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amylou321

Food Floof! Potluck Specialty

amylou321
3 years ago
last modified: 3 years ago

The potluck thread inspired me. I do not partake in potluck food unless its a family affair. And even those i cook most of the food for! But i find myself contributing to quite a few of them. I will only contribute if they give my something specific. None of that, "oh just bring a side" or "just bring whatever." I think that is a recipe for disaster. Those potlucks tend to end up with 7 kinds of potato salad, 12 apple pies and no meat. That's usually not a problem, though. People always ask for one of two things: sometimes both: My Macaroni and Cheese or my Cream cheese and Olive chip dip. And NO family gathering is complete without my olive bruschetta. My two oldest nieces eat that stuff like crazy and WAIT by the oven for it to come out!
The first year I was employed at the job i work now, they asked me to bring 3 desserts. I was still a temp at the time so i broke my "no specifics" rule. My mom made her ridiculous cheesecake and apple pie bars and I made Chocolate banana pudding. I get requests for those yearly, although I usually just bring the pudding and the Mac and cheese. My mom would be thrilled to make her specialties, but the logistics to make it work are just too annoying. This year I may not even sign up to bring anything. If they ask me anyway, I will bring it, but I may not volunteer.
I send 2 huge pans of mac and cheese to my sisters' church for their monthly potluck.
I am NOT conceited by nature, but as mac and cheese is something of a southern specialty, I must say I am flattered that people request MINE. And my recipe is so basic! no weird spices or funny flavors! And i never bring any leftovers home.
What is your potluck specialty? Is it specifically requested or do you bring it because its your very best and want to share? Feel free to share recipes!

Comments (69)

  • sjerin
    3 years ago

    Bob, would you care to post your mushroom recipe? Many years ago we were visiting relatives and my s-i-l brought some stuffed mushrooms out to the pool that she had bought at a store and baked. Perhaps I was rather hungry, but I remember how good those suckers tasted, like it was yesterday! They were similar to what you describe.

    amylou321 thanked sjerin
  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    3 years ago

    I love potlucks!! I have never had issues with sanitation concerns with other folks' contributions, as that is not a major concern of mine and foods were always stored at appropriate temps until ready to serve, so I tend not to worry about that either :-)

    Employee potlucks with various employers have been most of my experience, aside from family situations. And they have uniformly been great events, with the employer providing the meat or main dish (ham, bbq'd salmon, Costco rotisserie chickens, etc.) and the employees providing all the sides. There has always been a good range of various dishes, as we usually signed up and noted what we were bringing well ahead of time and those who signed up first got the biggest range to pick from.

    At one place, we had contests for the best sides - vegetable or potato dishes, salads, appetizers, desserts, etc., and that stimulated some great and creative contributions.

    I dislike store bought contributions but understand that some folks just do not have the skills nor the desire (or sometimes the budget) to get more involved with the food prep.

    I never had a standby potluck item to bring but instead brought whatever seemed to be lacking in the spread or what I felt like creating. Family potlucks are very different and various family members are routinely asked to bring specific dishes that they are known for - with my sister, it is guacamole or a cheese tray or a salad. With me it is usually lemon bars, English trifle (at Christmas), deviled eggs or other appetizers.

    amylou321 thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
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  • DawnInCal
    3 years ago

    Back when I was doing work potlucks, one of the teachers always brought frozen orange chicken from Costco's frozen foods section. All that had to be done with it was to heat it up and everyone liked that dish. There was never any left at the end of the event.

    amylou321 thanked DawnInCal
  • Chi
    3 years ago

    I'm definitely the baker/dessert-bringer. Probably the most requested are the salted brown butter rice krispy treats from Smitten Kitchen (which I love because they are so easy). And the caramel apple cheesecake pie, which is sort of a mix of apple pie, pecan pie and cheesecake.

    Where I used to work, I had an unofficial baking company and would take custom orders. One Thanksgiving I baked about 50 pies and different desserts!

    I bake from scratch for almost everything, but I will say that I get far more rave reviews for my Ghiradelli boxed brownies than the super intricate and decadent homemade brownies I've made!

    amylou321 thanked Chi
  • Fun2BHere
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I stopped cooking for the one potluck I attend annually because I noticed that a lot of the people would only eat the items that were store-bought.

    amylou321 thanked Fun2BHere
  • Rusty
    3 years ago

    The only potlucks I've ever been to were either family, a church women's group, or boy scout 'banquets', first for sons, then for grandsons. It was only at the boy scout functions that I didn't pretty well know everyone. I have never been concerned about about how/where the food was prepared, after all, the person who brought it was alive and healthy, and I assumed they ate their own cooking regularly, so why would one serving have adverse affects on me? I have never gotten sick, or even mildly upset from potluck offerings.

    I understand not everyone will bring homemade dishes for whatever reason, and that's fine. Personally, I pass up the obviously store-bought offerings if possible. Why would I want to eat something I can go buy myself whenever I want to? I'd a whole lot rather sample new-to-me dishes. Even the common, everyday type offerings can have quite different twists on them, and I enjoy that.

    For my contributions, I usually make either pea salad, 'Penny' salad (sliced partially cooked and marinated carrots, etc.) or a pasta salad with salmon. And whichever it is, there is never any left to take home. I finally got smart and leave a serving home for myself to have later.

    Rusty

    amylou321 thanked Rusty
  • marilyn_c
    3 years ago

    I have a pea salad recipe that I call "pea salad for those who don't like pea salad". That would be me. It travels well. It is 2 bags of frozen petite peas. You don't cook them. Add chopped celery, purple onion, and bacon. Dress with mayo thinned with Zesty Italian dressing. Stir in a handful of peanuts. When I make it for myself at home, I use walnuts, because I don't like peanuts.

    I also have taken shrimp cole slaw. It is just cabbage, carrots and purple onions, shrimp, and dressing from mayo, Italian dressing, and I add garlic powder, white pepper, onion powder, and a little Tony Chachere's cajun seasoning. I don't like sweet cole slaw and this is really good and easy.

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  • glenda_al
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Have been, for many years, the coordinator for monthly luncheon, for a social group I belong to.

    We mainly eat out as people prefer due to the amt of prep they do before our potlucks.

    Range in attendance to 15-40.


    We have a huge potluck Christmas. Last year, we had 47. Plus a spring and fall picnic.

    I enjoy taking a farmers casserole. Picnics everyone likes my homemade pimento cheese and crackers. Sometimes I will make grape salad, that everyone loves. PLUS times I take green and red grapes, with cubes of sharp cheddar cheese and pepper jack cubes. Toothpicks included :o)



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  • annie1992
    3 years ago

    Gardengal, we have some of those "non cooks" too. We always know that they will bring soft drinks or chips or contribute to the plates and plastic ware. It's all good and especially if there are children they love things like potato or tortilla chips.

    We had one employee who would bring sushi, he lived in a large town and commuted here. He didn't make it, he ordered ahead and had it made, then picked it up the morning of the potluck. I always looked for it and it was good, and he brought extra wasabi just for me.

    Annie


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  • Hot Rod
    3 years ago

    I need the cream cheese/olive dip recipe, please. And thank you!

    amylou321 thanked Hot Rod
  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    2- 8oz packages cream cheese

    1-small can chopped black olives (i think its 4 oz, but i am not sure. the small one. and for sure get the chopped, not sliced)

    -oh...i don't know....about 1/8-1/4 cup roughly - the brine from a jar of pimento stuffed green olives

    a couple tablespoons of grated onion with the juice. I use the smallest grater and grate directly into the bowl. This is to taste.

    Put all the ingredients into a mixer bowl and mix until blended.

    Thats it.

    Sorry its not more exact, this is one of those family recipes that everyone just knows the correct amounts for. I will caution that if you use too much green olive brine, it may get a little grainy.

    This recipe is for one batch. I will usually triple it and the bowl gets cleaned out. Its good on chips(get the ruffly kind, not the thin ones,) pretzels, crackers, and even as a sandwich spread or veggie dip. It is a bit thick, and its okay to leave it out to soften for a few minutes before serving.

    It sounds odd, i know, but it really is a big hit. Even kids like it. I always make individual bowls of it for my nieces and nephews. I do that because it makes them feel special, and honestly to prevent the double dipping in the larger bowl. ew. They know that they can come and refill their bowl however many times they want.

  • functionthenlook
    3 years ago

    Usually I ask what category they are lacking dishes for and make something in that category. But if it is what ever I found out deviled eggs are always a big hit. For some reason people think they are hard to make. They are sooo easy. I sometimes make that hot meatballs in the grape jelly sauce. I forget the name of it. Hobo baked beans or a pineapple upside down cake. It depends on the weather and if there is electric available.

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  • Elmer J Fudd
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    amy, your recipe sounds good. I'd describe that as olive-flavored cream cheese, more cream cheese than olives. A variation to try would be to morph that into cream cheese flavored tapinade, more tapinade than cream cheese. .

    Tapinade is a dish you may know of finely chopped olives but with other flavors, including some garlic and anchovy. The flavor is better (in my opinion) when several different types of olives are used, black and green ones. I think a dip having a proportion with more tapinade and less cream cheese would be interesting. With or without onions, I think I'll try it myself next time we have people over. Thanks for the inspiration.

    amylou321 thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Sure Elmer! Sometimes i will chop up some of those green olives too and throw them in there. This is just the standard recipe that is required, it seems, at every event, family or otherwise, that i attend. If i do make a variation, i had better still have some of the original recipe to go with it! If you do make it please let me know how you like it. (or not, tastes are personal and someone not liking my recipe will not hurt my feelings in the least.)

    And the best way to eat it IMO, is still on some ruffled potato chips. It IS chip dip after all!!!!!

  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago

    Here a picture of the dip, made last week for my family's big summer get together. Ignore the sour cream and parm in the background, I had a lot of dishes going on at the same time.

    My oldest sisters kids call this "dibs dip" because they like to call dibs on it, and pretend that it makes a difference. :)

  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Deviled eggs with bacon and cayenne

    Potato salad. I forgot the dill! But I did stop and get some on the way to redeem myself. And in case you were worried, it IS in a pink bowl. My favorite Mason cash pink hearts bowl.

    Loaded cauliflower casserole

    Cheesy meatballs in homemade sauce! I used the little pot of oil in the back to fry an apple pie for SO.....

    The pie mentioned above. Made with extra LOOOOOVE. :)

    That's a sample of what I made for the get together. There were lots of other dishes that I made and i had to invade my sisters fridge to store it all! And there were a few I made the day of at my parents house. (My hot spinach artichoke dip, shrimp, buffalo chicken dip,stuff like that that needs to be made the day of...But these are what i took pictures of. Mainly to send to my sister to taunt her kids with. ;) None of them like Mac and Cheese, so there was no use trying to taunt them with a picture if it.....

  • Ava
    3 years ago

    Amy, your potato salad looks very different. Would you share what's in it?

    amylou321 thanked Ava
  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Sure Ava!

    This particular time i was provided with a giant bag of baby potatoes, both red and yukon gold. I cut them in half or quarters, skin on. Boiled in heavily salted water.

    Celery, onion (red this time, i usually prefer scallions but ya gotta work with what you've got!)-finely chopped

    Hard boiled eggs, chopped, as many or as little as you like.

    Mayo, enough to coat to your taste

    Fresh dill. Its not in the picture. I didn't add it until the day of, because i forgot to ask for it and was not going to go to the store just for dill. But it is important. Fresh not dried.

    Pepper and more salt if needed.

    Add a cup of love. Mix until combined. Serve in a pink bowl, not optional. :)

    It is not a typical potato salad i know. No pickle relish, no sugar, no mustard. It really has NO place here in the south, but we like it!

  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Dawn, I make a stuffed tomato for nibbles too! I hollow them out and stuff them with a mix of crumbled bacon, mayo, green onion and Parmesan cheese. They are SOOOOO fiddly so i don't make them often but they are well loved! I usually use small Romas, cut in half and hollowed out, to make a more substantial bite than the little cherry ones. (not to mention that they are not as maddening to prep)

    Function, I don't like making deviled eggs myself, even though i end up doing it all the time. They are easy,but like my little stuffed tomatoes, i consider them "fiddly" The peeling, the scooping, the mixing, and then re-filling those tiny little holes. Whew. When I am in a cooking marathon like i was a week ago , i always make the deviled eggs first, to get them out of the way. If i wait until later, I may not have the patience after 5 hours or so of cooking!!!

  • bbstx
    3 years ago

    If bob c_ville doesn’t come back with his recipe, try this one. I entered it as written, but I don’t use large mushroom caps. I try to get the ones that are one or two bites at most.

    amylou321 thanked bbstx
  • nicole___
    3 years ago

    Taco Salad - Vegetarian

    1 head iceberg lettuce, chopped into bite sized pieces

    3 Roma tomatoes diced

    2 cups grated cheddar cheese

    1 bag tortilla chips, crumbled

    4 oz can diced mild green chilies

    18 oz can chili beans with sauce/use the whole thing

    1 bottle Green Goddess dressing

    Mix.serve chilled

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  • PRO
    Anglophilia
    3 years ago

    I love tapenade and I love cream cheese with olives (green olives). They each have a different place in my life.


    I used to take a block of cream cheese and then chop up green olives with pimento. The amount used varied - just kept putting them in and mixing until the proportions pleased me.


    I love it spread on crackers, but my favorite is to make a sandwich. As a child, I mother made these for me on good white bread - delicious to take with me in my lunch bucket. Later, I discovered how delicious these were grilled - all gooey and divine.


    Tapenade? I love it on crusty french bread or crackers. I would not want an entire sandwich - flavor is a bit too intense for that.

    amylou321 thanked Anglophilia
  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Well, I have an olive bread recipe that is a big hit. Kind of tapenade-y.

    Mayo

    Shredded mozzerella cheese(twice as much as mayo)

    Chopped black olives

    Chopped up pimento stuffed green olives

    Fresh garlic(well, I use the preminced stuff in a jar because I hate how garlic stink lingers on my hands)

    Dried oregano

    Mix together and refrigerate overnight.

    You can add some seeded and diced tomatoes if you want, I don't.

    Spread a generous amount on slices of baguette and bake at 400 until bubbly on top and crispy on the bottom.

  • Chi
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    This is a simple and exceptional tapenade if anyone is looking for a recipe. I think it's better the next day, or at least sitting a few hours for the flavors to meld. I think cream cheese would be a nice addition - I'll try that next time as I always make this at Thanksgiving.

    Artichoke-Olive Crostini
    Adapted from Mario Batali

    1 garlic clove, peeled and smashed
    1 cup large green pitted olives
    1 tablespoon capers, rinsed and drained
    1 15-ounce can of artichoke hearts, drained
    1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    8 large slices of crusty bread

    1. Preheat the oven to 400°F. In a food processor, process the garlic, olives, capers, artichoke hearts and olive oil to a coarse paste.

    2. Toast the bread on the oven rack for 6 minutes, or until crisp and browned. Spread the olive paste thickly over the toasts and serve.

    Do ahead: The olive paste can be refrigerated for 2 days. Let it return to room temperature before using.

    I've also heard good things about Pioneer Woman's olive cheese bread, but I haven't tried it. Sounds similar to Amy's.

    https://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/olive_cheese_br/

    amylou321 thanked Chi
  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I just looked at your link. Yup, hers is similar to mine. The base is pretty much the same: mayo,olives and cheese. (I dont use butter in mine.....i SHOULD) But hers has scallions and no herbs or spices and mine has garlic and oregano. We use different cheeses but I think they are pretty much interchangeable. (I use mozzerella and she uses Monterey jack) Hers looks just as delicious!!!!! I serve mine as individual crostini type things. Hers is more like a big loaf that you cut into chunks. Mmmmmmm.

  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    3 years ago

    I usually bring some type of appetizer to a pot luck. Lately I've been bringing a crock pot of meat balls and a warmer tray full of Jalapeno popper wonton cups that everyone raves about.

    I used to cook up a big batch of buffalo wings when chicken wings were still relatively cheap but I don't do that very often now that wing prices have gotten stupid. Every now and then my grocer will have 3 lb. bags of frozen wings on sale for $5 (normal price is $9-10/bag) and I buy 4 or 5 bags. Hopefully they will have them on sale again before the football season starts so I can take buffalo wings to the Chiefs watch parties.

    amylou321 thanked LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
  • Sherry
    3 years ago

    LoneJack, I hear you about the wings, lol. They used to be 39 cents per pound on sale and 99 cents was expensive. The last I saw were $4.99 a pound! Forget that. I buy boneless chicken bsts on sale, cut into small oblongs and go from there.

    amylou321 thanked Sherry
  • bob_cville
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I found my recipe in a previous gardenweb post along with several other stuffed mushroom recipes:

    https://www.gardenweb.com/discussions/2519425/stuffed-mushrooms#n=10

    -----------------------------------

    One of my oldest T&T recipes is for
    stuffed-mushroom caps. They are relatively easy to make a day or so
    ahead, and then you merely pop them in the oven for 10 minutes or so and
    serve them.

    Bob's Magical Mushrooms
    1 lb white mushrooms
    12 oz cream cheese
    3 Tbsp butter
    1 tsp minced garlic
    4 slices of provolone cheese
    3 green onions (chopped fine)

    Remove stem and cut away the lower half of the mushroom exposing the gills
    Soften cream cheese in microwave, mix garlic and green onions into cream cheese.
    Melt butter in small dish, mix in garlic
    For each mushroom, spoon the cream cheese mixture into the mushroom, then
    dip the top into the butter, and place in a glass baking pan. Then cover the top of the cream cheese with provolone cheese.
    The above amount should fill a 13x9 baking pan.

    At this point you can refrigerate overnight.

    Preheat oven to 400 deg F
    Bake for 10-12 minutes until the provolone is melted and the mushrooms are cooked.
    Serve immediately.


    amylou321 thanked bob_cville
  • FlamingO in AR
    3 years ago

    I like to bring creamed cucumbers, it is always a hit, never any leftover. Cold and creamy. Or a cornbread casserole.

    amylou321 thanked FlamingO in AR
  • DawnInCal
    3 years ago

    Yep, Amy, those stuffed tomatoes are fiddly, but they sure taste good! If I made them more often, I'd get some sort of syringe or cake decorating tube to stuff the guacamole/bacon bits in to speed up filling the tomatoes. Hmmmm...I may be onto something there!

    amylou321 thanked DawnInCal
  • plllog
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Dawn, I got a Wilton cake decorating press for filling deviled eggs. It's fantastic! Much easier to control than a pastry bag, easier to fill, and easier to compress the air out of, less wasted stuck to the sides (close to none), has the right sized tips (big enough for egg, though if it's not big enough for bacon bits, you can get a bigger tip), plus there's a longer narrower one for putting jam in pastries etc., a translucent body so you can still see what you have, and the whole shebang goes in the dishwasher. Check it out. It's inexpensive too.


    amylou321 thanked plllog
  • Lukki Irish
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    I work from home, so pot lucks don’t happen for me anymore. However, years ago, I’d make a rice dish that everyone really liked and was always gone by the end of the day. It’s something I threw together one night when I didn’t really feel like cooking and quickly became a family favorite.

    1 large box of Rice A Roni, chicken flavor,

    1 medium size jar of Pace Salsa. I use mild, but anything similar would work.

    1 package of pork chops.

    Dice the pork chops and brown in a fry pan with a little bit of oil until the pieces are cooked.

    Remove the pork and brown the rice in the same pan and oil.

    Once the rice is browned, add the pork, salsa, a about 3/4 of the water recommended and the chicken boullion.

    Stir and simmer until rice is done, about 20 minutes. It’s soooo yummy.

    amylou321 thanked Lukki Irish
  • naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan
    3 years ago

    LoneJack, I never thought I'd see the day when boneless, skinless chicken breasts were almost always priced lower than chicken wings. But it is the norm now. It seems like wings are mostly just carriers for assorted sauces. I like tigereyes suggestion of cutting the breast meat into winglike shapes. No need to deal with bones. I can see a crock pot full of BBQ breast-wings being a new potluck dish for me.

    For spring and summer potlucks I like to make something with garden fresh produce that non-gardeners don't get to enjoy often. Early in the year it may be a rhubarb crisp, later a 3 bean salad or kale salad. I've had people tell me that they love desserts with rhubarb but either can not find it for sale or will not pay $4 a pound or more. Sometimes they get a bundle of stalks from my next harvest.

    amylou321 thanked naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan
  • Sherry
    3 years ago

    I made this the other night and it was great. However, why I am posting is because this is how I was talking about cutting the boneless white meat for any wing recipe.

    https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/firecracker_chicken/

    I had to delete my original post, because I used the flagged word to refer to the boneless white meat chicken. It would show for me, but would not post so everyone could see it.

    amylou321 thanked Sherry
  • Sherry
    3 years ago

    Yep, the one above posted, but the one an hour ago with the b word didn't.

    amylou321 thanked Sherry
  • LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
    3 years ago

    tigereye - that boneless wing recipe looks so good. I'll have to give it a try sometime. I usually don't bread true buffalo wings and just cook on the grill and then baste with wing sauce a few times after they have cooked on both sides. I also season with Szeded's chicken rub before grilling.

    Sometimes if the weather doesn't allow for grilling I will use a knock off recipe for Hooter's wings that are breaded and also very good.

    Naturegirl - sometimes I can get boneless chicken breasts as low as $0.99/lb. here. They are obviously not the best quality. I don't think I've seen fresh wings for much under $2.99/lb. for a long time.

    amylou321 thanked LoneJack Zn 6a, KC
  • DawnInCal
    3 years ago

    pillog, I think I need one of those...no, I'm SURE that I need one!

    Maybe it's just me, but I think it's funny, in a sad sort of pathetic way, that the filters won't allow the B word.

    amylou321 thanked DawnInCal
  • Sherry
    3 years ago

    Your post in cooking with the B word will show up eventually. It is just held until the mods can read the post and who knows how long that will take. Yes, it is kinda sick. I guess we might overexcite some people if we mention b's. (Even if it is a chicken b.) They do have pretty big b's now!

    amylou321 thanked Sherry
  • maddie260
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Chi, I’m making that tapenade. But, using a blend of olives as I love kalamata! Thx for the recipe. I can’t imagine what cream cheese would add to the recipe?

    amylou321 thanked maddie260
  • Chi
    3 years ago

    Maddie, I don't think it needs it but I was considering it after Elmer and amylou's posts about olive tapenade and cream cheese.

    Let me know if you like it! It definitely improves with a little time. I love kalamata olives too.

    amylou321 thanked Chi
  • l pinkmountain
    3 years ago

    Coleslaw if I'm pressed, which is a bag of the shredded cabbage with Newman's Own Poppyseed dressing over it. I have gotten raves and requests for the recipe, which I say is a secret. Veggie cream cheese roll ups/pinwheels if I have to bring an appetizer. My mains vary, but I try to do something veggie, usually some kind of bean dish in the crockpot. Dessert is often pie, made with store bought crust and sometimes frozen fruit, my famous one is raspberry peach. Not something you see too often in the stores so evokes a home made vibe. Just call me Sandra Lee!

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  • chloebud
    3 years ago

    My mom would make a cream cheese/olive spread when we were kids. We'd have it on sandwiches and crackers. One of my favorites was spreading it on thin slices of deli meat and rolling it up. I still love that stuff...even if I just add the olives and chopped red onion to the cream cheese.


    pinkmountain, I'll have to try that Newman's Poppyseed Dressing. ;-)


    This is another coleslaw that I'm often asked to bring.


    Cole Slaw with Horseradish Dressing (Serves 6-8)

    1 small head cabbage (about 1 pound), shredded
    Optional: chopped green onion (about 1/2 cup)

    Dressing:
    3 T. white wine vinegar or cider vinegar
    2 T. sugar
    1/3 cup sour cream
    1/3 cup mayo
    2 T. prepared horseradish (or to taste)
    1 tsp. celery seed

    Pinch each of salt and pepper

    Mix vinegar with sugar until it dissolves. Mix in remaining ingredients and taste for seasoning. Toss with cabbage and green onion about 30 minutes before serving. Cover bowl and chill until ready to serve.

    amylou321 thanked chloebud
  • nancyofnc
    3 years ago

    I am another lover of potlucks. So many flavors and a variety of stuff I don't usually bake/make and some I've never heard of. Love it! Love it!

    My DIL has a family reunion (100th this year) that she has invited us to attend for the last 10 years that she and DS have been married. So sweet since they are the only family I have -- while she has 87 cousins and a passel of assorted other relatives. The revolving hostess arranges to have the main dish delivered - usually from an upscale restaurant, dinner service pieces, table flowers, etc. Everyone contributes to the cost that also covers the servers, cleaner-uppers, etc. $15 ea is a really inexpensive meal for the two of us! Almost everyone brings something homemade (or sometimes purchased), or a bottle of booze, or nibbles, or who tosses in a few extra dollars for the service. My DIL is a professional cake decorator (my son is the baker - like me) so she contributes a couple gorgeous cakes that are show stoppers. Not knowing what to bring the first time, I laid out a platter of my homegrown/homemade pickled okra, maybe 150 pieces. Not one tiny speck was left! So, now it is on the hostess's list asking me to bring it every year. I feel like such a part of a welcoming family. A simple thing that makes the difference to someone. So, if you are asked/expected to bring a certain dish, you may not know how much people look forward to it.

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  • loonlakelaborcamp
    3 years ago

    For hot weather potlucks I make a creamy, oniony potato salad. I have nesting bowls, so always have the potato salad in an ice lined bowl.

    For colder weather, i make a wild rice hot dish.

    Cook wild rice in chicken broth untill just slightly underdone.

    Add an additional equal amount of parboiled white rice cooked in broth.

    Add several cans of mushrooms with canning liquid.

    Add powdered garlic, onion to taste. Cover and bake for 1/2 hour. When nearly ready to go to the party, toss a cup or two of thawed peas on top, toss on some black pepper and 1/2 cup butter. Put foil on top and all the buttery goodness melts in.

    Just stir up to serve. Holds heat well.

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  • share_oh
    3 years ago

    Timely post as we have a church picnic/potluck this weekend! And no guidelines on what to bring. Ugh. My dh wants to make macaroni salad and I told him there could be 10 dishes of that - who knows? This is a new church for us so we don't know what to expect.

    Amylou have you shared your mac n cheese recipe before? I didn't see it here. All of your dishes sound delicious! I like to make mac n cheese at Thanksgiving for the "kids" (who are all adults now).

    amylou321 thanked share_oh
  • ldstarr
    3 years ago

    I often make a corned beef recipe that was my mother's. As you have to cook the corned beef and then let it cool, you have to plan ahead. After it is cold, slice it 1/4" thick and "re-assemble" it. You then make a glaze of brown sugar, prepared mustard and vinegar to spread over it. Then you just warm it in the oven until the glaze is sticky and meat warm throughout. People love it, warm, cool or cold and I never bring any home.

    amylou321 thanked ldstarr
  • OutsidePlaying
    3 years ago

    Since retiring I don’t have many potlucks to prepare for anymore. We do tailgate in the fall on occasion and have football get together where we all bring something to share. My specialty is pork tenderloin and carmelized onion sliders. I always bring some good mustards and they disappear quickly. I have also brought Texas caviar dip, a spinach/strawberry salad with homemade dressing, a broccoli salad (no mayo), a tart with carmelized onions, tomatoes and feta that is delish and gone quickly, and mini peppers stuffed with guacamole. For more substantial sides, my kids and grandkids love corn casserole and sautéed garlic green beans.

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  • amylou321
    Original Author
    3 years ago
    last modified: 3 years ago

    Share, I think I HAVE shared the mac and cheese recipe before on some other discussion. But here it is again.

    Please remember when you read this that i am a mere home cook, not a doctor or nutritionist. ;)

    1 pound elbow macaroni, cooked in salted water and drained

    1 stick butter

    some flour, maybe half a cup

    1 quart heavy cream

    18 slices american cheese (not the individually wrapped ones)

    6 cups shredded cheddar(4 for the sauce,2 for the top)

    Melt the butter and add and cook the flour for a few minutes, whisk in heavy cream and cook for a few minutes until it starts to thicken, melt in the american cheese then the 4 cups of shredded cheddar. Mix in noodles. Put in baking dish of your choice(i prefer my heavy pink stoneware) and top with remaining 2 cups of cheddar. Bake at 375 until bubbly and brown around the edges.

    This makes a LOT. A giant pan of it.

  • share_oh
    3 years ago

    Thanks Amy! I saved it for future reference!

    amylou321 thanked share_oh
  • bob_cville
    3 years ago

    Another recipe of mine that was in heavy rotation for summer potlucks a few years ago when I had a vegetable garden and a veritable plethora of cucumbers is a cold cucumber yogurt soup.

    amylou321 thanked bob_cville
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