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amylou321

Food floof! Snapshot!

amylou321
last year
last modified: last year

I have fallen down the YouTube rabbit hole.

Somehow, I started watching the channel "ReacThing" which contains, among other videos, videos of a Korean woman in her 70s/80s trying different foods for the first time. Lots of it classified as "American." American snacks, soul food, breakfast, things like that.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFO3DBafAYw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZnOzGRMPqi4


That led to the channel "Reactistan" which features people from another culture,i assume they are in Pakistan, given the name of the channel, (they are only describes as "tribal people" whatever that means) trying American and other foods for the first time. When i was watching some of these videos. i was thinking, "Why aren't they trying (whatever)?"


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TR0WdzaWQYM


Which leads to the floof: Lets just say you were asked to consult on such a video. Lets assume for the purpose of floof that there are no dietary restrictions involved. Lets also assume that there are no restrictions as far as transporting or preparing the food. It will be presented just as YOU want it to be. What would you present as "typical" of whatever country you are from? Pick whatever food categories you like. Whatever you would want to share with someone from somewhere else.




Me: I was raised in the American South, by "Yankee" parents.


Snacks:

-Cheetos Puffs

-BBQ Pringles

-Double Stuff Oreos

-Dill Pickle Lays

-Nacho Cheese Doritos

-Fried cheese curds

-Triscuits with easy cheese(for shock factor!) CHEESE IN A CAN?!?!?!?


Breakfast:

-Biscuits and Gravy

-Pancakes and Bacon

- A "full" breakfast would be scrambled eggs with cheese, grits or rice, bacon, sausage, and buttery toast.

-I would throw in a Sausage egg and cheese McMuffin, because i love em,even though i haven't eaten one on many years.


Desserts:

-SOME kind of cobbler. Peach or cherry. With ice cream.

-Pumpkin Pie

-Brownie Sundae

-Homemade chocolate chip cookies


If i were asked to prepare a regional plate, i.e., southern, I think i would go with:

-Smothered or Fried Pork Chops

-Mac and Cheese

-Purple Hull or black eyed peas

-Creamed corn

-Cornbread

-Some kind of green, collard or turnip or cabbage.

(All homemade by me, of course)


Other:

-Classic pot roast, cooked in a dutch oven with potatoes and carrots

-A BBQ meal (not my favorite, but i would think important to give a whole snapshot)

-Chili

- Big fat cheeseburger and fries



This is not only inspired by the YouTube videos. Not long ago, a truck driver that comes in my workplace often who is originally from England went back to visit his daughter and brought me OODLES of British snacks. Some AMAZING, some, not so much (looking at you twiglets.) All of them interesting. I was amused at the different flavors of potato chips that are available and popular over there.


Anyway, you're up. What would be on your menu?

Comments (49)

  • Kathsgrdn
    last year

    Well, I've had many foreign exchange students so it's always fun to have them try new things when they come here. For some reason I always seem to make lasagna as their first meal. I don't know why, it's something most of them like and kind of a comfort food? I am expecting two more next month. I asked my daughter what I should make for their first meal since I wanted to try something different than lasagna. I was thinking chicken soft tacos, she thought some kind of roast with mashed potatoes. She said I should pick something very American and it made me think of hot dogs and hamburgers, not a roast. I mean, what is American? Anything really since we are a melting pot. My most asked for meal from my students is spaghetti.

    My favorite breakfast to make them is my mom's egg, rice, cheese and cabbage. She was Japanese but it has bacon and American cheese in it...so I think she just made it up herself with sugar/soy sauce scrambled egg mixture after she came to the U.S. I've never found it anywhere or known anyone else who makes it. I also make my omelettes the way she did with sugar and soy sauce in the eggs.

    I also like making them funnel cakes. Fun and delicious.

    Lunch, probably chicken soft tacos. Or what I grew up eating for lunch a lot: soup and a sandwich. My favorite sandwich is white bread, Miracle Whip, Monterey Jack cheese and dry salami...first had it over one of my mom's Japanese friend's homes. Grilled cheese and tomato soup is so good.

    Another is burgers made on a grill. Sooo good. I make lots of soup and stew also so it can be eaten over several days when I'm working and all they have to do is warm it up. Vegetable beef soup is the most American one I can think of. Eaten with corn bread muffins.


    amylou321 thanked Kathsgrdn
  • plllog
    last year
    last modified: last year

    This is hard! Southern California

    Snacks

    Sunflower seeds

    Pre-cleaned sugarsnap peas and/or baby carrots

    Guacamole

    Breakfast

    Oatmeal

    Cantaloupe

    Strawberries

    Scrambled eggs or eggwhite omelette

    Dessert

    Ice Cream or frozen yoghurt

    Cookies

    Fruit salad

    Regional

    Burritos

    Hamburgers with mayonnaise or thousand island, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle, and avocado (i.e., salad inside the bun)

    Gardenburgers dressed similarly, except maybe the pickle and avocado

    Cobb Salad

    Recent addition, kale on everything. :)

    For an actual plate, a choice of any of the above (even the Cobb), salad of dark leafy greens decorated with little bits of interesting produce, orange slice, sweet potato or green bean fries or crudités.

    BUT that's a sort of public intersection.

    A typical home regional dinner main might be sushi, pho, chicken mole, roast beef and mashed potatoes, field roast, fish en papillote, etc. Pretty much anything from anywhere because the people are from anywhere.

    So I don't know that any of these are interesting and different enough to be react worthy, however. Though if they don't know melon, a really good piece of cantaloupe could do it.

    amylou321 thanked plllog
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    last year

    I'm a transplant, and so I have influences from both Texas and California.

    Snacks

    Toasted almonds
    Tortilla chips with guacamole or bean dip
    Flatbread or sliced baguette with Brie
    Hummus with lavash

    Breakfast

    Okonomiyaki
    Omelet with spinach, mushrooms, and cheese
    Grits with sausage, red bell pepper, cheese, egg, and Cajun seasoning
    Potato frittata with red bell pepper and cheese
    Spinach quiche

    Desserts

    Fresh fruit sorbet, such as cherimoya or mango
    Lemon curd tart with berries
    Chocolate crinkle cookies with ice cream

    Regional

    Quesadillas or empanadas
    Tamales
    Fajitas
    Sushi

    amylou321 thanked Lars
  • bbstx
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I was raised in the south. If I were offering regional cooking to a foreigner:

    Snacks

    Texas Caviar (made with black-eyed peas)

    Pimento Cheese

    Cheetos, crunchy

    Snickers

    Fried Pork Rinds (if you are driving past a convenience store 🙄)

    Barq’s Root Beer

    Meats

    Fried chicken

    Fried pork chops

    Baked ham

    Barbecued pork ribs

    Shrimp

    Smoked Pork Butt, pulled or chopped (plate or sandwich)


    Vegetables

    What my mother called “fried corn,” cut corn off the cob raw, “milk” the cob, cook in a cast iron skillet with a little fat to keep it from sticking. Momma probably used bacon drippings; I use butter.

    Spinach Madeline

    Butter Beans (only the tiniest)

    Yellow, crookneck squash, preferably sautéed with onions, but a casserole is okay too


    Desserts

    Banana Pudding - only made with real custard and baked meringue.

    Lemon Ice Box Pie using recipe from Eagle Brand sweetened condensed milk

    Coconut Cake

    Caramel Cake

    Strawberry Shortcake with real biscuit-like shortcakes


    Plate:

    fried catfish, turnip greens (cooked with bacon drippings, of course), and fried okra

    or

    chicken fried steak with white cream gravy, mashed potatoes, and collard greens

    Both accompanied by a large glass of sweet tea (1 gallon of tea sweetened with at least 1 cup of sugar while still warm)

    Other

    Shrimp and Grits

    Red Beans and Rice

    Brunswick Stew


    We entertained a small group from a Chinese NGO several years ago. We had dinner in our home, thinking that would be more interesting to them than going to another restaurant. I hired a chef to come in and prepare the meal. Did we serve any of the dishes I listed above? No. We had a grilled shrimp appetizer. Followed by a spinach salad with strawberries. The entree was filets. The only side dish I recall was Gruyere cheese grits. And for the life of me, I can’t tell you what dessert was. When the chef and I were trying to construct the menu, he suggested braised pork belly as the entree. DH nixed that. He’s a steak guy.

    amylou321 thanked bbstx
  • agmss15
    last year

    I love that grandma!!! I have been watching emmymadeinjapan who confusingly seems to be a Chinese American lady living in Rhode Island.

    I was raised in rural Maine but my parents are from NY and NJ respectively. They brought with them a comfort with trying a wide variety of cuisines that I have.

    Guilty pleasures....

    Many of my fellow second generation back to the landers have fond memories of access to certain ‘normal’ foods - chief among them is pb and fluff sandwiches. Fluff being gooey marshmallow spread. The bread of course being the super soft squishy bread that was most definitely not made at home.

    Those honey sesame candy sticks that I have brought to multiple jobs and everyone remembers from their childhood be they Ukrainian, Laotian, Mexican or American hippie kids.

    Breakfast

    Lox and Bagels - these are my mom’s roots.

    Somethng with Maple Syrup

    Lunch/Dinner -

    Fiddleheads (in season)

    Pizza

    Lobster

    Dessert

    Strawberry Shortcake with biscuits and real whipped cream



    amylou321 thanked agmss15
  • zepherine1963
    last year

    Just a quick post and run!

    All I can add atm is, mmmmmmm Twiglets, how I miss you!

    amylou321 thanked zepherine1963
  • ediej1209 AL Zn 7
    last year

    I grew up in Michigan, we moved to Ohio just as I was getting ready to start college and I lived there until retirement, then moved to Alabama. Married to a true WV Hillbilly!! So ...

    Appetizers:

    If I could get them fresh - fried smelt (I know, a lot of folks consider them a meal but I think a little goes a long way!)

    Mozzerella sticks with my own dipping sauce

    Marinated/grilled chicken wings

    Breakfast:

    Herbed scrambled eggs & cheese

    Waffles

    Blueberry Pancakes

    Bob Evans sausage (can't find it down here and boy howdy do I miss it!)

    Bacon

    Cream of Wheat

    Oatmeal

    Lunch:

    BLT's

    Vegetable soup

    PBJ - homemade jam, of course!

    Perfection Salad (citrus jello with finely grated cabbage and carrots and crushed pineapple with homemade mayo on top)

    Supper:

    Bratwurst on the grill

    BBQ chicken

    Frosted Meatloaf

    Lake Erie Walleye, grilled

    Hot Rolls

    Broccoli/Cheese Casserole

    Sweet corn on the cob

    Glazed Baby Carrots

    Dessert:

    Coconut Cream Pie

    Black Magic Cake - recipe from Hershey's Cocoa box

    The Ubiquitous Toll House Cookies

    Hot Fudge Sundaes

    Snacks/Other:

    Lance's Cheese Crackers with PB

    Conn's Potato Chips with lots of different dips

    Potato Skins loaded with cheese, bacon & sour cream

    Stollen ... Yes, generally found only at Christmas but if you go to Frankenmuth, MI, you can get it pretty much every day. Soooo good.

    Drinks:

    Sweet tea - I use the same proportions as BBSTX

    Freshly squeezed lemon/lime-ade

    Faygo Pop

    Vernor's Ginger Ale

    I had lots of fun thinking about my list and reading what everyone else would make. Thanks for starting this thread!



    amylou321 thanked ediej1209 AL Zn 7
  • Elizabeth
    last year
    last modified: last year

    edie^^^ My Michigan list would look mostly like your's. I do enjoy a Vernor's too, but with a pasty. My walleye comes from inland lakes. Just lovely and delicate.

    I do not like sweetened drinks at all but I see sweet tea everywhere now.

    amylou321 thanked Elizabeth
  • OutsidePlaying
    last year

    Some of these will likely be a repeat of what others have said.

    Breakfast:

    Omelette with bacon, spinach, cheese, peppers, mushrooms

    Scrambled egg cup with sausage and cheese

    Grits, plain with a dab of butter


    Plates:

    Garlic Shrimp with pasta

    My Southern plate would include fried okra, corn on the cob, peas, fresh tomatoes, cantaloupe and cornbread

    Shrimp and Grits (including chopped andouille sausage)

    Grilled grouper with a side of asparagus and maybe risotto

    Fresh tomato sandwich or BLT

    Deviled eggs with something

    Fajitas with grilled chicken


    Snack

    Brie drizzled with honey and topped with walnuts, crackers

    hummus and veggies

    Fresh peach in season

    Guacamole


    Dessert:

    Creme Brûlée

    key lime pie

    peaches or peach cobbler with ice cream



    amylou321 thanked OutsidePlaying
  • blfenton
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I'm confused by this thread (easy to do). You're all naming what you're defining as regional things and yet I eat or have available 90% of what is on all the lists and I'm on the west coast of Canada. The only things I see that we don't have are catfish and grits

    amylou - I love Cheeto Puffs

    And Lars - It would be interesting and fun to put your California sushi against my BC sushi.

    amylou321 thanked blfenton
  • mollycats
    last year

    Edie

    Have you tried Steve Evans sausage? He is Bob's brother and his sausage is delicious! My local Walmart sells it but, I'm only a few miles from the Bob Evans farm. I highly recommend it if you liked the old BE recipe.

    amylou321 thanked mollycats
  • ediej1209 AL Zn 7
    last year

    mollycats, down here in Alabama it's Jimmy Deans, Tennessee Pride or Deans. Not a fan of any of them. I make do with the TN Pride if I really need sausage. It's funny the things you miss!

    amylou321 thanked ediej1209 AL Zn 7
  • sjerin
    last year

    Kathsgarden, may I ask where your exchange students are coming from?

    amylou321 thanked sjerin
  • plllog
    last year

    Blfenton, you're right. My own list is typical local food, but it's just food. OTOH, much of it might be less normal to someone from a very different food culture. Anywhere in North America you're going to be able to find most of what we're listing, but is it typical and representative of where you live? We have a lot of grits eating people in SoCal, but it's as much a “foreign” food as crepes or empanadas. Which are just as well known and made in people's homes and popular restaurants. ScCal culture post WWII made the hamburger what it is today, but I'm told by people from elsewhere that the whole salad with dressing is specific and typical of us, but even that has been exported all over the world. Burritos are as typical and popular, though a lot of people buy the home style ones frozen nowadays rather than rolling their own (non-restaurant style is a flour tortilla in one hand, a scoop of chili con carne or refried beans (hot) on top to fill your hand, sides folded in, ends rolled over, ready to eat, warms and fills you.)

    amylou321 thanked plllog
  • hallngarden
    last year

    Breakfast—cantaloupe with cream gravy ,grits with sausage, always cured our ham and sausage. Lunch— pimento cheese sandwich, cheese doodles, watermelon. Supper —-fried chicken, biscuits, rice with cream gravy, sweet tea, fried okra, homemade ice cream. Snack- boiled peanuts

    amylou321 thanked hallngarden
  • OutsidePlaying
    last year

    I didn’t know we supposed to remain regional either, but most of mine probably were.

    I forgot a couple of other favorites. With tomatoes almost ready to ripen, how could I forget fried green tomatoes! I make them once or twice during the summer, too with homemade remoulade and a few pieces of crispy bacon. It’s a meal.

    As for snacks, I also forgot pimento cheese on celery. Peanut butter (or almond butter) is a good too.

    amylou321 thanked OutsidePlaying
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year

    "ScCal culture post WWII made the hamburger what it is today, but I'm told by people from elsewhere that the whole salad with dressing is specific and typical of us,"

    Having lived and spent time (and continue to do so) in both NorCal and SoCal, I don't think the popularity of eating salads is all that different between the two areas. I'll remind you that the "Salad Bowl of the World", the Salinas Valley, is in NorCal. Before the availability of widespread refrigerated transportation, people ate what was grown locally and for NorCal areas, that included leafy greens from the Salinas area. I know that some of this is grown in coastal adjacent areas in SoCal (I'm thinking some parts of Oxnard and San Diego as examples) but the output is small in comparison.

    amylou321 thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • sprtphntc7a
    last year

    Mid-Atlantic Region/ Philly suburb

    Breakfast: eggs with bacon, sausage, ham, pork roll or scrapple ( i don't eat scrapple), bagels with cream cheese, bagel & egg sandwich, oatmeal, cream of wheat, pancakes or waffles

    Lunch: lunchmeat sandwich, peanut butter and jelly, various fruit, Herr's chips, tuna fish, chicken salad.

    Dinner: cheesesteak of course - dinner or lunch, chicken cutlets, stews, stuffed peppers, eggplant parmigiana, soups, big salad with choice of protein, roast pork sandwiches with broccoli rabe,

    snack; nuts, cheese, cottage cheese with fruit, greek yogurt with fruit, fruit, lance's crackers with peanut butter...

    amylou321 thanked sprtphntc7a
  • Kathsgrdn
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Sjerin, South Korea and Japan. The one coming from Germany is delaying a year due to the pandemic. A good thing, since I'm pretty sure there are still travel restrictions from Europe in place. I am wondering if it is going to go on as planned, though. Are their families really going to send them into our country the way we are dealing the Covid 19?

    (I didn't know about the regional thing either. I just kind of rambled in my post from early this morning. I basically picked things from my house. lol)

    amylou321 thanked Kathsgrdn
  • plllog
    last year
    last modified: last year

    1st post--Hamburgers with mayonnaise or thousand island, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickle, and avocado (i.e., salad inside the bun).

    2nd post--SoCal culture post WWII made the hamburger what it is today, but I'm told by people from elsewhere that the whole salad with dressing is specific and typical of us, but even that has been exported all over the world.

    Second was referring to the first. I get it that the antecedent wasn't obvious, but I wasn't claiming that we had some kind of magic ownership of salad (though the Cobb salad, which has very little green (and why a small green salad served with it isn't silly), is a Hollywood native and most common IME within 150 miles of the Brown Derby). East coast natives I've known get positively angry at mayonnaise (or mayo based "sauce") slathered willynilly on hamburger buns. Some locals don't like it either, but they just ask for hold the mayo without the drama.

    It is true, though, that in any part of California, a green salad is a staple food like grits are in the South. :)

    amylou321 thanked plllog
  • bbstx
    last year

    I didn’t address breakfast, mainly because I’m a late adopter of breakfast. However, here are things I watched my father and my grandparents eat for breakfast.


    Breakfast

    Plate: Country ham (or bacon or sausage patties), eggs, grits, biscuits, red-eye gravy, and in the summer, sliced tomatoes

    Biscuits with sorghum molasses or muscadine jelly

    Waffles

    Daddy said when he was a child, they often had fried chicken for breakfast. We didn’t.

    amylou321 thanked bbstx
  • seagrass_gw Cape Cod
    last year

    In the summer, meals revolve around fruits de mer since we live on Cape Cod and fresh tomatoes, corn, all kinds of backyard grown vegetables and herbs. We don't eat much beef or pork in the summertime. Breakfast is usually granola with Greek yogurt and fruit, Lunch is often a big salad. Dinners are fish/shellfish or sometime poultry with pasta or rice and vegetables. Our desserts might involve fresh blueberries or peaches - cobblers or pies.

    amylou321 thanked seagrass_gw Cape Cod
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Okay, that wasn't clear. I've never heard of the vegetable stuff put on a hamburger or any other sandwich referred to as "salad". Sometimes it's "what do you want on it", or "what veggies do you want", or "what produce do you want". Not "salad" though, that's a new one.

    Are you a SoCal native as I am? Maybe the terminology varies around the area.

    And yes, of course mayo is required. And if you like ketchup with the mayo too, that's what thousand island dressing is, a la Bob's Big Boy from Burbank originally and such dressing is still available (made under license) in stores. Thankfully.

    amylou321 thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • seagrass_gw Cape Cod
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Elmer, I grew up in the Midwest. When we wanted lettuce, tomato, & onion we asked for a burger "through the garden."

    amylou321 thanked seagrass_gw Cape Cod
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year

    Oh, I forgot to include:

    "though the Cobb salad, which has very little green (and why a small green salad served with it isn't silly), is a Hollywood native and most common IME within 150 miles of the Brown Derby"

    You should venture out and about more. Cobb salads are very known and popular in the Bay Area, well beyond your arbitrary 150 mile range from Hollywood. And, I suspect, in many other places far and wide.

    amylou321 thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • Lars
    last year
    last modified: last year

    blfenton,

    I've had sushi in Vancouver, and it was good, but not better than what I get in L.A. I think Los Angeles has the largest Japanese population in North America, but not as large as Hawaii, which is where I've had the best sushi.

    One sushi restaurant in Beverly Hills is popular with people in Japan, who will fly to Los Angeles to visit this restaurant. There are quite a few sushi restaurants in BH. I've not been to Vancouver since 1992😱 and so I guess I'm overdue!

    There are some very good izakaya restaurants in L.A. as well, and I'm sure you have those in B.C. now also.

    I live close to a lot of Japanese markets, and so I frequently make Japanese food. I'm a lot further from Chinese and Latin markets in L.A. The best Chinese food is in Monterey Park, an hour east of where I live. The closest restaurant to my house is Ethiopian, and I like it very much but have had trouble making authentic injera bread myself. I have teff flour in my freezer, however, I think. When I have visitor, I take them to the Ethiopian restaurant or the Persian restaurant that is also close.

    amylou321 thanked Lars
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year
    last modified: last year

    lars, next time you frequent mid-range (not top tier) sushi and "Japanese" restaurants, pay close attention. Most these days are owned and run by ethnic Korean folks. Their joke on us, most Americans can't tell the difference.

    There has not been significant numbers of Japanese immigrants to the US (and the West Coast, a favorite destination) for decades. Running restaurants is a solid starting point for first generation immigrants (with some means) to any country to get an economic toehold for themselves and families. Members of subsequent generations can move up the economic food chain through education and a better head start. Few stay in the occupations their immigrant ancestors had.

    The dry cleaners we use is owned and run by a (now elderly) Korean couple. They've been there 30 years or more, >12 hours a day 6 days a week. They have two sons - one is a physician, the other is a dentist. They're of course quite proud of them and it's quite a success for two immigrants (who still don't speak English all that well) but they continue to work into their 70s because that's the life they know.

    A funny side story to the side story - I speak to the husband in German - he was converted to Christianity by a German speaking missionary group in Korea ages ago and learned the language before learning English. His German is rather better still. He has German religious passages on the walls and asking about them is how I found out. "Gott im Himmel,,,,,"

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  • Kathsgrdn
    last year
    last modified: last year

    I agree with you Elmer, 99% of the Japanese restaurants here are owned by Korean or Chinese, or mixed race people. I only know of one in Lexington that is owned by Japanese people and the only time I went in there with my daughter and our Korean exchange student we were completely ignored so we left and I haven't been back since.


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  • nicole___
    last year

    Elmer...Red Robin is a chain restaurant, they have a cobb salad. It has a bed of lettuce. Is this not authentic?

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  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Huh?

    My comment was to the person who suggested that Cobb salads were most common, in HER experience, within 150 miles of Hollywood, CA.

    To which I said - No, I don't think so. I knew by legend it was first concocted at the Hollywood Brown Derby sometime in the 1930s, and maybe so. A few years have passed since then and others have had it and spread it.

    I don't know Red Robin, I generally don't eat at restaurant chains.

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  • amylou321
    Original Author
    last year

    I am adding fried pickles to my list. With ranch to dip em in and I would also insist on Krispy Kreme. Both the original and my favorites, the chocolate filled and the kreme filled.

    A truck driver,who said he is originally from Nigeria, told me today he just discovered Krispy Kreme and now he cant get enough. He had 3 dozen in his truck and offered me one. He was trying to spread the word of the doughnut I guess. 😄

    He's been coming in here for months. And has been in America for several years. I cant believe it took him that long,which is why it's going on my list.

  • plllog
    last year

    Nicole, an authentic Brown Derby Cobb salad had iceberg, romaine, endive and watercress, but no dark greens, and nowadays, both in restaurants and people's homes you're lucky to get much lettuce at all. If chain restaurants are serving it, it's getting more popular. For many years, people from outside of SoCal (yes, I'm a native) whom I encountered over salads had never heard of it, though it was a very popular thing many years ago. I concede to Elmer that where L.A. transplants live in large numbers, there might be a more lasting Cobb salad scene. Considering it's named after the owner of the Brown Derby, I feel confident that it originated there, as the annals attest. The argument is whether it was Cobb or the chef who invented it. What is true, is that it's been enduringly popular here, though some adjust the ingredients to fit what they have or can afford, like substituting blue cheese for roquefort.

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  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year
    last modified: last year

    "I concede to Elmer that where L.A. transplants live in large numbers, there might be a more lasting Cobb salad scene. "

    That isn't what I said and that isn't the reason. Nice try.

    I remember having a good Cobb salad in NY City once. Why do I remember? My travel experiences around the US are that I need to compromise my love of good salads (and until the last 15 years or so, and except in fancy restaurants, good wine) when I leave home. Was that NYC restaurant owned by Angelenos?

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  • amylou321
    Original Author
    last year

    I wouldn't serve a salad as a snapshot of American cuisine...........

    But that's just me.

  • OutsidePlaying
    last year

    Plllog, I don’t know what experience you have had in the south, but the everyday, at home breakfast ’staple’ in the south is not necessarily grits. Sure it is highly popular dish in southern restaurants for breakfast, as grits are easily available in the south. I would say grits are almost as popular in a restaurant here for breakfast as a green salad is on a dinner menu.

    And oh my goodness, I have been eating Cobb salads for around 50 years in the south. Who knew!?

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  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Outside, that's only because there are so many LA transplants living in the South.

    ;-)

    The participant above skipped over and didn't answer my question about whether she was a SoCal local or not, when I asked about her saying "salad" to describe veggies typically put on a hamburger in these parts. I hadn't heard that usage before and so misunderstood. Absent a response, I'll take that as a No answer and that she's from another state. No problem, we're a state of immigrants and migrants.

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  • annie1992
    last year

    Even in the Midwest itself I think there are regional differences. Here a burger with lettuce/tomato/mayo is known as "deluxe". If you want "everything", it's really just catsup/mustard/pickles/onions and "everything but" means no onions, just catsup/mustard/pickles. Sometimes pickle relish replaces the pickles.

    Although I'm from Michigan and my family has been here for several generations, some of Great-Grandma's regional/native foods still appear. She was from Buckhorn, Canada, and Grandpa's favorite breakfast food was pie, but more commonly breakfast consisted of fried fish and frybread. Peameal bacon was more common than ham and although we sometimes had bacon it was more likely to be side pork, which is just unsmoked pork belly, sliced like bacon. And "porridge", usually corn meal mush (ugh), drizzled with maple syrup.

    Lunch? Pasties, of course, and lunch was more commonly referred to as "dinner". It was the biggest meal of the day and always included boiled potatoes and various types of wild game, from rabbit or squirrel (in the form of stew) to venison and bear and game birds like pheasant, partridge, ducks, geese. Wild turkeys were not prevalent when I was a child, although they have been "re-introduced" and are everywhere now. We were heavy on vegetables, fresh from the garden in the summer and from the root cellar in the winter. Summer would be tomatoes, cucumbers, fresh lettuce, green beans, corn, melons of various types. Winter was turnips, rutabaga, carrots, parsnips, beets, cabbage and sauerkraut. Homemade bread, always white and soft, sometimes including leftover mashed potato.

    Supper was the smaller meal at the end of the day and was sometimes just soup and a sandwich, or soup and bread. Sandwiches could be beef tongue, headcheese or a piece of meat leftover from "dinner". It was never larger than a serving of meat, boiled potatoes and a vegetable.

    Now, "times" are different, so my menu of typical foods would probably be:

    Breakfast:

    Peameal Bacon

    Eggs

    Frybread

    Cornmeal mush, refrigerated and sliced, then fried and drizzled with maple syrup

    Lunch:

    Pasties, the traditional ones, made with minced beef, onions, potatoes and rutabaga

    Supper

    Cream of asparagus soup

    Venison tenderloin with morels and ramps

    Lake Michigan perch or salmon

    Baked potatoes (not just boiled, sorry Grandma)

    White dinner rolls, sweet, soft, yeasty and full of butter, like Grandma's

    Dessert:

    Cherry pie (or rhubarb)

    Wild blackberry dumplings

    Molasses Cookies

    Snacks:

    Faygo pop or Vernor's Gingerale

    Ice Cream with Sanders topping

    Mackinac Island Fudge

    Better Made potato chips

    Various meat jerkies from local smokehouses

    Edie, we've always eaten smelt, although I'm "weird" and like mine dipped in cocktail sauce. I've also found that they make a passable fish taco, definitely not something that's common here, LOL.

    Annie







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  • bragu_DSM 5
    last year

    Annie ... last time you made that, I swear we 'smelt it' all the way down here in Iowa ...


    *grin*

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  • plllog
    last year

    Lack of a response indicates one has other things to do but answer silly questions. Lack of information is the poorest proof ever, and is in fact proof of nothing at all. The answers are already existent up topic.

    I already acknowledged that my second use of the word "salad" for hamburger toppings without repetition of the context was my fault. It's actually people from Boston who said, "I don't want no stinkin' salad on my hamburger" and worse things about mayonnaise.


    Outside Playing, we have grits in California. You can buy them in the grocery store, and there are also restaurants that serve them. The South is a big place and I don't claim to know much about the cuisine there. I have been told by Southerners that grits were a staple and might be served at any meal, the way potatoes are in other parts of the country. If this isn't true, I apologize. Here, green salad is often eaten instead of a starch, though less likely at breakfast. No one would ever think that grits were typical fare here. Pho is more common, I think.

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  • bbstx
    last year
    last modified: last year

    Plllog, I think your comment about grits being served at any meal in the South is absolutely accurate, at least in my experience. I commented that we served Gruyere Grits to our Chinese guests as a side dish for filet mignon. I also listed Shrimp and Grits as a dish that I would serve as representative of my region. Just this morning, I was thinking that I needed to make up a batch of Gruyere Grits to freeze in meal size portions.

    P, your comment about salad on a burger reminded me of our trip to Australia. On a couple of occasions DH or DD ordered a burger. It was listed as coming with salad. We expected a small side salad. We finally learned that “salad” meant lettuce on the burger. I regret that we never chose to have a slice of beet on our burger. When we returned, a woman who worked for me who was married to an Aussie told me that it was pretty classic.

    I also agree with Outside Playing, that grits are not served every day at breakfast in the South. My momma never served them, but my daddy would eat them every chance he got. Nevertheless, I would say that grits are often served at breakfast in the south, see pic below of instant grits in individual packets. Just for fun, I googled “Southern Living grits.” Boy, are there lots of ways to cook grits! I’m not sure, but I think grits became less regional when Jimmy Carter went into the White House. I have a vague recollection of people trying to figure out the singular of grits.



    Annie, my mom must have been kin to your grandpa. She thought the finest breakfast was a piece of chocolate pie! I just looked up “peameal bacon.” I found it is what the North American Meat Institute calls “Canadian bacon.” I’ve had plenty of Canadian bacon, except I’ve never seen Canadian bacon rolled in cornmeal. Interesting. Thanks for sending me on the quest to figure it out!

    Elmer, bless you little trollish heart, you’re just not happy until you’ve insulted someone, are you?

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  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year

    Do you think so? Bless your heart.

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  • lucillle
    last year

    insulted

    Here in the South there are times when if one perceives an insult, an appropriate reply might be to invite the insulter to 'Kiss one's Grits'...

    I've never had gruyere grits, would love to see a recipe please.

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  • nickel_kg
    last year

    A story about "salad" as toppings. Twenty years ago, DH, DD and I took a vacation to England. We landed in London, exhausted, worn out, and jet lagged. Dropped luggage at hotel but couldn't check in for a couple hours. Hungry. T.I.R.E.D. And, did I say jet lagged? We walked around to keep from falling asleep on a park bench, saw a convenient sandwich shop. My brain had barely enough juice to ask for the roast beef sandwich. Then the man politely asked, "Do you want salad on that". Whuuut? Brain not working. Did.... I... want... salad... .??? ... my sandwich? Massive jet lag. Stood there maybe with mouth open, I don't know. Man said "ok then" and named some price and started helping his next customer. Brain still trying to get mouth to say "no salad thank you but how about some lettuce and tomato on the sandwich". DH and I looked at weird money, brains still operating s.l.o.w.l.y. That's when it registered that "salad" referred to lettuce, tomato, and maybe other fixings but it was too late to try for a 'correction' of our purchase. Lord only knows what that shopkeeper thought of me!

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  • lucillle
    last year

    Thank you it looks delicious!

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  • annie1992
    last year

    bbstyx, peameal bacon isn't Canadian Bacon, because it's not smoked. It's made with pork loin, like Canadian Bacon, and it's cured in brine, but it's never smoked. It's rolled in cornmeal, used to be peameal but that's almost never found now. Slice it thinly and fry it and serve it for breakfast. It's very regional, I've never seen it outside the Toronto area, even in other parts of Canada.

    I asked Grandpa once about pie for breakfast. He asked me how it was so different from pancakes and fruit sauce, or toast and jelly. He was right, of course, Grandpa was always right!

    Yeah, Bragu, I turned on the fan, just so it would blow your way. (grin)

    Annie

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  • lucillle
    last year

    I made gruyere grits for dinner. So extremely wonderful!

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  • Lars
    last year

    In my particular neighborhood, the Japanese far outnumber the Koreans, and West L.A. is also known as Little Osaka, although it has been renamed Sawtelle, for its main street. There are a handful of Korean restaurants here, but they advertise as being Korean, including the one Korean sushi restaurant in Culver City that I know of. There is a particularly good Korean restaurant in Marina Del Rey. I don't know of anyone in my neighborhood who confuses Japanese and Korean food, although that might happen in your neighborhood. Here, Japanese is dominant, whereas in Koreatown, Korean is dominant. My next door neighbor is Japanese, as are quite a few others in my neighborhood.

    I generally get sushi at a Japanese market, such as Mitsuwa or Marukai, however, as I do not feel the need to go to restaurants. I cannot vouch for the ethnicity of the sushi chefs at Gelson's and Bristol Farms, but what they produce is indistinguishable from what I get at Japanese markets. I have to go much further to a Korean market, and even further for a Chinese market. There is an Indonesian market in Culver City that is fairly close, however. If I want Thai groceries, I go to Hollywood.

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  • Elmer J Fudd
    last year
    last modified: last year

    lars, I lived in that area in the 60s and have had friends and family there since. I know it well.

    Yes, there is a small Japanese-American (not Japanese) community there, south of the VA with Sawtelle as the major street. There used to be a number of Japanese-American owned nurseries thereabouts too. And yes, there are plenty of Japanese markets in that area and to the south.

    My comment stands, which you read either too hastily or discarded. My experience is that the majority of mid-range sushi and "Japanese" restaurants in coastal California (SF Bay area and SoCal) are owned and operated by people who are ethnically Korean. Call them Korean-Americans. A few are Chinese owned and operated too.

    Of course Korean food and Japanese food are very different. That's not a factor for what I was suggesting.

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