Using the cylinder method to mound them in pots, I have NEVER lost a bare root and have actually resurrected quite a few "dried out" plants I likely should have given up on.


    If you are ready to plant it in the ground, you can do the same mounding with either a large, free standing mound, or you can use the cylinder like in a pot but you'll need to either tie it closed or securely staple it to prevent the weight of the wet soil from pushing the sides open and allowing the soil to escape. Just keep watering the plant through the top of the cylinder as long as it's in place. I hope I've explained it appropriately. Please ask if I've not explained it well enough. Congratulations! I'm delighted there are now a few more budded ALmD plants "out there" I'm sure you're going to love her!



  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    18 days ago

    I am shocked at the size too, Ben. Thank you so much for the photo and I'll post one too when I get mine.

  • BenT (9B Sunset 14)
    18 days ago

    Kim,

    Thanks for the detailed insturctions, much appreciated. I have always mounded my bare root plants (usually with an inverted pot, bottom cut off), but I’ll follow all your advice.


    Sheila,

    Look forward to your plant!



    roseseek thanked BenT (9B Sunset 14)
  • susan9santabarbara
    18 days ago

    I received my two budded maidens from Steve today, and mine have the normal bud of the desired rose in the carved out spot near the base. I potted both of mine up with the bud slightly above the soil line. But if you think they're not normal budded maidens, you should contact Steve. The normal instructions are to wait until the top canes (which are multiflora, as are the roots) start to leaf out, then cut the whole thing off above the bud to allow the desired budded rose to develop. This has always been my process with roses from Steve.

  • susan9santabarbara
    18 days ago

    Here are Steve's specific instructions on how to deal with his budded maidens: http://www.wiroses.com/instructions.html

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Steve told me on the phone that all that does not apply to these ALMs. The tops are ALM.

    roseseek thanked Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
  • roseseek
    Original Author
    18 days ago

    Thanks, Sheila. You can see just from looking at them they AREN'T maidens but ARE ALmD bare roots. Ben's photos clearly show the stock has been removed and the canes all come directly from the inserted bud. He did a NICE job of them! And that growth in the months from budding until shipping? Not bad for a rose that "won't grow"!

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    18 days ago

    I totally agree, Kim, with what a wonderful job Steve has done and the boost ALM is getting from the grafted rootstock. I think this was all your idea and it was a great one for your treasure of a rose.

    My own root two are doing very well here too.

    roseseek thanked Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
  • roseseek
    Original Author
    18 days ago

    I'm glad they're doing well, Sheila. You're a good "rose mom"! I'm also happy Steve has been willing to bud ALmD, Grey Pearl, Golden Oldie, Cl Columbia from my garden and so many others from other sources. I have stated for several decades now, I NEVER want to hold the last unicorn and have it die with me. It's why I funneled all of those garbage bags full of cuttings through Sequoia and brought everything I could trade and beg from all over the country through The Huntington Library mist propagator for years and into nurseries and gardens all over. Hopefully some of them survive me, not that I have any intentions of leaving any time soon!

  • roseseek
    Original Author
    18 days ago

    That's gorgeous, Sheila!

  • Diane Brakefield
    18 days ago

    I thought it was a painting, Sheila. The pink of the sky and the pink of the rose together--exquisite. Diane

  • susan9santabarbara
    18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Kim, Ben and Sheila: serves me right for looking at pics and making a comment right before going to bed! It's very obvious looking at Ben's pics that the new growth is coming from the budded part and the top has been cut off. Duh... sorry about that. And I do already know to never question Kim's advice :-D

    roseseek thanked susan9santabarbara
  • flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
    18 days ago

    Every photo of ALM makes my heart skip a beat. I want to add that in my experience this is one super tough rose that can withstand all sorts of neglect. I ordered mine from Steve last year. It was delivered in the spring just before the heat wave and other diversions prevented me from following Steve's directions. It remained on the rootstock for months and grew very little, with all the growth going to the stock plant. I was finally able to separate them and expected poor little ALM's two tiny leaves to crumble and die, but she remained healthy and started producing lots of new growth. She was on her own for a few more months while I was unable to do anything for her except hope for the best. After I potted her up she literally took off making up for neglect and time lost. She is waiting out winter in the garage to be planted in the spring. The poor little thing has had the worst possible beginning after leaving her WI home, but is showing remarkable will to live. Thank you Kim, for giving us this lovely, determined rose. I love her already.

    roseseek thanked flowersaremusic z5 Eastern WA
  • roseseek
    Original Author
    18 days ago

    Thanks, Susan, but if you knew how many "brain farts" I experience...LOL!


  • susan9santabarbara
    17 days ago

    Kim, you're being very kind. When I re-read the thread today, Sheila clearly stated that Steve told her the multiflora had already been cut off, and this was before my post last night. I'm embarrassed, but it happens :-D

    roseseek thanked susan9santabarbara
  • roseseek
    Original Author
    17 days ago

    We all have them, so no worries. Nothing to be embarrassed about. What's a boo-boo among friends?

  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    11 days ago

    Here is mine from Steve at wiscroses!!!

    I think it looks wonderful! I'm sure it would have done well just planted out in the ground too. It is very well rooted too. Thank you Kim and Steve!!!

    roseseek thanked Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
  • roseseek
    Original Author
    11 days ago

    Wonderful, Sheila! I'm delighted Annie is 'making the rounds"!

  • BenT (9B Sunset 14)
    9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    Sheila,

    Looks like we both lucked out with terrific plants! I noticed the feeder roots were still fresh and plump, no storage, so the plant should be ready to go! I planted mine too, housing courtesy of Monrovia, Amazon Prime and Gorilla Tape.



    Thanks to Kim and Steve for such a great rose, thanks everyone for the great advice, I’m very much looking forward to growing ALM.

    roseseek thanked BenT (9B Sunset 14)
  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    9 days ago

    Yours looks great, Ben. I see you are following Kim's best idea on the soil piling around the canes. I put mine in the cool shade and it looked so fresh as far as the roots and canes and moist that I did not cover it.

    I definitely would have covered in warmer weather like you did. I have never lost a newly planted rose here.

  • roseseek
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Perfect, Ben! I've done precisely that for literally a few decades and it works. Gurney Seed once sold heavy plastic plant guards which were flat sheets with tabs and slots (like your cardboard if it were laid out as one sheet) they used to help pile mulch around plants for "winter protection". They were perfect for this use and cheap (at the time). I used them for nearly 15 years until they were too brittle and fell apart. Card board was next and I found stapling them also works well for the length of time they are required, but tap is fine, too. Whatever works. I harvested some ALmD blooms this afternoon for pollen as a few things I wish to use it on will be in flower before I can count on blooms for pollen. It smells SO good! Natural light.

    Flash

    "Potpourri"


  • roseseek
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Perfect, Ben! I've done precisely that for literally a few decades and it works. Gurney Seed once sold heavy plastic plant guards which were flat sheets with tabs and slots (like your cardboard if it were laid out as one sheet) they used to help pile mulch around plants for "winter protection". They were perfect for this use and cheap (at the time). I used them for nearly 15 years until they were too brittle and fell apart. Card board was next and I found stapling them also works well for the length of time they are required, but tap is fine, too. Whatever works. I harvested some ALmD blooms this afternoon for pollen as a few things I wish to use it on will be in flower before I can count on blooms for pollen. It smells SO good! Natural light.

    Flash

    "Potpourri"


  • Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR
    8 days ago

    Don't you worry, Kim, mine is going to work too. I agree Ben did a great job.

    roseseek thanked Sheila z8a Rogue Valley OR