Is it OK to post a recipe from a magazine as long as I identify where

nancyjane_gardener

Where I got it?

I just made a lovely slaw with growing now ingredients.

I don't know if copyrights exist or what.

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Feathers11

Yes, it's OK for many reasons but mostly because you won't profit from it and am not claiming it as your own. Most sources would appreciate the exposure you'd give them. Please share!

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annie1992

A list of ingredients cannot be copyrighted, but an explanation or set of directions can be protected as "literary expression" or creative work. The real issue is when a recipe is plagarized, or passed off as an original work of one's own, without credit given to the original creator.

So, yes, you certainly can post a recipe here that came from a magazine or cookbook, but it's right to give credit where credit is due.

And yes, I'd also like that recipe, please!

Annie

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foodonastump

If it’s not ok many of us are in big, big trouble!

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plllog

Non-lawyer answer: You can't copyright an idea, though it's proper to give credit. You can only copyright the words. If you write it in your own words it's not a copyright violation. These things are becoming much looser in the internet age since it all gets out and there's no stopping it. Feathers has a good point--even if you posted it verbatim, making it a technical violation of copyright, the magazine would have to prove damages for them to win anything from you in court. In no one's wildest dreams would Houzz make enough on advertising from having people see that recipe for them to be functionally liable for damages either. If the magazine minded, they'd tell Houzz and have it removed and that would be the end of it. A few bytes deleted.

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Sooz

I *think* over at chowhound, they stress paraphrasing a recipe in order to avoid the potential of copyright infringement or plagiarism.

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foodonastump

But we’ve not been asked to. Going on what, two decades now? Can’t be too big of a concern.

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cloudy_christine

If the recipe is in the online version of the magazine, post it with a link. Then the magazine will be fine with it for sure. But if it's not online, I agree that you can just give credit and not worry about it

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Not necessarily a problem 99% of the time if a link or mention is provided. It is the use a photo or recipe that is not credited to the original creator that is frowned upon. On-line magazines and food bloggers welcome a provided link as that is how they create income by traffic hits.

What I like to do and see from others is to post your own pic of the recipe, then post the recipe link. I rarely use recipes but am often inspired by searches. So I'll link a similar recipe.

I made a slaw last night to go with TacoNight as well as some sauerkraut fermenting for next weekend. No recipe for the slaw as I make it so often and use what veg I have on hand.

If I posted about fermenting kraut I would share this link, HERE

If my pup did not counter surf with my back turned, (jerky), and take the second half of my Napa Cabbage to our bed for a snack, (grrr), I would have made Emergency Kimchi from Maangchi, HERE

Google explains copyright HERE


If I was posting about fermentation I might provide a link to my new air-locks but I like to use a product a while before recommending.

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artemis_ma

Writing my own food blog.... sometimes I re-create other recipes seen online or in a cookbook.

List of ingredients is fine to repeat.

I totally re-write the instructions and I make sure any commentary or photos are my own.

I always, ALWAYS credit my source. IF an online source, with a link back.


PS: If I make changes in the recipe, I note that, for instance, I can't eat tree nuts so I used peanuts instead... blame me if the recipe doesn't work for you, instead of my source...


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annie1992

Like artemis, I see many people will still credit the origin, saying "adapted from" or "inspired by", especially in today's blog filled internet age. I've seen posters here for decades doing that too.

Annie

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nancyjane_gardener

Well, it didn't taste as good as I was hoping, so the question is moot.

I know for the future, though.

If you're really wondering, it was a snowpea/radish slaw from Healthy Eating.

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nancyjane_gardener

Actually, it was way better day 2!


1/2 c cider vinegar

2 tblsp mayo

1 tbsp sugar (I used less)

1 tsp yellow mustard

1/4 tsp celery seed

3/4 tsp salt (I use less)

1/2 tsp r pepper

4 c sugar snap peas, julianned

1 c radishes, julianned


Whisk 1st 7 ingredients together in large bowl, mix in snow peas and radishes, let sit at least 30 minutes.

I found it much better the next day!

From Eating Well


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Compumom11

DH loves coleslaw and snap peas. Going to give this one a whirl!

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plllog

Isn't that the way so often? Things are better the second day? Thanks for the recipe. :)

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annie1992

I also think that some things are better the next day, it gives the flavors time to "meld". I do have the latest issue of Eating Well and haven't read it yet, I guess it's time to sit down and pick it up!

Annie

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

We are about to see early spring peas in our markets. Google image pea and radish slaw and a hundred+ recipes come up. Anything fresh can be included. A 1/4 apple instead of any white sugars. (use natural sugar fruits). What looks good in your market?. Matchstick golden beet, celery, red onion, shallot, even frozen peas thawed.

Cabbage is so cheap year round since it has a long shelf life. (except Napa loose leaf)...red or regular last for a couple months even cutting off a 1/4 of it. Just add a finely sliced cup or two to any slaw. Break up those cell walls by cutting thin. Squish it with your hands. Why it is so good the next day or two.? Softens a bit and absorbs the acidic dressing. Basically making a quick pickle.

And,... it is salad!. Fresh whole food. Crazy so many love slaw but hate salads. So, your salad haters that love slaw....make - more - slaw. (just don't call it salad!)

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bragu_DSM 5

slawlad

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l pinkmountain

I often add chopped snow peas and radishes to slaw, but along with cabbage. Even regular ol' peas. We eat SO much "slaw" because cabbage is more cost-effective and sustainable for us, but my definition of cabbage salad is quite broad.

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Sherry

Yes, the original bloggers ask that you do not copy their directions, pictures, and recipe vebatim. I will usually just post the title and a link to the recipe. If I make any changes, I will say in the original post.

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annie1992

sleevendog, I don't hate SALAD, I hate iceberg lettuce. I'll eat raw spinach, baby greens, spring mix, even sometimes romaine, but I just do NOT like iceberg. However, if you go to a restaurant or someone's home, that's what you're going to get 95% or more of the time, a big plate of iceberg. Maybe some out of season cherry tomatoes. Ugh. And, if it comes already dressed, like Olive Garden's, that lettuce is going to be a soggy mess within minutes.

I eat Waldorf salad and various slaws and Kathy/Mustangs' lovely fig and raspberry salad with proscuitto/parmesan/fresh spinach. I'll even eat that "layered" salad, there's enough in there to hide the iceberg. Just don't give me anything mushy or that "wedge" salad which is just a wedge of iceberg with a drizzle of dressing. That actually hits two of my dislikes, I shouldn't need a knife and fork to eat a salad, it should already be in edible sized pieces so I can eat it with just that salad fork.

Annie

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plllog

I have to admit, I love iceberg, but it grows here. It's lovely, crunchy water. :) I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the concept of mushy iceberg, but I'm sure I'd hate that too. Much as I love it, though, it's not my idea of great salad. Better than romaine, but great salad needs dark greens, not crunchy water. Hand torn iceberg can make the base of a pretty good salad, however, and there's nothing better on a burger. :)

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