Boneless petite sirloin roast

seagrass_gw Somewhere

My DH picked up this cut of beef, a bit over 4 lbs., it's tied to shape with string. I'm unfamiliar with it. Seems to have some marbling but not a lot. Do we roast it? He thinks he wants to put it in the pressure cooker. I have no idea. I'd like to cook it so we can enjoy leftovers, because 4+ lbs of beef is a lot for the 2 of us.

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plllog

If it’s sirloin, it’s naturally lean and doesn’t have a lot of connective tissue, . That means it’s not a good candidate for stews and braises. What to do depends a lot on the temperature you like it. If you like less than medium, you can dry roast it, but check the times. Or put a pan of water underneath and steam roast it. You can open it up and roast or pan cook it. You can cut it into chunks and do something on the stir fry spectrum. Does your husband have an idea of what he wanted it to be when he bought it?

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seagrass_gw Somewhere

He said it looked nice and it was a good price :o)


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chloebud

I agree with plllog regarding NOT using it to braise. Dry roasting is better in this case. Names can be misleading, but I'm guessing It's likely a cut from the top sirloin. I dry roast top sirloin roasts, or use it for kebabs and the stir frying plllog mentioned. I also use top sirloin often for stroganoff.

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seagrass_gw Somewhere

I don't stray into grocery stores anymore. I'm in a high risk club as far as this virus goes, so DH does almost all of the shopping. He has become a very good cook, but I've had to tutor him. The only beef besides hamburger that I know how to cook is chuck and prime rib. He comes home with surprises. I come here for help!

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chloebud

He also sounds like a keeper! ;-)

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seagrass_gw Somewhere

Chloebud - he's a retired engineer. It's frustrating but funny to interact with him in the kitchen. Everything is literal for him, he often says "that's not what the recipe says" but I've been cooking the majority of our 42 year marriage. But he has acquired a nice repertoire of recipes from the web. I cook our old favorites now.


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sushipup1

Is this a tri-tip? Bottom of the sirloin? It's a West Coast thing, and wonderful. We marinate with ginger, garlic, soy sauce, sugar and whiskey and grill it. Slice across the grain.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tri-tip

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seagrass_gw Somewhere

Sushipup1 - what I could find in our New England nomenclature it's top sirloin. Not that it means anything to me...

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plllog

Tritip wouldn't be tied.

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lindac92

I think in some areas it could be called a pie roast.
I agree roast it like a prime rib, no more well done than medium rare, slice across the grain, in thin slices. The flavor is superb! Tougher than prime rib but but not a lot. I also have potroasted/braised that roast....and it's lovely. Just don't cook it to death.
And if there is any left from your dry roast, you can braise with mushrooms onions etc.


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