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jasdip1

I'm sorry you're so hurt.

Jasdip
5 years ago
last modified: 5 years ago

Annie has said that she isn't going to post for a while, because she's so upset. I hope others aren't going to do the same.

The media is so far to the left, here in Canada as well, and it was nothing but Trump-bashing, and praising Hilary, that we couldn't find anything non-biased at all. It's nauseating listening to the news and their guests spin everything in one direction.

Everyone, the polls etc said he wouldn't win. He did. They say he'll ruin the country.....who knows?

I was thoroughly disgusted when one supposed expert said that it would be 'voters with only a high-school diploma' voting for Trump. I find that extremely insulting. Many many people with 'only' a high-school diploma are successful. It's comments like that who made voters mad, I'm sure. And this was on our national news program, so those in the U.S. would have heard this much more often.

Personally I'm glad the vote went the way it did.

For those that are upset, we're still the same people, the same online friends, we still have each other, the sun still rose this morning, and there are things to do with our day.

Oh, I hope we get a wall built between the U.S. and Canada to keep the likes of Rosie O'Donnell, Whoopie and Miley Cyrus out of our country. You can still keep Justin Bieber!

Comments (122)

  • mamapinky0
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    My 20 year old daughter battles a very rare, chronic, life threatening condition..she's classified as disabled..*Get over it* not gonna happen.

    Exactly how do I get over it.

  • Annegriet
    5 years ago

    I will never get over this. Dissent is patriotic. If you live anywhere on the Eastern Seaboard, please go to the Million Woman March. You can accept Donald Trump as your President but you can also hold him accountable for his words--he works for ALL the American people now.

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  • llucy
    5 years ago

    For those who blithely tell protesters to "Get over it"...


    What do you think is going to happen if Trump/Pence/ the GOP actually try to implement policies based on their campaign rhetoric? Tens of millions of people are not going to silently take it. Get over it? No, more likely you will have to "Get used to it."

  • lily316
    5 years ago

    More people voted for Hillary by a million votes, so NO , the Sociopath doesn't have a mandate

  • golfergrrl
    5 years ago

    Trump will be the next president. There's no way to stop him. Politicians will say anything to garnish votes. We can only hope that he tempers his views.

  • justlinda
    5 years ago

    There was a political cartoon in one of our papers showing Trudeau & Trump...here it is:


    Canadians should be worried that Trudeau may sell British Columbia to Trump so the State of Alaska would then be connected, geographically, to the rest of the USA - a corridor, if you will.


    As a Canadian from B.C. I certainly hope not...but just sayin'.


  • magic_arizona
    5 years ago

    No Lily, not a million votes. Less than 400,000.00.


    A little perspective and explanation on the Electoral College.


    http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2016/11/hillary_wins_the_popular_vote__not_.html

  • blfenton
    5 years ago

    Vancouver is already protesting in front of the still unopened Trump tower.

    So don't think that is going to be happening any time soon.

    I don't think Trump will be coming to Canada any time soon, if ever.

  • lily316
    5 years ago

    They are not done counting votes. Anyway you look at it, more people voted for her than the Sociopath.

  • Annegriet
    5 years ago

    The number of votes no longer matters. Donald Trump won. I'd say fair and square (with our electoral system) but there is that pesky interference by Comey. I think he was going to win even without that interference. The Democratic Party lost touch with the working people. Bernie was our best choice and well, I think he got screwed. Bernie has said it over and over that people want a radical change. Do I like Trump? NO!!!! Did I vote for Trump? Absolutely not. But he is the president. The protests should not focus on "not my president". I think it should take the form of what Bill Maher said last night--52% are NOT going away. We have things we must protect. That is what the protest is about--protecting all of our civil liberties.

  • 66and76
    5 years ago

    The following article clearly states the reasons Hillary Clinton was not elected.

    How Democrats defeated Hillary by Mark Thiessen, New York Post, November 12, 2016

    Donald Trump pulled off a stunning upset victory over Hillary Clinton
    on Tuesday night, rallying what he called the “forgotten men and women
    of our country” to win states such as Pennsylvania and Michigan that had
    not voted for a Republican presidential candidate since 1988.

    But Democrats had a simpler answer for why Clinton lost. As one
    Democratic strategist close to Clinton told The Post, it all came down
    to “one word: Comey.” Too bad for Democrats there are zero electoral
    votes in the State of Denial. FBI Director James Comey didn’t use a
    private e-mail server to conduct official State Department business and
    put 110 classified e-mails on that unsecured server. Comey didn’t fail
    to turn over some 14,900 e-mails to the FBI after assuring Americans
    that “I turned over everything I was obligated to turn over.”

    Comey didn’t lie to the American people about Benghazi, publicly
    blaming the attacks on “inflammatory material posted on the Internet.”
    Comey didn’t tell Democratic voters he was against free-trade deals, but
    then tell Brazilian bankers that his dream was for “hemispheric . . .
    open trade and open borders.”

    Comey didn’t have a foundation that accepted millions of dollars in
    donations from foreign governments during his tenure as secretary of
    state. He didn’t give, as I wrote last month, “special treatment to
    Clinton Foundation donors after the Haiti quake, asking for them to be
    identified as ‘FOBs’ (friends of Bill Clinton) or ‘WJC VIPs’ (William
    Jefferson Clinton VIPs).”

    Why did Hillary Clinton lose? Not because of Comey. She lost because
    exit polls showed that 54 percent of voters believe she is “corrupt.”

    To the elites in Washington, her corruption was apparently no big
    deal, at least not compared with their horror at the prospect of a Trump
    presidency. But Americans correctly saw her corruption as corrosive to
    our democracy.

    This election was a popular repudiation of Clinton’s corruption and
    deceit — and she owns that. But there is one person besides herself whom
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    Donald Trump, it was Obama who created him.

    Three days after his inauguration, when Obama met with congressional leaders to discuss his proposed economic stimulus.

    Republican leaders gave him a list of modest proposals for the bill.
    Obama dismissed them, telling the assembled Republicans that “elections
    have consequences” and “I won.” Backed by the largest congressional
    majorities in decades, he proceeded to push the largest spending bill in
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    He later did the same with ObamaCare — ramming it though over the
    objections of the American people and every single Republican in
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    could keep their doctors and their health plans.

    This helped produce the Tea Party revolt that put the House in GOP hands in 2010.

    Then in 2014, Republicans took control of the Senate.

    But losing his congressional majorities didn’t chasten Obama.
    Instead, he doubled down, declaring he would use his “pen and a phone”
    to impose his agenda through a raft of executive orders.

    When Obama couldn’t pass his Dream Act to provide amnesty for some
    not here legally, he tried to impose it on the American people though
    unlawful executive action — only to have it overturned by the Supreme
    Court.

    He reached a horrible nuclear deal with Iran and refused to send it to Congress for a straight up-or-down vote.

    He also showed contempt for Americans who disagreed with him —
    dismissing them as “bitter” people who “cling to guns or religion or
    antipathy toward people who aren’t like them.” Clinton echoed Obama’s
    contempt, dismissing half of Trump supporters as a “basket of
    deplorables.”

    This contempt, combined with Obama’s imperious efforts to force
    big-government liberalism on an unwilling nation, created a backlash in
    the form of Donald J. Trump. Trump ran against Obama’s signature polices
    — promising to repeal ObamaCare and scrap the Iran deal.

    In other words, Trump tapped into dissatisfaction with Obama on both the right and the left.

    He championed the forgotten Americans whom Obama and Clinton dismissed. They responded by electing him decisively.

    Sorry, Democrats, you can’t blame that on James Comey.

    Special to the Washington Post.

  • murraysmom Zone 6a OH
    5 years ago

    You still just don't get it. Yes, Trump won the election. What we object to is the person he is and how he incites others to violence and intimidation. I don't consider that to be "leadership quality" and will continue to protest and hopefully stop the intimidation and harassment of the people Trump denigrated during his campaign.

  • sjerin
    5 years ago

    To those who are telling us to chill and get over it, do you admire Trump? Do you have no problem with all he has said and done? I'd really like to know.

  • marilyn_c
    5 years ago

    I have more problems with what Hillary has said and done.

  • Annegriet
    5 years ago

    I am with Murraysmom--we are upset at his hateful rhetoric and how it has emboldened hate groups. I will continue to call Trump on his hateful rhetoric utilizing all of the constitutional venues including legal peaceful protest. I've already donated money, I'm attending the Women's March on Washington, and I will knock on doors for Democratic candidates in 2018. Trump--his tuchus works for us now! We must hold him accountable.

    PS--any working person voting for Trump is like the chicken voting for the Colonel. I don't get it.

  • Chi
    5 years ago

    I just read about a young Saudi college student who was murdered in Wisconsin. I really hope it wasn't a hate crime.



  • 66and76
    5 years ago

    The most "hateful rhetoric" came from Hillary Clinton during the Benghazi Congressional Hearing:

    TRANSCRIPT:

    SENATOR JOHNSON: Again,
    again we were mislead that there were supposedly protests and something
    then sprang out of that, an assault sprang out of that, and that was
    easily ascertained that that was not the fact, and the American people
    could've known that within days and they didn't know that.

    HILLARY CLINTON: With
    all due respect, the fact is we had 4 dead Americans. Was it because of
    a protest or was it because of guys out for a walk one night who
    decided they'd go kill some Americans? What difference at this point
    does it make? It is our job to figure out what happened and do
    everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again Senator.


    She lied. She was Secretary of State. She was sworn into office under oath to protect and defend the foreign embassies around the world. Under questioning by Congress, her emails to her daughter Chelsea on the night of the attack revealed that she KNEW the Benghazi compound was under attack by terrorists. She did not know how long the attack would last, but she did not send help. Americans DIED. Isn't it appropriate to hold HER accountable for her lies and her failures as Secretary of State?

    Bottom line: We don't know what Trump will do as the next president, but we do know what Hillary Clinton DID while she was in office. And, this is only ONE example of her incompetence; there are many others.

    *The only violent, law breaking "hate groups" in the news are the anti-Trump protesters. They should either lead peaceful protests (which is their right), or they should be arrested for criminal behavior. They have the right to vote again in 2020.

  • Texas_Gem
    5 years ago

    Annegriet- may I ask you a serious question?

    I noticed you said you would knock on doors for Democratic candidates in 2018. Do you simply encourage people to vote or do you hand out one sided information to persuade others to go out and vote for your candidate?


    I ask because I have always encouraged others to be informed and exercise their civic duty by voting but I feel it is wrong to engage an uninformed voter with clearly biased, one side information. I feel we should encourage ALL people to vote by presenting factual information, not Republican or Democrat spin. Let people decide on their own, don't attempt to sway with biased information.

    I've only ever known one other "door knocker" and she made no attempt at concealing her bias. She didn't encourage people to vote, she just sought out people to vote for her candidate.


  • Elmer J Fudd
    5 years ago

    Until the Democrat and Repub politicians and leaders start recognizing how damaging their no compromise, polarized (and polarizing) rhetoric is, knee jerk reactions and overreactions are to be expected. There's no toleration of the other side or alternate views these days. Just as the Republicans screamed like squealing pigs about their "no toleration" of Obama and his views for the last 8 years, now power has shifted and it's the other side's turn to do the same thing. It's a shame.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Messages of "please vote", whether from a knock at the door, someone out in public, a phone call or a mail piece, are rarely nonpartisan. They're usually organized by a political party or candidate or supporters of something on the ballot. And why not?


    TG, I don't think voting is a civic duty. That's the phrase but I don't think that's really what it is. As in most democracies, we have the right to vote. We also have the right to not vote. Both are characteristics of free societies.


    (Freedom of religion works the same way, of course. Again, like in most democracies, not only are we free to choose, we're free to not choose or to choose "None".)

  • Annegriet
    5 years ago

    Hi Texas-Gem.

    I only knocked on the doors of registered democrats.

    It's a little different each time you do it based on how far away we are from the election. In the beginning it was almost like a voter registration drive. "I see you didn't vote in the last election. It's really important that we get out there this time."

    Right before the election, I asked if they were voting and if they knew where their polling place was located. I tossed out the Hillary script--I didn't like it. If they said they were voting and they said yes, I then asked if they had made up their mind about who they were voting for. If they said Trump, I was super polite and said "I'm so glad you are voting. As you can see from my button, I'm a Hillary girl. If you don't mind, I'd sincerely like to know what made you turn the corner for Trump since you are a registered democrat."

    If a person was undecided, then I just said I hope you will consider Hillary. Here is a pamphlet with some info."

    Some people were very polite and said they wanted a change. Others were rude and screamed they hated Hillary. Some people were emphatic that Trump was a loony tune and had to be stopped. One woman pretty much called me a baby killer. The responses were all over the place. Lots of people thanked me for caring about our democracy. It was a strange experience but I will do it again. I do think it made a small difference.

  • Annegriet
    5 years ago

    Paula--dissent and protest is very American. How do you think we became a nation? Don't get me wrong--I think we must preserve the integrity of our nation BUT these protests are really more about the electoral college--Trump did not win the popular vote. What people are really saying in these protests is that "We are still here. We are not going anywhere." And if you try to take away Planned Parenthood, or the National Endowment of Arts, or raise the minimum social security age to 67, or get rid of the head of household tax filer status, or overturn Roe vs Wade or get rid of gay marriage--we are going to be vocal. By the way, has our President Elect rejected the KKK victory parade yet?

  • Chi
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I thought this was lovely, both as a political reflection and a tribute to Leonard Cohen. For those who don't know, this is the actress who plays Hillary Clinton on SNL.

  • Alisande
    5 years ago

    Those marvelous lyrics have layers of meaning right now. Yes, lovely performance. I had no idea she sang and played. And so well.

  • nickel_kg
    5 years ago

    Chi, that was beautiful.


  • lily316
    5 years ago

    I cried when I saw this last night. Two million more people voted for her than the sexual predator. My friends in Europe are as horrified as MORE than half this country is.

  • 66and76
    5 years ago

    Annegriet, As I have stated, nonviolent protest is a right of all Americans; however, wanton destruction of public and private property, brutal assault of human beings, and intimidation are not "rights". If there is a large enough voice expressed through legal representation in Congress, the citizens of this country can act to amend the Constitution to change or to eliminate the electoral college system.

    We are a nation of laws. So, I commend your continued (hopefully nonviolent) effort to get out the vote for the representation you desire. Please keep in mind that the things you are concerned about losing were once (and may still be) bitterly opposed by others. They will also continue to push for 'change THEY can believe in'.

  • lily316
    5 years ago

    Anne, I canvassed like you for Obama twice, Gore, Kerry, before but although I worked the phones, I didn't go door to door because I didn't want to be screamed at. We ,like you, had a list of Dems, and I even got a few nasty ones last time. I was too afraid of my life this time.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    "Paula--dissent and protest is very American. How do you think we became a nation?"

    Free speech and dissent are common in all but the most restrictive totalitarian countries, and it even appears sometimes in such places.

    Lily, I understand your feelings, but the popular vote means nothing. It's not what decides the race, you know that. It's not something to dwell on. If you have Democratic party leanings and want to feel sad, give some thought to the many mistakes made by the Dems, including the choice of candidate, and what lessons the party can learn for the future. The Clinton campaign took major parts of the country and individual demographics for granted and they were repaid by losing those votes. You saw the results, she did poorly with core Democratic support areas that Obama carried in the past.

    My own personal view is that she tried to build a brick wall between "old Hillary" and "new Hillary" and suggest that it was "new Hillary" who was running for office. The problem that came up was the whole email saga, no matter who's right, who's wrong, it was okay or not okay. This brouhaha served as a reminder that old Hillary and new Hillary are one in the same. She is a person with flaws and a track record that had a polarizing effect on the public. That's what opened the door for Trump in my view.

  • Texas_Gem
    5 years ago

    Lily- where are you getting your numbers? Didn't you say a day or two ago that Hillary had a million more votes, now you are saying 2 million.

    CNN and Google both are showing around 630,000, Politico is showing about 400,000.

    What is your source for the two million?

  • sjerin
    5 years ago

    Huh, I did not get any answers to my questions. I cannot wrap my head around support for such an openly offensive man. I know what you all think of Hillary, but I have not heard any defense of Trump.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    5 years ago

    She's openly offensive too and turns many off. Pick your poison. The purpose of a campaign is to win election, not to make intellectual inroads or achieve societal milestones. He was much smarter about that than she was. I think it's nothing more than that.

  • anne_ct
    5 years ago

    I'm curious, too, Gem. The latest figures I could find are represented in percentages...Clinton = 47.79% with Trump = 47.3%. More recent is this morning's Meet The Press, Chuck Todd using a round figure of a 600,000 Clinton popular vote lead over Trump. I think, perhaps, Lily is using the overall total popular vote total without looking at the individual candidate representative numbers.

  • 66and76
    5 years ago

    Elmer, As I have stated, nonviolent protest is a right of all Americans;
    however, wanton destruction of public and private property, brutal
    assault of human beings, and intimidation are not "rights". Democrats are disappointed their candidate did not win. They can try again in 2020. In the meantime, it would be helpful if they worked for change WITHIN the LAW, without rioters paid by George Soros. Hillary Clinton's corruption was exposed, and voters rejected her.

  • golfergrrl
    5 years ago

    The bottom line is that the vote count doesn't mean jack. The protesting can not change the fact that Trump will be our next president. You really think he would step aside? Gonna be interesting.

  • gregbradley
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I wouldn't have voted for Trump if the Democrats had nominated an acceptable candidate. Once Hillary was nominated I started saying "I'm voting for anyone else" then Trump pushed that almost to the breaking point. Perhaps we need to have a new party made up to include candidates that aren't the extreme left or extreme right.

    There isn't much to defend in Trump as he is offensive. He is just LESS offensive than Hillary. I think Bill Clinton did a pretty decent job but now it seems both Clintons have shown there true inner selves. Want to see a good former President, look at Jimmy Carter.

  • murraysmom Zone 6a OH
    5 years ago

    Pinkpaula, you are painting with a rather broad brush about the protesters. There have been many peaceful protests this past week. Yes, there has been some violence, but do we know with certainty that they were Hillary's supporters behind the violence? I don't think so. As soon as there is violence, you and the media are quick to hop on it, but we never get a true answer as to who is being violent. I don't agree with the violence. Anyone causing destruction should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. But the rest of us have the right and moral responsiblity to protest in peace.

  • chisue
    5 years ago

    Could we please have some reasons, some facts about why you say the Clintons 'have shown there true inner selves'. What do you mean? Specifics, please?

  • blfenton
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Trump is less offensive than Hillary?

    Hillary has worked her entire adult life on behalf of children and women. Trump has worked his entire life on behalf of himself.

  • eld6161
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Hillary was a career politician and so yes that is what they do, have platforms. Trump was a businessman who never had this on his radar. Until, he did.

    The biggest shock to me was that first debate where the stage was filled with Republican hopefuls, and one by one they all dropped off by the wayside, and we were left with Trump!

    Yes, it is unfortunate that Trump comes with baggage, but ,we have to look far and wide to find someone who doesn't. One scandal after another in Washington! Honestly, you couldn't make some of this up even if you wanted to!

    Our choices were dreadful. But, it is what it is. I am cautiously optimistic that Trump will create some positive changes. The changes that the majority voted him in for.

    It is up to Obama to step up and not condone the violent protesters.

    There is already talk of the Democrats regrouping. They four years to get it right this time.

    I am hopeful that the media will learn it's lesson and report honestly and correctly. The way they presented, it was Hillary all the way! AOL gave daily statistics that had Hillary at 98 percent! The only correct statistic they presented was when Trump won!

    Hillary could barely fill her venues. Trump was packed to capacity with crowds circling around the block, yet none of this was ever shown. Fox reported this phenomenon.

    When someone asked the question here on GW about why Hillary wasn't getting the crowds, another poster explained that Hillary supporters weren't the type to go to these events! (Implying what?)

    So, to be honest, I was not surprised when Trump won. I'm still surprised that he was a candidate at all.

  • Annegriet
    5 years ago

    Paula--many of the protests have been very peaceful. I also don't agree with the destruction of personal property. BUT, I did think back to 7th grade a few minutes ago. Something I learned way back in the day about a little event on December 16, 1773. I believe some personal property was destroyed and yet we celebrate it today.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    5 years ago

    "Trump is less offensive than Hillary?"


    blfenton, yes, for some, big time. I'm not saying if that's how I feel but she's a very polarizing figure. There were plenty of people who hoped that they would fade from the public eye after Bill's presidential term ended. Such has obviously not been the case. Their collective post-White House conduct, and some of the nonsense involving the Presidential Library and their Foundation have not been to everyone's liking. Their response is consistent - we're ENTITLED to do as we wish.

  • bry911
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    Try to remember that some time ago we were sure that the country would be ripped apart in an election where the Electoral College tied and after 36 votes in the House we finally elected a president. Many were concerned our country couldn't withstand the revolution of 1800... But, Thomas Jefferson didn't destroy the country and that election was the introduction of the existing two party system that has worked for 200 years.

    Maybe this is that kind of change and maybe not, but the country will go on, well unless we give the nuclear codes to a megalomaniacal idiot (which Trump really isn't)...

  • adellabedella_usa
    5 years ago

    I'm less worried about a maniac president getting ahold of the nuke codes than I am some terrorists coming across the border to do some more damage here in our own country.

  • bry911
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    I'm less worried about a maniac president getting ahold of the nuke codes than I am some terrorists coming across the border to do some more damage here in our own country.

    Currently, there is no prevention for what you describe other than to limit the proliferation of nuclear material. The U.S. is simply too large for any real measure of border control.

    A wall will do nothing to stop a terrorist from coming in, it will just increase the cost of getting them in. The downside of increasing the cost of getting them in is that it incentivizes more impactful action. In other words, bigger explosions.

  • 66and76
    5 years ago

    Many of today's protesters are sincere, but they are also naive. There is big money from the Left that is funding the violence in order to reach a globalist agenda, not to make America stronger.

    http://wakingtimesmedia.com/billionaire-globalist-soros-exposed-hidden-hand-behind-trump-protests-provoking-us-color-revolution/

  • adellabedella_usa
    5 years ago

    It doesn't matter if they physically build a wall. The wall is just a visual. There are other ways of limiting access to our country. Cutting off the rewards of entering illegally would help more.

  • bry911
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    It doesn't matter if they physically build a wall. The wall is just a visual. There are other ways of limiting access to our country. Cutting off the rewards of entering illegally would help more.

    These are two different things. Stopping terrorists from entering the country and limiting illegal immigration are not the same thing. No, stopping one would not in any way help the other. A conservative think tank found even if we employed 1/10th of the nation's population as border guards it would have no significant effect on terrorism. I will find it when I get back.

  • petalique
    5 years ago

    Some thoughts.

    I'll miss Annie and hope she returns soon.

    Be aware that when someone states something akin to the following, it uses fallacious reasoning. Ex. "My brother has two PhDs (art history and biology) and he doesn't think for one second that the Challenger blew up because of a faulty O-ring."

    Unless the brother is an expert in the field at hand, his PhD or post doc or Mensa score is irrelevant. The above statement employs the logical fallacy _argument from authority_ or _appeal to authority_.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argument_from_authority

    There are people with assorted degrees who might habitually leave a cooked turkey on the counter overnight or goof when composing a simple sentence.

    Business owners tend to vote for the party they think will be better for their bottom line.

    The voters who supported Trump don't all come from the same motivation or perspective. I believe a good many (professionals or tradespeople, marginally employed or unemployed) might well be low-information(*1) voters. Some are surely racist, mysogynistic, anti-gay. I know (but don't play with Trump supporters who have spoken disparagingly of blacks, non-whites, and gays (LGBT). If someone utters the N word, or jig------ or other term, I think it's safe to conclude something unmistakable about what they are about in some of their beliefs.

    * LIVoter -- strong tendency toward unidimensional news, headline, emotional news; not wide, in depth or varied.

    I believe that there is a substantial element of internalized misogyny in some of the women disliking HRC.

    I think Trump recognized a good amount of "identity anxiety" and accompanying anger. "Crap, we've got a Whitehouse full of blacks and their friend for eight years! What? Now a woman! Maybe a femnazi. Over my dead body."

    Hillary Clinton, a "flawed" candidate? Remember Lee Atwater's handbook -- just repeat something often enough and long enough... Even NPR began parroting Fox News. There were no shenanigans with the Clinton Foundation. No quid pro quo. If certain officials from this or that country donated large sums, keep in mind that the Clinton Foundation does an enormous amount of charitable work both domestically and globally. It get's a solid "A" from a well regarded organization that reviews and rates charities. If King Tut gave a large donation to the CF in an attempt to curry favor politically, well, looks like all he got was tofu curry.

    HRC was repeatedly smeared by certain RW operators and media outlets. She got an undeserved bad rap. And repeated misinformation, sensationalized and misleading or untruthful headlines can stick to almost anyone. It's not about facts or truth, but about the power of innuendo or out and out lies (ex. The recent engineered lie by Fox News right before the election and which legitimized Trump repeating it at his rallies -- that an indictment would be forthcoming. BS of course, but I'll bet more than a few people still believe it, even though the liar "walked it back" more than a day later. Fox did a similar lie trick before Bush-Cheney's invasion of Iraq.

    I've seen more than a few straw man posts. Don't put words into someone else's mouth (post), then proceed to argue against them. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Straw_man

    Tonight 60 Minutes features an "interview" with Trump. Unfortunately the interviewer is going to be a softy. I imagine that is the only way the Donald would agree to it. No Anderson Cooper. And I doubt we'll ever see a well-informed strong interviewer get to sit down with Trump.



  • chisue
    5 years ago

    Could you tell me what crimes the Clintons have been found guilty of doing? Scandal? Oh, yes, the GOP has been cultivating that idea for decades, pretending their 'gas' was some kind of 'smoke', indicating underlying *fire*. Over and over...nothing.

  • Vertise
    5 years ago
    last modified: 5 years ago

    ' I don't consider that to be "leadership quality" and will continue to protest and hopefully stop the intimidation and harassment of the people Trump denigrated during his campaign.

    Please, while you are doing this, stop treating Republicans and those who voted for Trump in the same way. It's just as hard for them to experience, and for us all to witness the social violence. I understand how you hate that individual - get mad, protest peacefully, call him whatever you want - but there are many valid and/or desperate reasons half of your fellow Americans voted Trump and so it is no better to denigrate, intimidate, harrass, name-call and marginalize them as a group either.

    Same goes for Republicans in general. They are 'the diversity that dare not speak its name'. This is not social progress. All types of diversity are needed, not just genetic.


    Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt, PhD, NYU warns why this (Trump) is happening around the world, where it leads and advises on moving forward.

    Conference video from the American Psychological Association :

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/haidt-inside-the-head-of-trump-voters/