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petalique

I made delicious coleslaw yesterday! (Thanks, Annie!)

petalique
9 days ago

I had made uninteresting coleslaw in the past, but gave up.


Yesterday, I got a chance to try Annie’s recipe. I used mustard seeds, then augmented the dressing with horseradish, a bit of sour cream and a bit of mayonaise. Great results.



For those used to making good coleslaw, I understand this may look ordinary, but for me, it was an accomplishment.


A few of the takeout places ask a crazy $4 for 3 oz for their slaw. And I don’t want only a tiny plastic relish cup of the stuff. Another place wanted $7 for a cup. You’d think white cabbage was platinum.


So thanks very much, Annie.

Comments (30)

  • petalique
    Original Author
    9 days ago




  • chloebud
    9 days ago

    Great pic, petalique! My favorite coleslaw has horseradish in the dressing. Really makes a difference!

    petalique thanked chloebud
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  • plllog
    9 days ago

    Looks great! I don't think I've ever had horseradish in the dressing. I'll have to try it, Ridiculous prices!

    petalique thanked plllog
  • cindy-6b/7a VA
    9 days ago

    If you can plant some horse radish, you'll be good pretty much forever.

    petalique thanked cindy-6b/7a VA
  • petalique
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Thanks. I have tried horseradish before, but that was w a mayo-based dressing. I love good slaw and didn’t know how a lot of BBQ and clam shack places made theirs. I also did not persue it. Until, a year or so ago, I read someone commenting here about Annie’s coleslaw recipe. I asked her for it and she generously shared it.


    In her recipe, she includes the dressing and says, depending on what she’s planning to serve with it, she might include horseradish or wasabi.


    I am ready to partake of another serving. Maybe I should set up shop just outside those fish takeout places ;)


    Cindy, as for growing HR, I wonder if it would take over. Soneone said that shredding it can be one eyeburning, nose dripping experience. Weeding it might prove just as invigorating.

    🤧


  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    9 days ago

    Looks good!

    I make creamy coleslaw using half mayo and half sour cream, with Dijon mustard, salt and pepper, vinegar and a bit of sugar. I'm guessing the mustard might be similar to using horseradish - gives it a little bitterness and bite.

    petalique thanked carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
  • chloebud
    9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    "I have tried horseradish before, but that was w a mayo-based dressing."

    petalique, the coleslaw dressing I make is also mayo-based.: I think horseradish adds a nice zing that some people don't realize is horseradish. My anti-horseradish kids have always loved this coleslaw dressing…

    3 T. apple cider vinegar
    2 T. sugar
    1/3 cup sour cream
    1/3 cup mayo
    1-2 T. prepared horseradish
    1 tsp. celery seed
    Pinch of salt and pepper

    ETA - Your pic inspired me to make coleslaw tonight!

    petalique thanked chloebud
  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    I've grown horseradish for at least a decade now. I have two 3'x3' raised beds dedicated to it. I mow around them so there is no chance of it spreading and taking over. Last year I made about 1.5 gallons and I freeze it in half pint and 4 oz. jars.

    It is a chore to harvest and process it in November after a few good freezes (which increases the flavor and pungency).

    These are the steps I follow.

    • Remove the raised bed frames from the beds.
    • Clip off the dead top growth from the beds.
    • Dig around from the side with a shovel and hand trowel to remove the soil around the roots of each plant
    • Pull out as much of the root as possible (I think they go down to China so you will never get all of the root). Knock off as much dirt as you can after pulling the roots.
    • After getting as much of the roots out of each bed as I can, I lay out the roots to dry for one day and then remove the rest of the loose dirt.
    • Cut the crown off any roots that have them (these will be replanted immediately for the next year's harvest).
    • Scrub the roots well with a vegetable brush.
    • Peel the roots with a veggie peeler and cut them into cubes or ~1" lengths.
    • Grind the roots with a food processor until pulverized. I grind about 1 cup at a time using a dedicated mini-prep processor. This is when the eye burning and nose dripping starts! I do it in my basement or out on my deck if the weather is decent.
    • After grinding I wait 3-4 minutes which increases the potency and then add some white vinegar and a wee bit of sugar and salt and grind again to mix it up. If it is too thick still I will add a little more vinegar. You want it thin enough where there is liquid on top when you jar it.
    • Spoon it into the jar.
    • Start grinding the next batch.
    • Replant the crowns back into the bed about 3" deep. Any roots that were missed will also grow back but it will take longer for them to come up in the spring if they are deep and the roots grown from crowns are usually much thicker.
    petalique thanked LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
  • petalique
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Thank you, lonejack!

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    This is a picture of the peeled and cubed roots before grinding.

    Garden pictures · More Info


    This is a picture of one of the beds from a few years ago. I had to move the bed another 30 yards further from the tree line of my property because tree roots started to grow into it and sucked the life out of the horseradish.

    Garden pictures · More Info


  • chloebud
    9 days ago

    LoneJack, pretty amazing! I can see what you mean regarding "...a chore to harvest and process..." but you sure seem to have it down pat! Love your pics!

  • annie1992
    9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    petalique, that looks perfect to me, not too "sloppy", and I like the bite of horseradish. The prices "they" want for coleslaw is astounding, and even a head of cabbage is crazy right now. I'll be glad when mine are ready in the garden, or available at the local farms, sheesh.


    Jack, that's some good looking horseradish. As you know, I've had some trouble starting mine, but it's coming along nicely now:



    Those are sweet potatoes in the bags on the right of my horseradish bed and the garlic bed on the left.

    We did manage to get enough to grind a little last fall, but the roots were pretty small. I'm hoping the roots underground are as big as the plants are this year!

    Annie

    petalique thanked annie1992
  • linda campbell
    8 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    I made several different coleslaw recipes. Last week I bought a bag of "slaw mix" which was cabbage with a few strands of carrot and made a slaw so yummy I couldn't keep my fork away and literlally ended up feeling pretty sick the next day.

    Pretty much I added some chopped scallions to the cabbage, mixed up a dressing of mayo and buttermilk witn a bit of sugar and then dripped in some toasted sesame oil. Mixed it with the cabbage mix and added a little salt to taste and some toasted sesame seeds....well just because!

    petalique thanked linda campbell
  • Judi
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    I like to add purple cabbage to slaw. Sometimes I'll use just purple with carrots and grated onion. I'll have to try horseradish.


    ETA --- I know it's called red cabbage, but it's purple. I've never seen a red head.

    petalique thanked Judi
  • l pinkmountain
    8 days ago

    We eat a LOT of coleslaw. It is our vegetable of choice. There are so many cool ways to dress it up.

    petalique thanked l pinkmountain
  • chloebud
    8 days ago

    “I know it's called red cabbage, but it's purple. I've never seen a red head.”

    Same with ”red” onions.

    petalique thanked chloebud
  • Jasdip
    7 days ago

    I love cabbage dishes and coleslaw. In the last few years they started selling cabbage by the lb, instead of by the head. At a buck a lb they're expensive! Sometimes I can luck out and find on on sale for $2.50.

    Hubby loved horseradish and I found some in a jar in the frig. It was dried up. Horseradish also tastes good in twice-baked potatoes.

    LoneJack, impressive plants and tutorial!

    petalique thanked Jasdip
  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    7 days ago

    Thanks Jasdip!

    Annie - I'm glad you were finally able to get your Horseradish beds established! You should be good to go forever now.

    petalique thanked LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
  • Judi
    7 days ago

    Judi, I hope you try the horseradish. The right balance of it with the other ingredients is very good.


    I put horseradish in my remoulade sauce. I may try that as a coleslaw dressing.

    petalique thanked Judi
  • chloebud
    7 days ago

    Good idea, Judi!

    petalique thanked chloebud
  • WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a
    4 days ago

    @petalique, I have searched for Annie's Coleslaw recipe and can't located it. Would you mind sharing her recipe, please.

    petalique thanked WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a
  • petalique
    Original Author
    4 days ago

    WalnutCreek and Annie D. want Annie1992’s recipe for marinated cole slaw. I got it from the forum about 2 or 3 years ago and it is half hiding elsewhere. GW/Houzz is difficult to search (although Lars posted a good technique about 2 mos. ago).


    I am going to ost the recipe she sent me, and two others I found wiyh a search. Interestingly, I spotted a photo of Annie1992’s slaw on another thread. I’ll post it here so that you can see how she shredded her cabbage very fine (in comparison to mine above).

    She notes that the chef has license to adjust the recipe.


    See her cole slaw, upper left?



    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Recipe she sent to me or posted for me:


    Annie’s (CF) Marinated Cole Slaw


    🫑🌶 This is the "basic" recipe I use for that marinated slaw. I add ingredients depending on what I'm eating it with. I like to add a big spoonful of grated horseradish if it's fish tacos, or sliced scallions and some radishes for beef and/or pork, I've even added in wasabi powder, so it's pretty versatile. I like to add some celery seed with or instead of the mustard seed too.


    Marinated Cabbage Slaw


    8 cups shredded cabbage

    2 tablespoons chopped pimientos

    1/2 cup chopped green pepper

    3/4 cup chopped onion

    1 cup sugar

    1 cup white vinegar

    1/2 cup water

    1 tbls. mustard seed


    Combine vegetables in a large bowl. Combine remaining ingredients, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, uncovered for 20-25 minutes or until slightly thickened. (I find it doesn't usually take this long, maybe 15 minutes, but my cooktop doesn't ever go low enough to simmer!)

    Pour dressing over vegetables, toss to coat, cover and refrigerator 4 hours or overnight.


    Annie


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Her recipe found with a search (hidden a bit):


    annie1992

    12 years ago

    Mine is pretty simple too, I don't even use mayo, it's more a sweet and sour kind of plain coleslaw and it has no oil, a very low fat recipe with lots of celery seed, which I like. I usually don't put the pepper in there, just cabbage and carrot.


    Coleslaw


    3 pounds medium head cabbage, coarsely shredded
    1/2 cup finely shredded carrot
    1/2 cup chopped green pepper
    1 cup sugar
    1 cup white vinegar
    3 teaspoons salt
    1 teaspoon celery seed


    In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrot and green pepper; set aside. In a small saucepan, combine the sugar, vinegar, salt and celery seed; bring to a boil. Pour over cabbage mixture; toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight. Serve with a slotted spoon. Yield: 12-16 servings.


    Nutrition Facts: 1 serving (3/4 cup) equals 73 calories, trace fat (trace saturated fat), 0 cholesterol, 459 mg sodium, 18 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 1 g protein.


    Annie

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    NOTE— it appears that the one below has less sugar; and the recipe is for less.


    annie1992

    12 years ago

    last modified: 7 years ago


    I use this one because it has no oil:

    Celery Seed Slaw


    3 - servings

    1 pounds medium head cabbage, coarsely shredded
    1/4 cup finely shredded carrot
    1/4 cup chopped green pepper
    1/3 cup sugar
    1/3 cup white vinegar
    1 teaspoons salt

    1/2 teaspoon celery seed


    In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrot and green pepper;set aside. In a small saucepan, combine the sugar, vinegar, salt and celery seed; bring to a boil. Pour over cabbage mixture; toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight. Serve with a slotted spoon.


    Oh, and I leave the green pepper out, I don't care for it in slaw. I really like this as a sandwich topping for pulled pork too, so it does double duty.

    Annie

    ========================


    (petalique’s) note:


    As I stated in my opening post, I added a bit of mayo and sour cream And a Tablespoon or prepared horseradish. A medium large white cabbage gave me 8 Cups of shredded cabbage. I found that for this (1st) recipe, the 1 Cup of sugar was a bit sweet. I will probably use only 1/2 Cup sugar the next time. I liked the whole mustard seed in it.



  • annie1992
    4 days ago

    It's a way to use up cabbage in the late summer/fall, when the garden is so generous that I can't keep up. So I make this slaw, and use it for various things, like topping fish tacos and in place of tartar sauce with fish. I think the horseradish cuts the "sweet", and I keep experimenting with the basic recipe, but I keep the mustard seed AND celery seed, I like to add both.


    Annie

    petalique thanked annie1992
  • petalique
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    Thanks again, Annie.


    I love it. I would have made a second batch by now, but didn’t have ant cabbage. I plan to add celery seed and pimento and of course he horseradish. I have some red cabbage, but will probably slice it very thin if I include it. Ican imagine it being very good on fish tacos.


  • WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a
    3 days ago
    last modified: 3 days ago

    Thank you so much for posting the recipe, @petalique. I did see the picture and note that it in the recipes it says coarsely shredded, so I think however one wants to shred it is okay.

    petalique thanked WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a
  • petalique
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    Yes, I think Annie will agree — howeven one wants to do it. I don’t always make things the same way. I am waiting for my groceries with the head of white cabbage so I can make another batch.


    If Annie published a cookbook, I’d be in line.

  • annie1992
    2 days ago

    As I have often said, taste is subjective, it isn't objective. Take any of "my" recipes and do as you will with them. Everyone likes things their way, and I'm just fine with that. I'm not fixed on "authentic" or "original" or whatever. Just cook!


    I find I've changed a lot of "my" recipes to suit my Mother, who likes things intensely sweet and it has to be fine, soft, easily chewed and hopefully eaten with her fingers. That definitely requires some adjustment to recipes, LOL. And, of course, I cook around the garden and what's in the freezer and who's going to be here for dinner. (grin)


    Just cook something, it's all good when you're at the table with people you care about.


    Annie

    petalique thanked annie1992
  • bragu_DSM 5
    20 hours ago

    I do like to put a touch of wasabi in mine. Not everyone appreciates it ... more for me!

    I also cut back on the sugar, 2/3 cup to a cup of vinegar [diabetic].


    dave

    petalique thanked bragu_DSM 5
  • petalique
    Original Author
    13 hours ago

    Annie, I agree. Just cook. And the more one cooks, the better they get at varying recipes.

    Or, maybe its a chicken and egg thing.


    You are such a thoughtful daughter.