Words I am tired of hearing.

amylou321

This is merely a rant. Words I am tired of:
Literally- this word is misused so often. And everyone uses it. It's the new "like."
Super- This word has been adopted as the new "very." Its so annoying. People are using it waaaaay too much. Has anyone else noticed this? I decided to count "supers" the other day and one episode of Chopped had 18 "supers." 18! Including an articulate critique from judge Chris Santos calling something "super super SOOOOOPER sweet." Gah!
And finally,(this is a little petty and nit picky) why is the word "woman" being replaced with "female" so often? Sure,it is technically correct. Women ARE female....I just feel like people who use the word "female" instead of "woman" are just trying to make themselves sound smarter than they are..... Maybe I am the only one this bothers. I just dont get it. It is almost as if "woman" is the new b word....... so weird.
Any to add?

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Chi

I hate the word "bestest." I don't hear it too often but it makes me cringe. It sounds like baby talk and not cute on anyone over the age of 3!

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

It’s just curse words I don’t like. Heard plenty this weekend with my husband working on home improvement :)

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justlinda

For me it's the word "so", as in when asked for a response to "What happened at the meeting?" and the person's response starts with "So, we went over the minutes from last meeting." This absolutely hurts my ears :(

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Bookwoman

'Gift' used as a verb.

Would you ever say "gifting" out loud? Would you ever, without a sense of irony or shame, ask someone the question, "What can I gift you for your birthday?" No, most likely, you would not. Not only because you are not (I am assuming) socially awkward, but also because, more to the point, you are not—or you would very much prefer not to be—a stooge of Madison Avenue. https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/12/gifting-is-not-a-verb/383676/

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littlebug zone 5 Missouri

For. As in, “I’m not for sure.” Ack!!

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wantoretire_did

Reach(ed) out. It has taken over “talked to”, “spoke with”, “called”, “left a message for...”

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hounds_x_two

Another vote for “gifted” as a verb! Bothers me almost as much as hearing “asterik” instead of asterisk!

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undertoad

Thank you, Bookwoman! I share your dislike of “to gift.” Nouns used as verbs make me wince. “I received an invite to the party.” Whatever happened to “invitation? “Stay tuned for the big reveal!” It’s “revelation,” people! Whew, I feel better.

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raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

^^^ Words with more than 2 syllables are too difficult for us now, it seems.

My pet peeve (or one of them, at least) is the use of adjectives in place of adverbs. I cringe every time I hear someone say something like "to eat healthy" instead of "healthily". It is everywhere.

I'm with Iris, I am so sick of hearing gutter talk everywhere.

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Bookwoman

There's a local Blue Cross ad with the tagline "Live fearless." Every time it comes on I add the -ly, out loud. Drives me crazy.

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dedtired

Wanttoretire, I could not agree more. The term “reach out” drives me crazy. Every time someone says it, I get a vision of the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. If you mean that you’ll be in touch, just say so.

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patriciae_gw

Utilize. A fancy Dan way of saying use. Why not say use?

I dislike gift as well. Pretentious like utilize.

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OutsidePlaying

Utilize always made me cringe. It was as if someone was trying to impress with a word.

Awesome is over-used.

I also cannot stand to hear gift or gifted as a verb and ‘literally’ used, or rather misused, so much.

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jemdandy

The Chevy ad that touts. "Real people, not actors". Does this imply that actors are not people? Whats more, after viewing that ad, it seems that all the players are actors.

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seagrass_gw

For me, I am sick of "thoughts and prayers". It has become such a generic platitude.

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susanwv

How about “sorry for your loss”,, Really irritates me, almost as much as thoughts and prayers !

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Karen Cantone

Have a nice day!

Drives me crazy!

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Janie

Blessed. I just feel it is waaaaaaay overused - and by people who do not feel truly religious when they use it, it rolls off most tongues too quickly for my taste and for situations that don't seem appropriate to me for feeling "blessed".

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liira55

Basically and like are two filler words I don’t like. Also, when people say axed instead of asked, drives me crazy.

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roy4me

Prolly instead of probably.

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matti5

When I say "thank you" and the reply is "no problem". What happened to "you're welcome"?

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PattiG(rose)

"Perfect!" Seems like everyone says this now.

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cherryfizz

"literally" I had been watching a family vlog on Youtube for a year and every second word out of both parent's mouths was the word "literally" I stopped watching because every time I heard the word it just grated on my last nerve haha


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joyfulguy

"He said that he'd come and I was like that'd be a big help", using "was" instead of "said" or an equivalent and the meaningless "like" that many frequently drop into the conversation.

ole joyful


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Lindsey_CA

Literally -- Grant Napear is the play-by-play announcer for the Sacramento Kings basketball team. One night many years ago my husband and I were watching the game on tv when Grant said, "Michael Jordan is literally on fire!" Interestingly enough, no one rushed forward with a fire extinguisher...

So, -- We love to watch the show Shark Tank on ABC. As has been mentioned, above, it seems no one can begin a response without starting with the word, "So," It is extremely irritating.

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DawnInCal

Another vote for "reach out." Ugh!

"Perfect" isnt far behind.

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watchmelol

Yummy and nom nom unless one is a preschooler. The word woke, feels for feeling and fam for family.

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ladypat1

It was like, so awesome blah blah blah

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Bluebell66

“Ask” used like this: ”I want to put out an ask....” That was a sentence from a monthly community publication we receive. Ugh.

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aok27502

I was going to mention "ask" as a noun. Ahhhhhh! I heard a radio analyst the other day talking about an international negotiation. Whatever it was that one party wanted, she said "that was a really big ask!"

There is one word that I can't write here because it's too political. But it wouldn't be dinner with the in-laws if it didn't get worked into at least one conversation. Give it a rest already!

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Michael

I can do this, it's in my wheelhouse.

Stop!

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Annie Deighnaugh

Like when y'know, like someone can't like say like anything without like using the word like, y'know?

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rob333 (zone 7a)

Annie: Totally (or in today's lingo, tots)

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rob333 (zone 7a)

ETA: I wrote this before reading the thread. I apologize


Perfect


But only from clerks at stores, and especially, food workers
(baristas or servers). I am happy to hear it from my boss, but when I
order a coffee without cream, how is that perfect? It's always so
condescending to me. What did I do so right that it's perfect? My words? Saying please? It was the right drink? I mean, c'mon!

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Uptown Gal

"go with" as in , "I am going to the movie, want to go with?" Go with? go with

what? "go with who?" Very common where I am living right now, it seems.

Wish they would finish the sentence. :)

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Annie Deighnaugh

One I never get but hear on judge judy is people who confuse lend and borrow...how does one get those mixed up? I 'borrowed' him some money...no you lent it to him.

The other one that's been grating lately for some reason is when people mix up fewer and less....fewer cars, less water...if you can count it, it's fewer.

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Michael

Oh yeah?

Used by my daughter's MIL every time you share something with her.

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daisychain01

Insufficient funds. So annoying.

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Annie Deighnaugh

I never mind "have a nice day"...I figure it's better than if they say something like "get run over by a truck".

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salonva

Literally is at the top of my list.

And the "so" at the beginning of the answer is annoying but more curious to me. I remember first noticing it between 5 and 10 years ago and it just seemed to creep into everyday usage. I notice it is more with younger (well, younger than me haha) person's saying. It's almost instead of yes, or well as a throwaway word at the beginning of an answer that require some thought.

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Annie Deighnaugh

We enjoy watching film noir and one thing that is noticeable is that no one ever? makes statements? that sound like questions? Valley girls hadn't been invented yet....

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Uptown Gal

Similar to Michael...."is that right?" when you are talking to someone and they

say that after everything you say. I have a neighbor like this and sometimes

feel like saying..."Nah, I'm lying to you..you certainly didn't believe that, did you?" ;)

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nickel_kg

Regarding "gifting" -- I don't know who Peter Ellis is, but I enjoy this quote attributed to him:

First they came for the verbs, and I said nothing because verbing
weirds language. Then they arrival for the nouns, and I speech nothing
because I no verbs.

My own pet peeve is the missing "to be" ... as in, "This needs done" vs "This needs to be done."

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socks

Have a nice day or have a good one is just a way of saying the conversation is over, bye-bye. I don’t have a problem with that. it’s just a casual way of winding up a discussion.

“My bad” is horrible.

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Annette Holbrook(z7a)

I’m tired of “gonna go ahead and”. I’ve been watching a lot of how-to videos and the hosts constantly say they are “gonna go ahead and” attach this, cut that, etc. ughhh.

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Raye Smith

"Impactfull" - this is not a word! I assume that those that use this term don't comprehend that something can have no impact, varying levels of impact or an impact.

I like "you are in my thoughts and prayers" because people in difficult situations come to my mind during the day and yes, I do pray for them right then and there. Isn't it comforting to think that there are people that care enough about you to do so?

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Annie Deighnaugh

Actually, Raye, impactful is a word according to Merriam-Webster, first used in 1939. It means having a forceful impact, leaving a mark or impression.

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ritaweeda

I'm probably guilty of a few of the above, so, whatever. (I especially use that one to annoy.) I do go berserk over the fact that food packaging is now covered with all the words they think people want to see such as "sustainable" (what does that really mean anyway?) "no gmo" and "gluten free". Since when have pickles ever had gluten in them in the first place??

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Chessie

Am completely with you on the "female" thing. To me, it is a very "dehumanizing" term, and I believe that is the intent of those that use it, when they are discussing women, vs. discussing animals.

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Chessie


seagrass_gw

"For me, I am sick of "thoughts and prayers". It has become such a generic platitude."


I've never had a problem with it. What I do have a problem with is the constant media slamming of the use of condolences. People ARE sorry. It is NORMAL to express condolences. Sheesh.


"Reach out". GOD yes, My sister is in the field of "human capital management", which in itself is an awful phrase - but she uses "reach out" ALL the time now, even to me - like "well, why don't you reach out to your co-workers"....ARGGGHHHH.

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whatsayyou18

"No worries" or "No problem" in place of "You're welcome".

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nycefarm

conversated, conversating.

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kadefol

I agree with all of the above, especially "literally". Was in line behind two young women and one of them said "...and when he showed up, I literally died."

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tigereye

Prayers going up. Where else are you sending them? H***?

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patriceny

There is one young teller at my bank. My parents drilled good manners into me, so I always say, "thank you" after completing even the simplest of transactions.

Every blessed time I say "thank you" to her, she replies "yep."

I avoid her line if at all possible, just because that insolent response makes me want to lose my good manners and yell at the little twit. I swear I'd take "no problem" as an improvement over YEP!

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Yayagal

The sentence "it's so fun" drives me nuts


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Uptown Gal

I have noticed that several object to "in my thoughts and prayers" and "sorry

for your loss". I don't quite understand this...what should one say when they

are trying to give you some comfort and let you know that they are sorry

you are in pain for a loss? Someone thinking about me, and/or saying a

prayer for my comfort does exactly that...gives me a bit of comfort. I have

used these words and sure didn't mean to offend anyone when I did. Thanks.

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raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

Nickel_kg, yes! "Needs gone" is one I despise and see all the time on the sale/free pages.

Also, two trends in "newscaster speech" as I think of it: "Speaking out" (anytime anyone says anything about anything, even in answer to a question) and referring to past events in the present tense: "a family goes to the park and finds a crocodile" (Really? how often do they do this?)

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Lucille

I also have used such words "in my thoughts and prayers". That they are used frequently by many does not rob them of true feeling. In situations where they are used there is often a devastating loss. Those are times to use words that convey support, not necessarily to find different, inventive ways to show that support.


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blfenton

I clicked "like" on every comment that dealt with the word "gifted". That's how much the use of the word bothers me.

I'm ok with the use of the phrase "thoughts and prayers" in certain situations - the death of a family member, friend, or pet or if one is having a tough time in their life. But there are situations where it has become meaningless, where there are solutions and no one is prepared to take action to prevent those situations from occurring.

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Uptown Gal

Thanks for replying.

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bob_cville

I am literally amazed that no one has yet mentioned the word "amazing", or more specifically "amaaaaaaaazzing", which, like, literally is the only adjective some people seem to know. So that the only way to they can express different degrees of amazingness is by stretching out the middle "a" differing amounts.

I also agree with Raee about adjectives steadily, consistently and progressively replacing adverbs, seemingly everywhere. It's as if adverbs are a critically endangered species inexorably inching towards extinction.

Additionally, I agree with some of the sentiments expressed here with respect to "thoughts and prayers", but mostly because of the phrase's frequent usage by obdurate elected officials who after yet another horrific mass shooting stand for a moment of silence, offer their "thoughts and prayers" and then sit back down on their fat butts and steadfastly refuse to even consider doing anything whatsoever. Except, of course, to continue to accept largess from the "More guns is the answer, to every possible question" lobby, for whom they continue to bow and scrape and step and fetch.

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undertoad

“Sorry for your loss” (and this is just my opinion) sounds offhand and insincere. Adding “I’m” would be better. Again, just my opinion.

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ritaweeda

I'm also wondering what else to say when someone has experienced the loss of a loved one besides "thoughts and prayers" or "sorry for your loss".

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Olychick

As far as "sorry for your loss" - it sounds so impersonal to me. When my husband died, it really bothered me that someone who knew us well would either say or write that. I know I should be grateful that they "reached out" (lol), but why couldn't they say something like, "I'm so sorry to learn that Kevin died" ? Sorry for your loss sounds like I misplaced my house keys. If you don't know the person who died, I still think you can personalize
the message to the loved one...."I was so very sorry to hear that your
father, brother, sister died....."

I know it's awkward for us to express our condolences, but we all have to do it and it would be nice to acknowledge the true loss, not use some platitude instead. Sounding like a Hallmark card instead of someone's personal thought seemed, I don't know, lazy or ??


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chisue

Most of the above are on my list, plus...

The interviewer who tells the audience that he *sat down with* someone. Who cares? I hope they weren't both standing on one leg or perched on those tall stools used for the class dunce.

The news desk anchor who thanks every reporter for *doing his job*, reporting a story!

The nonsense that every story is *Breaking News*.

The use of *that* when referring to a human being. (I'm a *who*, not a *that*.)

One of my DH's grammar school teachers broke her students of prefacing an oral report with a *Well...* by instructing the whole class to immediately denounce it. The speaker would have to stop and try again later.

(Very droll, daisychain01!)

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graywings123

The use of *that* when referring to a human being. (I'm a *who*, not a *that*.)


I am seeing that more and more lately.



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rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

ritaweeda, I sure hope that you aren't ever in charge of preparing meals for someone with celiac disease! Pickles or pickled foods of any kind can absolutely contain gluten. It's hidden in the type of vinegar used.


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FlamingO in AR

“Sorry for your loss” is so much nicer than “well, that’s the way it goes.” Yes, someone actually said that to me.

“..... and go!” I despise when someone is asking for suggestions and then says that at the end. Go where? Is it a race? LOL

Gifted as a verb is my biggest peeve.

The word basically is still overused. And the misuse of I and me, on scripted shows, makes us yell at the TV and we have to be careful to not correct people in real life because it’s such a habit.


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aok27502

"conversated, conversating"

Really??? Please, no. No.

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roxanna7

Yayagal, I agree with you! When did proper modifiers become obsolete? Not in my world, lol Reading this thread has been so MUCH fun. So there.

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rob333 (zone 7a)
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Raye Smith

Oly, where I'm from it's considered rude to say "so-and-so died", acceptable versions would be; gone to glory, passed, graduated. There are more but I'm tired and can't think of them.

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chisue

Raye -- "Summoned" is my favorite. This reminds me of disliking death notices that say the deceased 'lost his battle' with whatever. (Do you ever think what a wonderful world it would be if everyone was really as nice as their death notices would have you believe?)

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whatsayyou18

"The use of *that* when referring to a human being. (I'm a *who*, not a *that*.)"

Oh, yes! My son is a writer and I broke him of this early on.

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whatsayyou18

"Happy belated birthday". The greetings are belated not the birthday, "Belated birthday greetings".

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Elmer J Fudd

On the topic of regional differences, using "died" is the most common and I believe is perfectly acceptable where I am. What's not common or perfectly acceptable in my experience is to say that something is a "blessing" or any other direct reference to religion in mixed company. Religious beliefs are quite varied in my very heterogeneous area and also very much on the wane in popularity. Not frowned on but certainly not welcome to be emphasized in, as I said, mixed company.

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Jasdip

This isn't a 'hearing' but a 'seeing' irritant.

I'm seeing more and more pluralized words having an apostrophe. Even on signs outside of retail stores.

Open Sunday's for example. It doesn't matter the word, if it's pluralized, more people are putting an apostrophe on it. Drives me crazy!

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ritaweeda

I won't linger on this because I don't intend to hijack - rhizo_1 you are right, I googled it and some pickles are made with malt vinegars and that's where the gluten comes in. Something that I never knew since I've never seen a pickle recipe with malt vinegar.

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rob333 (zone 7a)

jasdip, I did that on a post title last week and I am still cringing that it got past me and is there in perpetuity. Ugh.

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Olychick

Raye, that is interesting, but very weird to me! I couldn't bring myself to say any of those euphemisms for death. I think I may have said before something like, "I lost my husband when we were both in our 40's" (sorry, I just HAD to put an apostrophy there), but then I realized I didn't really lose him, he died. So I think now I usually say, "My husband died early on in our marriage" - or something similar.

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amylou321

I have often seen people announce that so and so "went home" when they died. I let it go. It gives them comfort to say that.

"My thoughts and prayers are with you." This does not bother me. Sometimes it's all people know to say. It is not anybodys job to comfort me,and when it comes to a significant loss, no one can anyway.

"They are in a better place." Now THAT irritates me.

Now, "I'm gonna pray for you!"-That's a phrase that can go either way. Depending on the context, in the south that is very likely a dig at the person and NOT very Christian at all....heathens.

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graywings123

Re apostrophes: I don't understand why signmakers don't explain basic punctuation to people ordering signs.

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amylou321

The sign makers don't know any better either nowadays....

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Raye Smith

Amy, that's your choice to view people in a negative light and do you not see your post as stereo-typing?

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amylou321

Nope.

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Raye Smith

As an much older person the correct answer is -----"yes, how very thoughtless of me to stereotype kind people that offer to pray as heathens". I accept your apology.

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amylou321

I was raised in the south and know the social culture. I know the difference between a genuine "you're in my prayers" during a tough time and a "I am going to PRAY for you. You need it" during a disagreement.

So do you.

That's why I specified "depending on the context." So now the correct response would be to apologize for either selectively skimming my comment or being deliberately dense in order to argue with me. Seems to be a favorite pastime of yours.That's not very ladylike. I dont accept your apology. You should know better as a "much older person."


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FlamingO in AR

Another word I’m tired of. Triggered. Seems like everyone is happy to inform others that they were triggered by something. It’s like they’re proud of getting upset by some little thing we used to just shrug at and go on about the day. A hat, a sign, a word spoken. Geeze.

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salonva

Amylou posted-Now, "I'm gonna pray for you!"-That's a phrase that can go either way. Depending on the context, in the south that is very likely a dig at the person and NOT very Christian at all....heathens.

Chuckling with this exchange- as it reminds me , at least to my ears, of the "Bless her heart".

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littlebug zone 5 Missouri

I will never never forget my mother telling me that her sister “lost” her first baby. I was about 6 and had nightmares for years about the lost baby. Did they look for her? Is she crying in the woods? In the grocery store? In the backyard? I couldn’t understand how you could lose a baby . . . I was a meek and timid child and didn’t ask many questions, obviously.

I never use “lost” interchangeably with “died.”

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adellabedella_usa

I agree with many of the above.


The word 'educate' has become cliche within certain groups. I don't mind it so much from a teacher or educator. It bugs me when it comes from someone has basically just regurgitated a thought or idea and really has no experience in the area.

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kadefol

Ooh, I thought of another, "digest". As in, "it took him a while to digest being laid off".

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

Very interesting to read all these replies. Thank you! I am guilty of saying eat healthy instead of healthily. But I use steadily and not steady. Learning something here. I lost being religious in the traditional way more than 30 years ago, but I am not offended if somebody is going to pray for me or says bless you. At least not if I feel it’s meant in an honest way. Hey, I take all the help I can get at times.

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daisychain01

Has anyone mentioned, "couple three"? I think I've only heard this from sports announcers, but it drives me crazy.

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Raye Smith

Amy, in your post your state that except in rare occasions when a southerner says "I'll pray for you" that they are a heathen. (Your words, not mine.) And then proceed to accuse the one that points out that this is a fallacy of arguing is passive-aggressive. Why would a person be considered incorrect for saying they will pray for you only if they are from the south?

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amylou321

****Scooting to the edge of my seat to wait for that genteel apology****

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happy2b…gw

Another one is "according to the research". This phrase often stops discussion as it makes the speaker appear knowledgeable and more informed than others. As an educator, I always asked for the source. Rarely was it shared. People tend not to question research and swallow someone's opinion hook, line, and sinker.

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Raye Smith

Amy, give it up, when someone says they will pray for you, no matter the situation - that's exactly what they mean. Your choosing to conclude that they are insulting you, have bad motives or hate God is ALL in your head and only your head.

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arkansas girl

Amylou, "I will pray for you" can absolutely be used as a rude comment! Just like "bless her heart" can.

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amylou321

Yup. Or should I say, Amen,Arkansas girl!

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Lucille

"when someone says they will pray for you, no matter the situation - that's exactly what they mean. Your choosing to conclude that they are insulting you, have bad motives or hate God is ALL in your head and only your head."

A conclusion that the phrase may in fact be an insult is not only in Amylou's head. Below, the Urban Dictionary has several unflattering definitions for the phrase. (Of course, it can be said in a kind manner as well, but Amylou's post on the subject specified that the meaning depended on context.)

Urban Dictionary:

https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=I%27ll%20pray%20for%20you.

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jim_1 (Zone 9A)

I catch myself doing this...when someone says something to me, my mind/mouth stalls for a very short moment and then begins saying, "Well..."

Others begin with "So" and "I mean". Some of these sentence beginnings are heard and seen on television interview shows. I try to stop myself, but my mind and mouth cannot seem to get the idea of doing it the correct way.

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Raye Smith

If you assume that a kind "I'll pray for you" is rude than you're paranoid. If you truly think that someone is insulting you, why would you chose to converse or be friends with them? If they are trying to insult you, you don't have to take is that way, reply with "thanks, is there anything that I can pray about for you?".

Now, yes, bless your heart can have a multitude of meanings including "you are dumb as a stick".

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socks

“Influencer”


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arkansas girl

Raye, you are twisting and contorting what Amy has said to fit into what you are trying to say. Of course a person can be sincere when they say "I'll pray for you"...no one is saying that they can't be.

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arkansas girl

I hate it when I hear someone say "buh-in" instead of button and other words that are like that with the "tin" sound. The T somehow gets lost.

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Michele

The British often use the word “brilliant” for no reason whatsoever.

Have you heard “what happened?” as a response to saying someone’s name in an attempt to get their attention?

I usually forgive people for not knowing what to say when there’s a death. Honestly I barely remember what anyone said or wrote at the time.

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artemis_ma

I'm fine with "I'll pray for you". It's the intention, and all good.

I loathe "it was meant to be". Now THAT I'll spit needles at. AND yep, that saliva spit was, um, "meant to be". Direct consequence.

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artemis_ma

Not fond of:

"My bad". What the heck is that supposed to mean? Where did it come from?

"Spend" as a noun. As in "we have to track our spend". I thought it should be, "We have to track our spending". Too lazy for a second syllable?

"Plant-based" instead of when someone means "vegan". I'm sorry, if my meals are plant based, they are mostly veggies and can perhaps have some meat things that seriously fail to predominate the dish. Look up the dictionary meaning of a BASE. The ROOT and the BASE of the item is a vegetable, or several of them. BASE does not indicate an entire composition. The base of my house is concrete. I don't live in a concrete home.

Misuse of "literally". When you mean "figuratively".

Stop "gifting" me. Just give me whatever it is - or if you'd rather not, don't give it to me.

"Reaching out" . Just so HR-ish.

Not knowing the difference between "effect" and "affect".

I've decades ago lost the battle over "organic", as there's now a legal definition, and I now use the term myself regarding agriculture. But sophomore year of college, I took a course in Organic Chemistry, and there's absolutely little we worked with that anyone would have wanted to eat.




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bob_cville

> I hate it when I hear someone say "buh-in" instead of button and other
words that are like that with the "tin" sound. The T somehow gets lost.

One of the announcers of a recent new TV show named "The Titan Games" consistently does that, pronouncing the word as Tie-un. You would think that would be the first thing asked in the audition or interview for the announcer position. "Can you pronounce the name of the show?" "No?" "Next!"

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Chessie

Michele

The British often use the word “brilliant” for no reason whatsoever.


Huh? It means "great", or "fab". Anyone that is familiar with the lingo knows that. Certainly not "no reason".

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bob_cville

> "My bad". What the heck is that supposed to mean? Where did it come from?

I was thinking I should offer a "mea culpa", to acknowledge that I frequently use that phrase, usually when I'm playing on my volleyball team and I commit some error that causes us to lose a point. It's simply a quick, shorthand way of accepting or claiming blame for a misdeed. Then I realized that "mea culpa" means exactly that, so that may have something to do with the origin of the phrase.

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marylmi

There are several that drive me crazy but since I hear them on the KT quite often, I wont elaborate. :) I'm also really tired of the orange haired goofball saying how brilliant he is.

I'm just thankful I can work outside today and the sun is shining ! :)

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Chessie

Yeah I used to say the same thing about "my bad"....it annoyed the heck out of me. But I swear it has become so commonplace around me I don't even give it a second thought anymore. My boss uses it, my sis, even my MOM. LOL!

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stacey_mb

I'm probably one of the most diligent language enforcers ever and many of the examples given above make me cringe. However, I enjoy hearing and using some of them, mostly because they lend a lightness or slight humor to a conversation. Examples are "yummy" (I've used many times), "my bad," and "proly." I think of them as "throw-away" words that give personality and pleasant deviation to strictly correct usage.

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Michele

Chessie. Take it easy. I know how it’s used and what they mean. I don’t like it.

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raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio

Today is another example of my irritation with the increasing lack of correct grammar and confusion about the meanings of words in news media. I think perhaps they don't employ editors any longer, or the job of editor is now limited to vetting the opinions implied in the piece, which often seem to come through clearly even in supposedly objective, factual reporting....but that is another rant for another day.

From CBS news online: end of American assistance will only exasperate

I'm sure that some folks will be exasperated, but I think that isn't what the reporter meant.

I know that anyone can make such mistakes, I have and do (mispronounce things, also); but I grew up with the notion that major news outlets paid attention to such things.

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arkansas girl

What about the new trend to say "sick" when they mean it's great. So dumb sounding!

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artemis_ma

I hate it when I hear someone say "buh-in" instead of button and other
words that are like that with the "tin" sound. The T somehow gets lost.

I think I have never heard this usage. But then again, I haven't gotten into many conversations about buttons...

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rhizo_1 (North AL) zone 7

artemis, the word "organic" has more than one meaning. Clearly, organic chemistry has nothing to do with what most of us mean when we discuss organic gardening or organic foods. There is also "organic matter", yet another distinct usage of that pesky word.

Those who are irritated by the word probably don't have a firm grasp of any of the various meanings.

The terms "plant based" and "vegan" cannot be used interchangeably, either. There are lots of true vegan foods that wouldn't be considered plant based.

Stacy, I totally agree with you. Language is fluid, words are like music. I am very sensitive to different meanings and am apt to use a lesser used word in order to achieve the meaning I desire. I'm a bit surprised to read some of the words or phrases that are so irritating to some of you.


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Michele

My 18 year old and I have a laugh when I ask him to translate the latest slang. I’m glad he sees the humor. We’ve discussed slang from back in my day too. I didn’t use it much as I wasn’t very hip. ; )

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patriceny

The "sorry for your loss" and "thoughts and prayers" phrases have become so over-used that they are trite background noise to me now. Assuming the person's intentions are pure (not always a good assumption unfortunately!), then I don't find the phrases offensive so much as utterly pointless. It's verbal pablum.

I don't use either phrase. I try to come up with something more personal to the individual's circumstance and try to let it come from my heart.

We're talking about pet peeves here. I'm not sure trying to argue or rationalize away someone else's idiosyncrasies is a good use of time. It would be a rare person who isn't unreasonably annoyed by an occasionally stupid thing. :)

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arkansas girl

artemis, it doesn't have to be "buh-in" it can also be "cer-in" and "cur-ins" (certain and curtains) and as someone else said "Ti-ins" (Titans). Also, a bunch of other similar words where people are too lazy(?) to properly pronounce out the syllables.

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patriceny

Arkansas girl, I know what you are talking about. It's an affectation I think, rather like the Valley Girl speech from decades ago. I hear it mostly in younger people. But then again I'm getting old enough it seems like almost everyone is "younger people" to me.

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Chessie

arkansas girl - yep. I have heard this useage a zillion times. The one that we use (and laugh at) the most is "Oh no you di-ent!" LOL!!


https://media1.tenor.com/images/010d5d3933cce83dac99a701755159fe/tenor.gif?itemid=10953826


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blfenton

I hate it when I hear someone say "buh-in" instead of button and other
words that are like that with the "tin" sound. The T somehow gets lost.

It turns out that there are a whole pile of internet sites discussing this very topic. Apparently it's ok to pronounce button "buh-in" because of something called the glottal stop which has to do with the movement of our tongue.

Who knew?, I didn't.

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wantoretire_did

Why, when someone is accused of a heinous crime, he is referred to as the “gentleman”??

Prolly makes my hair hurt....

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anneliese32

Going back to the discussion about "I pray for you", here are two scenarios.

  1. Entrance to the hospital in the evening. I go in and a neighbor comes out. He asks me if I visit somebody. I tell him I don't but that I have surgery in the morning and have to check in now. He belongs to a group which visits often patients without family members and especially veterans. He says" I pray for you" and I thank him and know he means it.

  2. A discussion about a contested local election. Somebody says to me: " You vote for him, don't you?" I tell him: "No, I dont". He: "I pray for you!" Really?


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kadefol

Re. "buh-in" and such, I also dislike "pitcher" instead of picture, "aks" instead of ask, and some others I can't think of right now.

Oh, for another annoying word, "like". "It's, like, so hot out today, I am, like, sweating like crazy and it's, like, unbearable."

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Raye Smith

Anneliese, (pretty name by the way) on #2 never, ever heard that phrase used that way and I would assume that they were socially awkward or just plain weird.

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arkansas girl

I just thought of something I hear on youtube ALL.THE.TIME. A youtube beauty expert says "I'd like to hear you guys's opinion" with guys's pronounced "guyses". It's not guys's it's just guys'. I swear they all say this...sounds illiterate. Probably a better thing to say would be "I'd like to hear your opinions".

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phoggie

I can overlook grammar mistakes but never the “f” word!

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Rusty

Amen, Phoggie, AMEN! ! I really dislike cuss words, and that one in particular!

Many of the words and phrases mentioned in these posts are, I believe, colloquialisms, and as such, can lend expression and interest to speech, both spoken, and especially written.

" hate it when I hear someone say "buh-in" instead of button and other words that are like that with the "tin" sound. The T somehow gets lost"

Isn't that prevalent in the British accent? Maybe not, but somehow it always sounds British to me when I hear it.

I also dislike the overuse of the word 'like'. And 'must', as in 'must have', 'must read', etc.

Also shortening words, 'b4', 'ur', 'fav', 'fab', etc. And one that's been popping up more and more lately, 'vacay'. 'Cra-cra' comes across as pretentious, but dumb.

Rusty

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patriciae_gw

Extremely unique or any other qualifier for unique which is in itself all that is necessary.

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petalique

Good ones.

I am only part way through (“thru”) thread, but feel I need to make a correction. It’s not “perfect” (shortcut for perfectLY), but “Perfek”.

Not Asked, But Ask’d or axed. (YouTube search for “The Audubon Zoo” by The Meters)

Utililized — can be used, but in the context of when (for example) you use a tool for a purpose different from its intended purpose. For example, “Ralph utilized a Waterpik for a to clean an old sink at the lake cottage; and to his surprise, it worked perfectly at removing the decade’s old mineral deposits from the drain plug and faucet turns.”

You don’t “utilized” a mop to wash the floor.

I nominate the entire month of April to be Adverb Awareness Month. Bring your LYs and help prevent needless cringes and shattered eardrums.

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Chessie

Oh my. "Axed"? That drives me up a flippin' wall.

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Kathsgrdn

"No wonder vets commit suicide!" Screamed at me by a wife of a vet over the weekend. He ran out of his blood pressure meds the week before. She put a request in two weeks ago (so she says anyway) and decided not to call the pharmacy during business hours the week he ran out, instead waited for the weekend when the pharmacy was closed and screamed at me that phrase about 5 or 6 times.

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nickel_kg

Kathsgrdn, that is truly stress-inducing, not merely distasteful. I'd have a hard time not hanging up on a screamer -- I guess you had to dig deep and exercise patience. Wow.

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wantoretire_did

Perfek?

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Kathsgrdn

Nickel, we get those type of callers all the time. Not stressful but annoying, especially when you can't be nasty back to them...which sometimes you really want to do. I politely told her to have a nice day and hung up on her. She refused to take my advice on how to get her husband his medication that day so I ended the call when all she wanted to do was scream at someone.

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Fun2BHere

A funny story about using the euphemism of going home for the act of dying. Two friends, Tom and Bill, had fathers in the hospital. Tom called Bill to see how Bill's father is doing. Bill tells Tom that his father has gone home. Tom replies that his father has gone home, too. A few days later, Tom's mother received two sympathy cards for the loss of her husband. You see, Bill's father died, but Tom's father went home from the hospital after recovering from his ailment.

I'm not making this up. It just happened two weeks ago. I'm a friend of Tom's mother and she couldn't figure out why she was receiving sympathy cards. It took us a while to determine the source of the misinformation. Then, Tom had to call Bill and tell him about the misunderstanding and express his sympathy regarding the death of Bill's dad.

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Michael


Watch the video or slide to 2:12-2:14 to hear buh-in. I use these filters and remember hearing buh-in for the first time.



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Debby

I was going to leave my comment as my only comment, but from reading through these a bit this morning, I say "I'm sorry for your loss". What would you like me to say? Oh Good! He/She died! Now you don't have to put up with them anymore, just doesn't seem right. But what really offends me is when I hear, "they're in a better place now". My son is dust in a box in the ground. No. He is not in a better place. His better place was in the tv room watching his favourite movies with the family who loved him.

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whatsayyou18

Debby, I wonder if some find "I'm sorry for your loss" not so much offensive but lacking in originality; too easy. I try to avoid it and tailor my message to the recipient(s). but it can be difficult.

I really hate "...in a better place" and would never, ever say it. I do sometimes think that I'm glad the person is no longer suffering but I keep those thoughts to myself.

Having said all that, I truly am sorry for the loss of your son. That is something no parent should have to experience. (((hugs)))

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joanmn

Grow....I will grow my business. I always thought it was I want my business to grow.

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whatsayyou18

"self care".

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DawnInCal

I'm sorry for the loss of your son too, Debby. No one should experience that kind of pain.

I think that people often don't know what to say in those types of situations and often end up putting their foot in it, but for the most part they mean well and don't intend to cause additional pain.

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DawnInCal

Another one that bugs me is "I feel you." In my world, it's "I feel for you."

When I hear people say that, I'm often tempted to say "please dont feel me, you dont know me well enough."

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littlebug zone 5 Missouri

Open up. For example, “Kim kardashian opens up about her relationship with her husband.” I don’t care 2 cents about KK’s relationships and I really don’t want to think about her opening up. Ha!

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jemdandy

"You know" Drives me up the wall sometimes especially when its used as a pause filler, you know, the pause that occurs when a person stops to search for the right word or phrase, or simply does not know what to say, but uses it to retain conversation control. There are some people who scatters that phrase throughout everything they say in an unconsciousness manner. Some day, I'm going to shout, "NO, I don't know - You tell me".

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Michele

That reminds me of a very painful moment in my life. I was an extremely shy kid growing up. Total lack of any self confidence. I hated speaking up. For some reason I needed to discuss something with my sociology professor after class. After I finished speaking he asked me “Do you realize how many times you said ‘you know’?” It was really rough. My Dad was sick throughout my first years at college. I was a mess. (I probably still am).
Just makes me think maybe we should take it easy on each other.

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phyllis__mn

Something I haven't seen in this posting,and it may be just local, but using "like" instead of plan on or intend to. For instance, "I like to go on a trip next week." I also dislike shortening of words, such as "veggies" and "adorbs", the latter which seems to be used by teen age girls so easily!

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chisue

Jem -- My DH will join you in questioning the "You know" speaker. He already mutters, "No, I don't know. I thought that was why I was listening to you."

I think people use these 'place savers' when they are unsure they have your attention. The "Well..." as an introduction is a weak form of "Attention, please."

I know someone who will close a statement with..."on that" "or "and that's all on that". He's declared something, then adds this because...why? Can't he just *stop*?

*I* am trying to return to "Rats!" as an expression of annoyance. I've allowed ugly profanity to creep into my speech. I think that's because it's now so commonly heard, but I don't have to add to the ugliness.

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Chessie

"*I* am trying to return to "Rats!" as an expression of annoyance. I've allowed ugly profanity to creep into my speech. I think that's because it's now so commonly heard, but I don't have to add to the ugliness."


Man I am so with you there. The F-bombs seem to fly out of my mouth daily, hourly at work (LOL)...used to be that was a rare thing. "Rats" is a good one - but just isn't as application to all the situations. I have started trying to say "effed up" or "eff it"...but it doesn't always feel like it expresses my frustration accurately. :-) BF is much worse now too...both of us have a lot of room to improve.

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Louiseab Ibbotson

My husbands family uses sentences that are not grammatically correct. For example: the car needs washed.

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Jasdip

All of the buzz-words in online news sources. Yahoo, etc.

Hack, clap-back, etc, etc.; empowered (usually in conjunction with a very obese woman in a bikini, because she's clapping back at body-shamers)

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Elizabeth

Today I heard "prolly" used several times. I am assuming they meant "probably"? Are they just to lazy to say or type it correctly? Or do they think they sound hip or cool?

I also heard a major newscaster say "obvi" for "obvious". Is everyone pretending to be a teenager now?

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amylou321

I remembered more. Or rather, I was REMINDED of them. On my nights off i was watching QVCs Christmas in July. It was already annoying how the women kept on and on and on about the items. But the thing that set my teeth on edge was the fact that they referred to everything as a "piece." "This piece would make a lovely gift. This piece will be treasured for generations. Piece piece piece piece piece." Aaaaa! Why cant they say "this ornament" "this carousel " this tree" whatever. I HATE that. People do that for everything. Watch HGTV and see how many times a couch is referred to as a "piece." A PIECE OF WHAT???? And speaking of HGTV, what's with everyone calling rooms or yards or garages "spaces???" It a room. Or a yard. Or a garage. Buzzwords. So irritating.

Oh,.and the QVC ladies used "gift" as a verb no less than 83000 times in the 20 minutes or so i watched. I get it now. It really is obnoxious.

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Elizabeth

How about folks using "ground" when they mean "floor"? They are referring to something or someone that fell, indoors. Very common anymore.

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aok27502

I just thought of another one: experience. Everything is an experience. No, the Grand Canyon is an experience. Watch a space shuttle launch is an experience. The grocery store, the bank and the dry cleaners are errands.

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fran1523

"Nothing burger"

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arkansas girl

How about "ex-specially" for the word especially. I hear that all the time.

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The Polite House The Polite House: What Can I Do About My Neighbors’ Trash Cans?
If you’re tired of staring at unsightly garbage way before pickup day, it’s time to have some tough conversations
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Life Three More Magic Words to Help the Housekeeping Get Done
As a follow-up to "How about now?" these three words can help you check more chores off your list
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Housekeeping Three Magic Words for a Clean Home and a Better Life
Not a natural tidying and organizing whiz? Take hope in one short phrase that can change your life forever
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Gardening Guides 6 Reasons I’m Not Looking Forward to Spring
Not kicking up your heels anticipating rushes of spring color and garden catalogs? You’re not alone
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Budgeting Your Project The 4 Potentially Most Expensive Words in Remodeling
‘While you’re at it’ often results in change orders that quickly add up
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Contemporary Homes Houzz Tour: Modern Renewal for a Tired Texas Ranch
This major makeover involved additions, layout changes and a new facade. See the stunning results here
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Most Popular What I Learned From My Master Bathroom Renovation
Houzz writer Becky Harris lived through her own remodel recently. She shares what it was like and gives her top tips
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