British things Americans might find odd......

yoyobon_gw

Here's a delightful blog you might enjoy !

http://www.lostinthepond.com/2014/01/5-british-food-combinations-americans.html#.XkRp0o7Yqt0


One British breakfast dish which I always find very odd is eggs, bacon served with baked beans and fried tomatoes.

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colleenoz

That seems quite normal to me. I might also have some fried mushrooms and some people also have fried black pudding, which is a kind of blood sausage.

Everything in the blog I would eat, except the chips with curry sauce. (Well, maybe :-) .) I;m not fond of soggy chips. Chips and beef gravy are popular here. I don't mind it if I can dip the chips into the gravy rather than have it poured over the bowl of chips.

I do like the American pancakes with maple syrup and bacon or sausage, but I was brought up eating that. Family and friends here are grossed out by it.

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yoyobon_gw

I personally am not against eating leftovers for breakfast....spaghetti being one of my favorites ! I'm not a big fan of traditional breakfast fare.

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carolyn_ky

I find leftover pie for breakfast preferable to spaghetti!

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colleenoz

I love leftovers for breakfast. Leftover pizza or Chinese food is probably my favourite :-D

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friedag

Could we have kippers for breakfast?
Mummy dear, mummy dear
They got to have 'em in Texas
'Cause everyone's a millionaire.

The above lyrics from the song "Breakfast in America" by the English rock/pop band Supertramp have amused me with their absurdities. People in Texas that I've known are surprised to hear that the English have ever thought 'everyone' in Texas is rich, and Texans say, "Huh? What the hell are kippers?" I didn't know what kippers were, either, until I had 'em in England -- for breakfast! Not bad, I have to admit.

However, I never could get used to bloaters. The fish themselves taste all right, but the name makes them almost indigestible -- in my mind.

I like leftover beef stew for breakfast. After sitting over night in the fridge, when it is reheated it is so much tastier! Mark Twain called that melding of flavors "swamping together." I've called it swamping ever since I was a kid when I first read it in Huckleberry Finn.

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vee_new

I don't think the list above, is meant to be of food eaten only at breakfast! The 'fry-up' as Colleen describes is very common as an all-day meal, especially in pubs and cheaper cafes. The ubiquitous fish and chips, or chips served with curry sauce (yuk) or chips covered in grated cheese (another yuk) are becoming less common as the variety of take-out places . . . .pizza, Thai, Chinese, Indian have largely taken over.

Boiled eggs are a very civilised way to start the day. Yes, served in an egg-cup and eaten with an egg spoon, slightly smaller than a tea-spoon, and kept warm with an egg-cosy; often knitted by an ancient Great Aunt. 'Soldiers' of toast or bread and butter are not compulsory but good to soak up the soft yolk.

Frieda, kippers have become much less common over here as has smoked haddock. The quality and availability of herrings is partly the problem and almost no-one seems to have the time to sit-down at a properly laid table and eat a nourishing meal first thing in the morning.

Over here during the last 30-40 years we have become slaves to the US cereal manufacturers. Whole supermarket isles are dedicated to their sugary, starchy wares. They are all over the TV ads . .. and long gone are the days in which my Father would say "There's more goodness in the cardboard packet." Hence I grew up in a cereal-free house!

I wonder how many of RP'ers grew up with a 'proper' breakfast served by our busy Mothers, or when/if as mothers ourselves we did the same for our children?

I'm just giving my halo a quick polish here as I always provided a 'cooked' brekkie for my kids as my Mother had done for me.

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annpanagain

Vee, I had to check with my D as to what I did for breakfasts around the late 60s, early 70s, when my two were going to school. She replied "Weet-Bix and Rice Bubbles." I think I made porridge in the cooler weather though.

I never had a proper cooking stove for many years as the house originally had a woodburning one when we bought it in 1965. I sold that promptly and bought a small electric appliance that sat on a counter top. It baked and had a top element for two saucepans. It was meant as a temporary measure but I never got around to buying another as it did well enough.

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yoyobon_gw

I only recall having Rice Krispies , Corn Flakes, Shredded Wheat as choices for breakfast. When I could choose my own cereal in a box I liked Corn Pops.

Mom liked to make me soft-boiled eggs which I really enjoyed. Does anyone bother making a soft egg any more ?!

As a side note: In reading books written by British or Australian authors I notice that many words are given an odd little "diminutive" form such as "brekkie" ( see Vee's post above) , "argy ( argument) " ......and more that aren't coming to mind at the moment. This is not common in the US. Or did I miss it !?

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msmeow

Ann, you don't eat pancakes in Australia?! I love pancakes. :) I have a friend who used to put ketchup on them because she doesn't like syrup.

Bon, something I've seen in a lot of British books is a phrase such as, "He set the coffee cup on the side and left the room", or "she saw the vase sitting on the side". What is a "side" in this context?

Donna

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yoyobon_gw

Donna......sideboard ?

re: catsup + pancakes = GAGGING UNCONTROLLABLY

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annpanagain

We certainly do eat pancakes. My Retirement Village is having a Pancake Tuesday event...all welcome!

I would read the "side" as being a small table next to a chair or sofa or the sideboard as a repository for a cup or vase. The text isn't really clear.

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carolyn_ky

My mother cooked breakfast every morning until my father died. He liked meat, so we had a lot of fried ham, bacon, or sausage, eggs, Southern-style biscuits (not cookies, Vee and Ann), and milk gravy. I have never liked soft eggs--can only eat them scrambled with applesauce alongside or now, since discovering Penzey's spices, a mixture called Sunny Paris that has chopped chives in it and is very tasty and good at killing that eggy-ness.

My daughter started school during a time of double sessions due to overcrowded schools (when the boomers were just beginning to be a phenomenom), and they went to school half days. They only got a milk break, and fearing starvation for her, I insisted she eat either a scrambled egg or a small bowl of oatmeal every morning. She still holds it against me, never having liked to eat early in the mornings.

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vee_new

Pancakes only cooked on Shrove Tuesday in this household and while growing up. They were always the big thin ones that filled the whole pan crepe style, not the small ones I think you have in the US. We call those Scotch pancakes and they used to be served as part of a Scottish High Tea; maybe they still are. And that was/is a carbo filled meal loved by us as children when visiting Scotland!

Donna re 'he set the cup on the side' . . . probably means just that he put it to 'one side'. The writer could just as easily said 'He set the cup down' and over here we don't usually say 'set down' but 'put down'; although we do 'set' a table' ie lay a table. It can all become complicated!

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vee_new

Carolyn, over here there is such a growing worry about obesity in children that many schools run 'breakfast clubs' usually for a small charge, where the kids arrive early and are given cereal, toast and juice, which is certainly better than nothing. Also all schools are now required to provide a free cooked healthy school lunch for the first three? years of education. I know the pupils at our small village school enjoy sitting down together to eat and apparently their levels of concentration don't fall during the afternoon. And some of them get to use a knife and fork correctly . . . something that is lacking today a many families/kids eat using their fingers, in front of the TV!

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annpanagain

The small pancakes are called "pikelets" here. You can buy a pack in the supermarket. Eaten hot or cold and spread with honey or butter and jam or sprinkled when hot with lemon juice and sugar.

I made my first lot from crepe mixture and got some comments about the thickness...or lack...from the men in my new Australian family! A kind SiL said that they were special ones!

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vee_new

Annpan, 'pikelet' is used in the English Midlands and North . . . or used to be back in the day.

yoyo , you asked about diminutives of words. Of course I can't think of any off hand for the UK . . but they are used a lot in Australia . . . tinnies, bevvies, frosties (ie cans of beer) stored in an esky to keep cool while waiting for the barbi to heat up followed by a swim in your cossie/budgy smugglers. I don't know how accurate any of the spelling is!

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yoyobon_gw

I wonder how that started? Or is it due to the playful nature of the Aussies ? :0)

The only examples on this side that come to mind are mani and pedi ....short versions of services provided at day spas.

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colleenoz

Australians shorten heaps of words. “O” is also a shortener- “Garbo” (garbage collector), “servo”- service station, “bottle-o”- bottle shop/liquor store, “Damo”- Damien, etc. We also have “Chrissy pressies” around December 25. I think it’s the casualness of the Australian attitude.

I remember being invited to a new friend’s home for pancakes soon after we arrived in Australia. I was very surprised to find the pancakes were large in diameter and thin -no leavening-, and served sprinkled with lemon juice and sugar and rolled up. Fifty years later I still think that’s weird :-D

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annpanagain

Colleen, I put the habit of shortening words down to the heat! Why expend energy on long words and don't open your mouth for too long and let the flies in!

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woodnymph2_gw

Childhood breakfast in Atlanta: My father was quite the fisherman, so I can recall being served fish with scrambled eggs, or better yet, shad roe for breakfast, years ago. I have never liked traditional American breakfast foods: I detest cereals, scrambled eggs, and absolutely hate bacon and toast. So my mother learned early on to prepare for me other foods, such as the sort of meats we might eat at dinner.

It was not until I spent a year living in Paris that I discovered my type of breakfast favorites: strong coffee, fruit, and a croissant. That is still my preference, with yoghurt. I do not have a strong appetite early in the morning.

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yoyobon_gw

LOL.....Ann, that is funny .

Colleen, what you were served 50 years ago sounds more like a crepe, not a pancake which definitely has leavening in the recipe and consequently some loft to it.

yoghurt .....yogurt.....how do you spell it ?

I always use yogurt, no H.

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woodnymph2_gw

Yoyo, I googled your query. It would seem both spellings are correct, depending on where you live. "Yogurt" is the preferred American spelling currently. "Yoghurt" is preferred by those who live outside of North America. I probably picked up my spelling of it when I lived in Europe.

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colleenoz

Yoyo, it certainly was a pancake. British style pancakes are pretty well identical to crepes and have no leavening. Back in the late 60s in Western Australia, British style cooking was the norm unless you had migrated from somewhere else, and the British-descended majority locals tended to eye their food with suspicion.

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Rosefolly

My favorite breakfast is oatmeal with some kind of dried fruit, usually raisins, and recently I have begun adding walnuts, served with skim (nonfat) milk. I actually prefer skim milk. Once a week for a change Tom and I go out for eggs over easy and buttered rye toast. I can eat bigger breakfasts, but if I do my waistline pays the price. Oh, also coffee, lots of coffee.

I do enjoy the British eggs with tomato and beans breakfast when traveling in England or New Zealand, but never do it here at home. Just too much food. And I'm not crazy about pancakes though I do prefer them to waffles which I've never much liked.

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annpanagain

Colleen, I have always made pancakes with self-raising flour, milk and an egg.

Then I saw a TV chef add some heated butter to the mixture, drained from coating the pan and I did that afterwards.

That recipe makes quite good pancakes! What other ingredient would you add for "leavening"?

Has anyone heard of the first pancake in a batch being called "One for the dog"? It is because the first one is a tester for the heat and condition of the pan! I think I have come across this expression but can't remember where.

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vee_new

Annpan 'one for the dog' and pancakes brings back childhood memories of my father attempting to toss the first pancake which missed the pan on the way down . . . falling on the dog's back. Dad tried to scrape it off and was surprised none of us wanted to eat it!

I suppose it was more a case of 'hair of the dog'.

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yoyobon_gw

One of the most delicious pancake recipes I have made is from an Australian recipe I found recently which includes ricotta . It is called Ricotta Hotcakes and also included Honeycomb butter ( which I didn't prepare). It is based on a recipe from Bills in Sydney.

The leavening is from both baking powder and whipped egg whites folded into the batter.

https://grabyourfork.blogspot.com/2008/11/bill-grangers-ricotta-hotcakes.html

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colleenoz

Annpan, I've got old British cookbooks and old Australian books which don't use SR flour for pancakes, they use plain. The only leavening is the egg.

I call the first pancake "the sacrifice to the pancake gods" :-D

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annpanagain

Colleen, that would come out more dense than I would like. I never read any recipe after my first effort at making pikelets, as I mentioned earlier. I just made pancakes as I saw other people do them.

Who gets to eat "the sacrifice" at your place? We had an obliging dog who ate most things but baulked at a plateful of leftover jelly from a birthday party!

She gave me the most pitiful look!

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colleenoz

If I don't eat it, it goes in the bin. Cats don't seem to like pancakes :-D

The pancakes are made very thin, as crepes.

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lemonhead101

Upthread, there was some talk about the abbreviating of some words. I know we used to do it growing up in England during the 1970s (when mum, amazingly and kindly, cooked up full breakfast every morning.) I remember "Chrissie pressies" (and still call them that), cozzie (for swimming costume - I was a competitive swimmer for ages), libee (for library), and others. I don't think it's limited to Australia and the sun. ;-)

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Rosefolly

So what are Chrissie pressies?

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colleenoz

Christmas presents.

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astrokath

As an Aussie (notice the shortening) I had cereal and/or toast for breakfast as a child. I love a cooked brekkie, but prefer to have it as brunch.

When I travel, I like to try the local food. I don't mind grits, but the gravy that comes with biscuits just looks wrong to me. Gravy should be brown :) I love a full English/Scottish/Irish breakfast, but without the blood pudding.

Pikelets were occasional treats in our house, eaten with sugar and lemon or Golden Syrup. I make mine with self raising flour.

A final comment is to add that the same foods are called different things in different places. Sultanas seem to be exclusively Australian - we have raisins but they are bigger than US raisins which are (as far as I can tell) the same as sultanas.

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colleenoz

In the US they refer to sultanas as "white raisins".

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msmeow

Kath, that white sausage gravy that is served with biscuits will give you a heart attack! LOL White gravy is served with country fried steak, too, but without the sausage in it.

I don't think anyone has mentioned French toast in the breakfast discussion. I love it even more than pancakes! It's a good thing I can't cook, or I'd probably make pancakes and French toast a lot and be really fat. :)

Donna

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yoyobon_gw

Astro.......thankfully you'll never find grits or white gravy on biscuits in the northeast ! We favor hash browns (pan fried potatoes) , eggs and some sort of breakfast meat such as bacon, sausage or ham slice.

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msmeow

Bon, do you have scrapple in NY? We first encountered it in Pennsylvania (I think) and were thoroughly disgusted by it. They have it on the menu at Bob Evans restaurants here in FL, but they call it golden mush.

PS - I love grits, too, but can't stand Cream of Wheat. :)

Donna

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carolyn_ky

Another difference is our mutual language is that in the U.S. flour to which baking powder and salt have been added is called self-rising flour rather than self-raising. So, does it rise or is it raised?

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astrokath

Donna, it's possibly better that I don't know what's in sausage gravy! I do know that it was served at a buffet dinner at a conference my husband attended in the US and most of the Australians were confused by it. I was able to tell them what it was, but I don't think any of them took much :)

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colleenoz

I guess you could describe sausage gravy as like savoury mince, but made with sausage meat and milk instead of mince and water.

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friedag

Carolyn, you have probably noticed in the British books you read that British employees who want an increase in theirs wages will ask for a pay "rise" instead of a pay "raise" that American employees prefer.

Donna, I call that white floury gravy served with country-fried steak "Kindergarten paste" because it looks and tastes to me just like the goo we Iowan Kindergarten pupils used to adhere pieces of paper to other objects. I know because I was one of those kids who tasted the paste! I didn't like it then, and I never developed a taste for the 'gravy' equivalent. It's too raw tasting, I think, and almost sweet (from the added milk?).

One time at a restaurant (in Alabama) when I was quite obviously pregnant I couldn't face trying to eat the white goop, so I asked the order taker to have the stuff left off my country steak. Instead I asked if there was a bottle of Tabasco or Louisiana hot sauce available. She brought me a bottle and then purposefully waited to see what I was going to do with it. I liberally doused my steak with it in lieu of the gravy. The waitress was so astonished that she exclaimed, "I hope your baby kicks you all night long!"

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vee_new

So the next question is . . . What is country-fried steak? Also never heard of sausage gravy. If it is made with some sort of sausage meat, why would you add it to another type of meat eg beef?

Just to add, when I lived in Ottawa and went into the city to meet friends, we would often go to a restaurant popular with female secretaries from the various Embassies and High Commissions. The favourite lunch for the 'local' girls was always a cheese/egg/ham sandwich covered in hot gravy served with a side order of coleslaw. All washed down with a glass of Coke. I'm sorry to say that to me it seemed a revolting combination!

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colleenoz

The sausage gravy is essentially sausagemeat crumbled and fried off with onions, then sprinkled with flour and milk poured in to make a white gravy with crumbled sausagemeat in it. This isn’t a dressing for cooked meat, but is ladled over hot American biscuits/scones.

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yoyobon_gw

Donna, scrapple is a Pennsylvania Dutch food ......not at all common in diners or restaurants here in NY .

And I have to repeat for those not in the US......white gravy and biscuits or "chicken fried" steak are very much southern foods, not overly relished by those who weren't born and raised with it !

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vee_new

Thanks Colleen. So when Frieda mentioned above her 'white goop' served with steak, it was not quite sausage gravy or maybe Alabama is not typical or even more Southern?

And we too also had that 'Kindergarten' style paste, a mixture of flour and water . . . it was better at sticking in our hair than in holding bits of paper together.

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yoyobon_gw

Speaking of kindergarten paste......I remember that the paste came in a huge jar and the teacher would tell us to take out a scrap of paper and she'd go along and smear our allotment of paste onto it with a ruler.

Some kids would actually eat it ! eeew.

Does anyone recall the bottle of LePage's glue with the rubber applicator tip with the slit in it ? That was a step up from the white paste.

I never learned the trick with the paper clip.

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astrokath

We had that type of glue dispenser, although it wasn't LePage's and I can't remember the brand. The glue most used at school was called Clag, and it was translucent white and the lid had a brush through it.


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friedag

Vee, I can't think of the name(s) of English equivalents to U.S. chicken-fried or country-fried meats, but I know you have them in some parts of England because I've eaten them there -- particularly in North Yorkshire and Teesside, I think.

Schnitzel is the Austrian/German name; Milanesa is Italian and Argentinian; Escalope is the French; and there is some form, with various names, in other parts of the world. Just about any kind of meat can be used: veal, beef, lamb, mutton, pork, venison, chicken, turkey, etc. Whichever is chosen, it is in general fairly thinly sliced, then tenderized by pounding with a mallet, rolling pin, or just a heavy stick. Sometimes a bit of flour is pounded into the meat, then the meat is dipped into a beaten egg mixture and this coated meat is dredged in a seasoned flour mixture or breadcrumbs. It is pan-fried in some form of fat until the breading is browned. Some folk will cook it on a griddle or 'oven-fry' it.

Typically some sort of sauce or gravy is served atop the meat -- sometimes just melted cheese. Some of these are simply deglazing of the cooking pan, others involve a more complex roux, and sometimes it's just a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Does that help you identify the English/British versions?

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carolyn_ky

Our Kentucky sausage gravy doesn't have onion in it. It is ground, seasoned pork sausage fried and crumbled and added to a salted, medium-thick roux made with milk. Plain milk gravy, if it is too thick, may be yucky, but good sausage gravy isn't. Well, maybe you have to be born to it. Tastes like Christmas breakfast to me!

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annpanagain

Vienna Schnitzel here!

I would use breadcrumbs to coat the meat and now panko crumbs is the fashion, I think. Butchers sell it ready to cook.

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vee_new

Thank you for all the chicken/steak/schnitzel comments.

Annpan I haven't had a Vienna Schnitzel since the '60's at the German restaurant in London's Charlotte St Soho! No longer on English menus.

I think we would just call your sausage gravy sauce . . . which over here is always a roux base, made with milk to which parsley other herbs or cheese had been added and in my childhood was used as a disguise for over-boiled carrots, onions or the hated marrow.

Frieda, my Mother, with a glance towards her American heritage used to do fried chicken. But she wasn't much of a cook so it was often rather underdone.

Steak is considered something of a luxury here as it is very expensive and was always grilled (broiled?) although done in a hot pan is better.

Frieda will be familiar with lamb/mutton chops which along with pork chops used to be a staple on UK menus. My Great Grandfather would eat them for breakfast.

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vee_new

yoyo, that glue, with a different name was common; it is probably still available. We also had a thick white glue, sold in round tins with a plastic 'spreader' that sat in a central well. It smelt strongly of almonds and we used to sniff it!

Was this the beginning of a life of substance abuse?!

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colleenoz

Sausage gravy really can't be described as "sauce" as it has a fair amount of cooked crumbled sausagemeat in it... it's more like the filling of a cottage pie, but made with sausagemeat instead of mince and milk instead of water. Maybe a little runnier than cottage pie filling but not much.

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astrokath

I love lamb chops but never for breakfast, always an evening meal.

Schnitzels are popular pub food here, originally called Wiener Schnitzel, but we seem to have lost the Austrian connection. Actually, given the Australian propensity for abbreviations, discussed above, they are often called schnitties. A pub usually offers chicken or beef, with a variety of sauces such as gravy, mushroom, diane etc. Another favourite is chicken parmigiana (called a parmie of course) which is a tomato based sauce with cheese melted on top.

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yoyobon_gw

astrokath.....lol...."parmie" " schnitties" .....oh my , that last one could get dicey !

In googling Australian diminutive slang I found that it is actually a feature of the Australian English language. Interesting.




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colleenoz

Parmi and a coldie...doesn’t get much better :-D

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carolyn_ky

A chain restaurant here called Olive Garden has Eggplant Parmesan on the menu which is the only eggplant I've ever really liked except a dish of eggplant with unknown seasonings I ate in Turkey once that was delicious.

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vee_new

Kath, re 'pub food'. Over here the usual menu includes fish and chips served with mushy peas (which I can't stand), a wide variety of 'pies' including steak and ale, chicken, minced beef all served with chips (ie French fries) and possibly a few lettuce leaves on the side, lasagna and a 'veggie' dish. Of course there are a few up-market places that offer a more adventurous menu.

Many pubs now do an 'all day breakfast' ie fried stuff as mentioned above and a Sunday Roast.

This used to be the bed-rock and highlight of the weekend, except for Mother labouring in a hot kitchen. Now the family can go out to their local and enjoy roast beef, pork, lamb, (often ALL served on the same plate) with Yorkshire pud, veggies and the ever-ready brown gravy. The price often includes a pud, so can be good value for money.

Of course it means that come Monday there are no cold cuts/leftovers on which to feed the family. And by Tuesday nothing to mince and turn into a shepherds/cottage pie. Little gets wasted in our household!

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msmeow

Vee, what makes the peas mushy? I like green peas. I usually get them frozen and heat them in the microwave.

Donna

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annpanagain

Vee, I hear you! Sometimes if the joint was a good size, we had stew on Wednesday. Thursday was often Sausage Toad and Friday fish and chips. Saturday depended on what we fancied from the local market as we did the weekly veggie shop there.

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colleenoz

msmeow, mushy peas are made from dried marrowfat peas that have been soaked overnight and then simmered with a bit of bicarbonate of soda to make them soft. It’s a bit like really really thick pea soup without the ham. I quite like them.

I was remembering today another Aussie nickname, for the band AC/DC. It’s usually referred to as “Acca Dacca”.

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yoyobon_gw

Donna, I think they are similar to what we call split pea soup , My Sicilian nonna used to make that and serve it with elbow or other macaroni in it. It is the Sicilian version of "pasta e fagioli......or as non-Italians call it " pasta fazool".

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colleenoz

Mushy peas are much thicker than split pea soup, and the peas used are a different variety. (Like the difference between, say, Roma tomatoes and cherry tomatoes.) They have a consistency about the same as pate.

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friedag

Colleen, when I first ran across "Acca Dacca" in print and spelled out that way, I thought it was a different Australian band, not AC/DC. I (logically to me) thought it must be pronounced with sibilant 's' sounds, but I was soon corrected by someone and told the double 'c' sounds like a hard 'k'. Is that correct? I understand now that it is an affectionate name and terms of endearment don't necessarily have to make any logical sense.:-)

Above you mentioned "garbo" as the shortened term for garbage collector (a human?). In parts of the U.S. the garbage disposal machine in a kitchen sink is called a "garbo" because a popular brand name of such machines is a "Garbolator."

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msmeow

Thanks for the info on mushy peas! Frieda, I’ve never heard of the brand Garbolator. We’ve always had Insinkerator brand garbage disposals. Lately I’ve been hearing that we’re not supposed to use them because it puts too much gunk (mostly fat) in the city water treatment system.

Donna

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yoyobon_gw

My cooked split peas end up very thick....not soupy

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vee_new

I think the mushy peas served in pubs over here come from huge 'catering size' cans and are quite soupy, not nearly as solid as pate. In no way could they be cut with a knife, they would be better eaten with a spoon. Donna, they are pale, insipid green and taste very mealy.

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friedag

Donna, I have had Insinkerator brand garbage disposals, too. I had to go look in my kitchen sink to see which one I currently have. It has "Garbolator" imprinted around the metal ring at the opening. I searched on the internet to see if Garbolator is a west-of-the-Mississippi thing. I didn't find many mentions, so perhaps that brand is now defunct or at least rare. However, I think "garbo" is said so habitually in some places that many people I know would still call whatever brand name they have a garbo, and the act the machine performs would remain as the verb garbolate. (It's like Xerox as a noun and a verb, I suppose.)

My garbage disposal is several years old. I only occasionally use it, because I've heard those warnings you mentioned. I've seen gross photos of the results, as well!

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colleenoz

Yes Frieda, it's a hard "k" sound- I debated spelling it "Akka Dakka". And "garbos" are human. We don't have sink garbage disposal units in Australia.

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vee_new

I don't think many people in the UK have a garbage disposal unit in their sink.

But as for trade-names that have now become the recognised 'name' for the machine, over here we almost always refer to a vacuum cleaner as a 'Hoover' whether or not it was manufactured by the company of that name.

I'm sure there are other eg's.

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astrokath

Thermos is another brand that has come to mean the item, in this case a vacuum flask.

Acca Dacca rhymes with Macca's - which is what we call McDonalds :)

I remember long discussions here on what words rhyme in various accents - for instance my 'aunt' sounds exactly like 'aren't' - which makes describing how a word is said very difficult. Do you remember the video I made to show my accent?

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vee_new

Kath, I do! I thought is was excellent and don't know why no-one else commented on it at the time.

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woodnymph2_gw

Coming late to the table---- just wanted to put in a good word for Southern cuisine and grits. Shrimp and grits are a staple at some of the best restaurants here in Charleston, SC. I was never a fan of grits until I moved to this city. In case you have not noticed, southern cuisine is having a renaissance on the the culinary scene.

Having said that, I would not touch "fried steak", etc. I used to see it frequently on menus when I lived in West Virginia, years ago.

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yoyobon_gw

Kleenex is another brand that has come to me the object as well.

The good nuns used to call them wipes. Rather icky term. They'd seem to always have them tucked up into their sleeves, a habit a tend to have as well when no pocket is available !

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friedag

Kath, I remember your video demonstrating your accent. I watched/listened to it probably a.dozen times. Yours was the first South Australian accent that I was sure was different from other Australian accents I had heard.

Btw, I recently was told that the names Anna and Arna (spelling?) are pronounced the same with an authentic South Australian accent. I have no reason to doubt that as it reminds me of the dog's 'paws', pronounced pores (to my ears) in SA, which I recall was featured in your video. You can verify it for me, though. :-)

Vee, I made several comments about Kath's video. But I think you are right that no other RPer attempted to make a similar video/audio of her own accent. . . none that I know of anyway.


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astrokath

No, we pronounce Anna with a short ‘a’, quite different to Arna. However you are right about paw sounding the same as pore (and poor and pour LOL).

The South Australian accent is more RP than the eastern states. We say ‘grarf’ rather than ‘graff’ for instance, which causes much mirth among the easterners.

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astrokath

Yoyo, Kleenex didn't catch on here. It's a brand we have but we call them generically tissues.

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colleenoz

Kath, a tip for writing Australian pronounciation phonetically is that you need to think in terms of the foreign person reading it rather than an Australian. For instance, if I said "grarf" with an American accent, it would sound very different to what you intend. An American would spell it "grahf" (almost rhymes with midwest American "off" (actually in WA we say it that way too :-) ) as opposed to the eastern states "graff" (rhymes with "half").

I used to think about this sort of thing a lot in the shower because I had to coach my West Aussie Sweet Adelines chorus to sing with a mid-west American accent. The vowels produce the best sound in this art form- if you "lock and ring" chords (sing each voice part's note with a pure harmonic) it creates a fifth harmonic which gives the impression that it's a five-note chord instead of the four voices actually singing.

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