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Golden Sweet Cornbread

katefisher
13 years ago

I found this recipe on allrecipes.com a couple years ago. It has never failed me. With today being the first day of Fall it is time to break this out I thought tonight. Made it with tri tip chili tonight and won rave reviews from my husband. Enjoy.

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup yellow cornmeal

2/3 cup white sugar

1 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 egg

1 cup half and half

1/3 cup vegetable oil

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Spray or lightly grease a 9 inch round cake pan.

In a large bowl, combine flour, cornmeal, sugar, salt and baking powder. Stir in egg, milk and vegetable oil until well combined. Pour batter into prepared pan.

Bake in preheated oven for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Just as an aside I made two batches of 12 (24 total) in my new mini muffin pan. Cooked for 12 minutes. Yummy.

Kate

Comments (82)

  • lindac
    13 years ago

    Hoe cakes wwere traditionally cooked on a hoe and very VERY simple....just corn meal and water and perhaps a bit of grease.
    Then there are hush puppies which were bits of corn bread dough fried and tossed to the dogs...
    But you can make anything you want and call it anythign you want...
    My VERSION of corn bread contains sugar, flour and yellow corn meal....as well as baking soda, salt and milk an egg and butter.

  • annie1992
    13 years ago

    That's true, but traditional bread recipes were water, flour, salt, a leavening (or sometimes not). A zillion other things have evolved into being "bread", from banana bread to corn bread, with additives from garlic to cheese to sugar and spices.

    Original hoecakes were a mix of cornmeal and water, slapped on a hoe and cooked over a fire. I doubt that many of us would eat that voluntarily now, so I make my own hoecakes, ala Paula Deen and with more sugar because I'm from the north and that's what I do, LOL.

    Somehow, I think it's all good, in its own way. That's why I cook, so I can have things made the way I like them, not necessarily what's traditional.

    Oh, and tonight I'm having borscht. Probably not traditional, but with beef and beets, potatoes and cabbage. "Adapted" from a recipe I found on line. (grin)

    Annie

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  • katefisher
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Thanks Annie.

    Oh your recipe sounds much better. I don't really like mayo. I know that's un-American but there it is:)

    I'm going to try your recipe. Thank you.

    Kate

  • marys1000
    13 years ago

    Here I am in another cornbread thread wondering if there is a way to find a recipe that suits me. Maybe I should check the library for a cornbread recipe book? I don't eat it very often but when I make chili I think it sounds good theoretically.
    But I'm trying to cut down on sugar (so I've given up Jiffy)
    and fat a little
    and a medium and moist texture/crumb otherwise if its sort of rough/dry I want to put way to much butter on it
    so far I've cooked a few failures
    Is there any hope?

  • jude31
    13 years ago

    Oh, Linda C.....you shouldn't have mentioned hush puppies! I love them and Paula Deen has a fabulous, very simple recipe in one of her cookbooks, don't remember which one off hand and it's not near my computer. Yum yum!

    jude

  • beanthere_dunthat
    13 years ago

    Linda's description of hoe cakes is close to what I knew as cornbread -- self-rising WHITE corn meal and ice cold water (or buttermilk). That was it. We fried them in a cast iron pan (being short on hoes, I guess) in bacon fat if we had it, Crisco if we didn't. Probably ten zillion calories. :)

    Annie - I guess I wasn't clear. I eat the sweet yellow stuff as cake because I can't deal with it with dinner. :) I still prefer the white and no sugar in it. That said, I am going to follow your lead and make Kate's recipe as a breakfast item. I bet it would be good with a few blueberries on top, too.

    Amazing...a cornbread thread that didn't get contentious. We should be proud of ourselves! (I don't think I'm ready to revisit BBQ or cilantro topics anytime soon, though.)

  • annie1992
    13 years ago

    Hey, Renee, a blueberry shortcake, with that cornbread as the "shortcake"! Oh yeah....

    Annie

  • centralcacyclist
    13 years ago

    Marys1000, try the Sundowner recipe I posted with yogurt. It is always moist. Feel free to reduce the sugar. I cut it in half and still find it rather sweet.

  • doucanoe
    13 years ago

    Kate, I made your recipe last night. Added some frozen corn kernels and made it into muffins...YUM!

    Thanks, this recipe is a keeper!

    Linda

  • lindac
    13 years ago

    I was in the grocery store yesterday and one5 foot section of a shelf was filled with Jiffy corm bread mix...
    I wondered aloud to a fellow shopper, what they had taken off the shelves to allow Jiffy to expend 5 feet of shelf 2 box deep..
    She replied in a very southern accent "I don't care.....I can't find any self rising white corn meal....and I have looked all over....and I'm from Atlanta and I've only been here 3 weeks. Where am I going to get self rising corn meal???"
    Lol! I tried to sooth her....but shew as inconsolable...I think she may have been going to email home for a corn meal fix!!
    Linda C

  • beanthere_dunthat
    13 years ago

    Ah Linda, we southerners take our self-rising flour and cornmeal very seriously. :) I didn't know there was such a thing as NON self-rising flour (or cornmeal) until I was in high school. After so long away, I've finally gotten used to it, but what did I see at the grocery the other day? Self-rising flour!

  • annie1971
    13 years ago

    WE'VE LIVED IN THE SOUTH, WE'VE LIVED IN THE "MID ATLANTIC" AREA (WASHINGTON DC)-- WHATEVER THAT WAS; I'VE LIVED IN THE NORTH, THE NORTHWEST AND THE HIGH DESERT MOUNTAINS OF THE SOUTHWEST-- AND CORNBREAD IS JUST PLAIN WHAT YOU LIKE! WE LIKE IT SLIGHTLY SWEET AND THIS GOLDEN SWEET CORNBREAD SOUNDS DELIGHTFUL TO ME. WE'RE GOING TO MAKE IT THIS WEEK END TO SEE IF IT IS AN ADDITION TO OUR COLLECTION OF REGIONAL DELIGHTS.
    ANNIE'71

  • ann_t
    13 years ago

    Linda, you should have told her about the magic of Baking Powder. She could make her own self-rising flour or self-rising corn meal.

    It is only recently that they actually started to sell self-rising flour in Canada. I'd never seen it on our shelves before. Not something I have ever purchased.

    Ann

  • lindac
    13 years ago

    Oh I did....but a great deal of her angst was the absence of white cornmeal!!
    I tactfully didn't mention that there was no panko on the shelf, nor rolled wheat, nor golden syrup...and if she looked in the condiments Aisle she wouldn't find any kind of chutney, certainly not Major Grays....but across the aisle there would be 20 feet of salsa, pinto beans canned chiles, canned chilis in adobo and across the way half an aisle of corn chips....some even made of white corn meal.
    The joys of Walmart in small town Iowa!! LOL!

  • annie1992
    13 years ago

    Hmmmm. And here I am in small town Northern Michigan and I've always been able to find self rising flour, I just never used it because Grandma taught me to use all purpose with baking powder and it's always worked well for me. I can get white cornmeal too, but I can only get white and yellow, not any different grinds or textures. And that's at my small, local independent grocer.

    I'm still sorry I can't get White Lily, though.....

    Annie

  • cooksnsews
    13 years ago

    I recall self rising flour to be a staple in England when I lived there. But I suppose it isn't that hard to make space in your cupboard for another type of flour when the largest put-up any of them come in is 1.5 kg (think 3 lbs). My friends there though I was nuts to ever consider buying 20lbs at a time, but that's what I did before, and since. The cookie recipes they shared with me often only made 12 per batch....

    Oh ya, cornmeal was very difficult to source over there, as were a few other grocery items I was used to. But once you've passed the 3 month mark in any new environment, and realize that the grocery stores are absolutely FULL of items you may or may not recognise, you learn to use and enjoy what is available, and even eat like the locals.

  • beanthere_dunthat
    13 years ago

    Annie1971, why are you yelling at us? :D

    Annie1992, Don't fret about not being able to get White Lily anymore. They changed it, and it isn't nearly as nice as it used to be. I don't know what they did to it, but it's definitely not the same.

    Linda, if we end up moving to medium-sized town Iowa, I may need to pick your brain for what local goodies to keep an eye out for. :)

  • katefisher
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Linda, I'm glad you enjoyed the recipe. Your version sounds really good.

    I made these two nights back using my muffin pan. I also subbed applesauce/egg beaters for the oil/egg with great results. In fact last night I warmed them up to go with Tuna Noodle Casserole (believe it or not my husband asked for this) and they were still very moist.

    Kate

  • jojoco
    13 years ago

    Kate,
    I am definitely going to try your recipe. Sounds wonderful. Years ago, I heard about a knock off recipe for Boston Market's cornbread. The trick was to take a box of Jiffy White cake, and a box of Jiffy Cornbread and to mix each according to each box and then bake as one. It really is tasty. Not as harsh (to me) as authentic corn bread.
    Now, when I was at my dd's boarding school, in southern PA, last week, we found scrapple on the menu. Isn't that what I have heard described as "everything but the oink? (probably here.)
    I ordered eggs.
    Jude, where are you off to in Europe? Please tell us about your plans!
    Jo

  • lindac
    13 years ago

    Be still my heart! Fried scrapple with maple syrup!!
    And because it's fresh I can't even buy it mail order!!
    Linda C

  • katefisher
    Original Author
    13 years ago

    Scrapple? And here we are once again with me learning about something I knew nothing about. Off to Google 'scrapple'..,

    Kate

  • annie1971
    13 years ago

    Sorry -- I didn't mean to YELL. I didn't realize my caps were locked until I was finished (I was watching TV while typing) and was too lazy to re-do it.
    Annie'71

  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    13 years ago

    Once you google you scrapple you will never eat it!
    It's meant to be unanalyzed, like a basic hotdog or twinke.

  • jude31
    13 years ago

    Jo, 2 friends and I are heading to Frankfurt, Germany and will tool around for a few days and then meet in Basel, Switzerland with a larger group from our area. We're going on a "Castles on the Rhine" river cruise, my first time for a river cruise. I'm really excited about it and it will be totally different than other trips I have made to Europe.

    Thanks for asking.

    jude

  • jonsgirl
    12 years ago

    I'm looking for a recipe for a really moist sweet corn cake, I usually end up doctoring a Marie Callender mix but it always crumbles. I know corn bread does crumble, but I've had it in restaurants before where it was almost like a yellow cake with a corn taste sometimes with corn in it. Does anyone have a recipe or know what I can do to a mix to make it extra moist?

  • ann_t
    12 years ago

    This is my favourite. Sweet and moist. Homemade.

    Home Cookin Chapter: Recipes From Thibeault's Table

    Cornbread Loaf
    ==============
    1 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal
    1 cup all purpose flour
    1/3 cup sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon baking powder
    2 eggs
    6 tablespoons melted and cooled butter
    8 tablespoons melted and cooled vegetable shortening
    1 1/2 cups milk

    Preheat the oven to 400°. sift into a mixing bowl the cornmeal, flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. Beat the eggs lightly, add the melted butter and shortening, and stir in the 1 1/2 cups of milk. Pour into the bowl of dry ingredients and beat together for about a minute, or
    until smooth. Do not overbeat. Lightly butter an 8 x 12 inch shallow baking pan and pour in the batter. Bake in the center of the oven for about 30 minutes, or until the bread comes slightly away from the edge of the pan and is golden brown. If you wish you make bake the
    cornbread in a 9 x 5 x 3 inch loaf pan or in muffin tins. Increase the baking time to 45 minutes if using a loaf pan.

    Also great baked in a cast iron skillet.

  • jonsgirl
    12 years ago

    ann t,

    I can't wait to try this out, thank you!! I've been trying to adapt corn bread recipes and I can make them sweeter but could not get the texture right, this one looks to be a winner, I'll post back after I've made it. :)

  • jimster
    12 years ago

    This cornbread is neither golden nor sweet and it contains no wheat flour. I found it as part of my studies (student of Southern cooking) and like it very much.

    Real Cornbread
    From Butter Beans to Blackberries by Ronni Lundy

    4 tablespoons drippings
    2 cups fine ground white cornmeal
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    1 large egg
    1 and 1/2 cups milk or buttermilk

    Turn the oven on to 450 degrees. When it starts to get hot, put the drippings in a 9 inch cast iron skillet (or small cake pan, but a skillet is what you really want). Put the skillet in the oven and let it get really hot while you mix up the batter.

    Mix cornmeal, salt, baking soda and baking powder together well in a bowl. Add the egg and milk and stir until just blended. Don't beat.

    Remove the skillet from the oven and very carefully swirl the drippings around the pan to coat the inside. Drippings should be bubbly. If you're using butter and it's browned a bit, that fine. It'll make the cornbread yummy!

    Pour the drippings into the cornbread batter, stir just enough to incorporate, pour the batter back into the skillet and pop into the oven. It will take 20-25 minutes for it to turn brown around the edges and get firm in the middle. Remove and turn upside down on a sturdy plate to turn the cornbread out. (If it sticks, you can serve it straight from the pan.) Pass while it's hot.

    Jim

  • ci_lantro
    12 years ago

    One of the secrets to good cornbread is to use whole grain cornmeal. [None of that awful Quaker brand stuff!] My personal favorite is Hodgson Mill yellow cornmeal. Be sure to store unused cornmeal in the freezer. I'm supposing that milling your own cornmeal would be even better. I tried Bobs Red Mill cornmeal one time when I couldn't find HM. Didn't like the BRM as it seemed very dry.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Hodgson Mill

  • readinglady
    12 years ago

    My Southern step-mom made "plain" cornbread and ate it with clabber milk. That was one of her favorite comfort-food evening snacks.

    Cornbread is especially good if you warm drippings in a cast-iron pan and toast a little cornmeal then pour the cornbread batter on top. It adds a lovely crust.

    This is not a traditional Southern cornbread. This is a rich light cake. I'm sorry that I don't know the source of this recipe. I've had it at least forty years.

    I call this the cornbread for people who don't like cornbread. It isn't suitable for stuffing because it's too moist. I usually double the recipe for about 2 dozen muffins or do a single recipe in a cast iron gem pan. For muffins the baking time is about 18 minutes.

    Buttermilk Corn Bread

    1/4 cup butter, melted
    2 eggs
    1/4 cup sugar
    1 cup flour
    2/3 cup cornmeal
    2 tsp. baking powder
    1/4 tsp. baking soda
    3/4 tsp. salt
    1 cup buttermilk

    Melt butter. Beat eggs in large bowl. Add sugar and mix well. Sift together flour, cornmeal, baking powder, soda and salt. Stir in melted butter. Pour batter into buttered and floured 8x8x2-inch pan. Bake in preheated hot oven, 400 degrees, about 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out dry. Yields 8-12 servings.

    Carol

  • jonsgirl
    12 years ago

    LOL, that's exactly what I was looking for, "cornbread for people who don't like cornbread"! Thank you!

  • annie1992
    12 years ago

    jonsgirl, I've made Ann T's recipe and it's good, so now I'll have to make Carol's (readinglady). I do always heat my fat in my cast iron skillet and pour the batter into the hot pan because I like the crunchy crust.

    Jim, thanks for that recipe, Elery's daughter cannot have gluten and that will be perfect for her.

    I like cornbread both ways, I was lectured strictly by Elery's sister that corn bread is ONLY made with white corn meal and it NEVER has sugar. (shrug) There are people who believe things can be done only one way, I suppose, LOL.

    I really like the yellow cornmeal best and I like a little sugar in it, probably because that's how Grandma made it, and she always called it Johnny Cake. the white corn meal and no sugar cornbread that Elery makes is a bit dryer, more crumbly, not moist and not sweet. It's good for stuffing and for cornbread salad but if I'm going to have a muffin I'd rather have the sweeter/moister stuff.

    My girls always liked me to add corn kernels to corn bread, along with jalapenos and crumbled bacon, sometimes some grated cheese. I like it hot with butter and honey or sorghum molasses and I always have cornbread with beans, Grandma told me that those two foods together made a "complete protein".

    Yup, I think it's all good, I even make Jiffy Mix cornbread sometimes!

    Annie

  • jimster
    12 years ago

    In my case, "cornbread for people who don't like cornbread" has a different twist. I have never cared for the usual sweet cakey style of cornbread as an accompaniment to a meal. I will eat it if when served with a meal but don't enjoy it much. I like it better as a muffin with coffee for breakfast.

    So, as one who doesn't like cornbread, in that particular sense, the recipe I posted called "Real Cornbread" is one I truly enjoy alongside savory items in a dinner. I'm not trying to convert the rest of the world to my preferences in food, but I do recommend giving it a try. Those I have served it too thought it was good.

    Annie, let us know how the recipe works out for Elery's daughter. I'll bet Elery will like it too.

    Jim

  • ann_t
    12 years ago

    Jonsgirl, if that is what you are looking for, you will love mine.

    Unlike Jim, I have never thought of cornbread as something to be served with a meal. I like it for breakfast all by itself.

    I know many like to serve it with chili but I much prefer flour tortillas with my chili.

    I adjust the above recipe by reducing the sugar when I make it with the intentions of using it in a cornbread stuffing.

    If you want to serve it as a side with dinner, you can also reduce the sugar.

    Ann

  • dirtgirl07
    12 years ago

    After reading this I had to run get my book "Southern Heritage Breads" cookbook that's part of two books, the other being on cakes. They were put out by Southern Living and are great just for the old photos and pictures of handwritten recipes. Here's a few of the interesting old corn based breads they have - Corn Dodgers, Cornmeal Crisps, Scratch Backs, Corn Pones, Batty Cakes, Cornmeal Flapjacks, Kentucky Lace Cakes, Hoecakes, Hush Puppies, Awendaw, Spoonbread and Spider Bread.

    Only the corn "muffins" and flapjacks have the addition of sugar and it's only a couple of spoonfuls.

    Scratch Backs and Corn Dodgers were the boiling water and cornmeal, the Hoecakes had the addition of either scalded milk or egg.

    All in all they are great books because of the "lost" recipes that they include.

    My all time favorite cornbread is from my maternal grandmother:

    1 cup cornmeal
    1 cup sour cream
    1/2 cup oil
    2 teas baking powder (I use 1.5)
    3 eggs

    450 oven, 20 min's in 10 inch pan. It is a very moist cornbread.

    And we eat it year round. In fact, I like it best with a plate of homegrown tomatoes, fresh butterbeans, fresh fried corn, and fried okra.

  • jonsgirl
    12 years ago

    I really appreciate everyone's input, I know what I was asking for is really more of a sweet cake with a little corn taste... Annie please post back and let me know how Carols cornbread compares in texture to Ann T's. I've been known to make a Jiffy mix too in a pinch!

  • gwtamara
    12 years ago

    I do cooking demonstrations as part of a historical reenactment group and I can't tell you how many hundreds of batches of cornbread that I've probably made over the years. It's a good dish to prepare to demonstrate cast-iron cooking over an open fire and makes for easy sampling. I've tried many different recipes, but the one that everyone seems to love the most? The Jiffy cornbread. It comes out consistently good. Always makes me chuckle. I usually use Jiffy for my Thanksgiving stuffing. It felt wrong, at first, but when no one could ever tell the difference...well, I quickly learned. ;)

    That being said -- I do love making it from scratch and often try out different recipes based on what sounds good. It's all good!

  • jimster
    12 years ago

    Now that I have discovered a good non-sweet, non-cakelike cornbread to be eaten with a meal, I realize I should try a sweeter, more cakelike cornbread like Ann's for breakfast. The problem with most of the cornbreads I've had is that they were neither here not there, not good bread and not good cake.

    Ann, a real Southerner can tell you better but, as a meal accompaniment, cornbread is often served with BBQ. Also cornbread is served topped with cowpeas, pot likker (liquor) and cha cha (chow chow) and probably a few shakes of hot sauce. That's not just for breakfast anymore. ;-) Then there are hushpuppies, (hey are cornbread aren't they?) with catfish. Not one of my favorites, but I'm trying to make a point.I would like to hear more examples from those who know Southern cooking better than I.

    I'm with you re the chili. I like tortillas with that or even a crusty French bread.

    Jim

  • kframe19
    12 years ago

    My use for cornbread more or less starts with chili and ends with beef stew. LOVE cornbread with both, but don't really care for it otherwise.

    That said, I want to make a pot of chili, so I need to make cornbread.

    Has anyone ever baked the recipe at the head of this thread in a cast iron skillet? How does it react? With that amount of sugar I'd be worried about the bottom burning.

  • annie1992
    12 years ago

    Michael, I bake all my cornbread in my cast iron skillet, from the sweet to the not sweet to the Jiffy mix and have never had a problem with the bottom burning.

    I do use a muffin pan for muffins, but other than that it's cast iron. I even have a corn bread muffin pan shaped like fish and another shaped like kittens, and they are both cast iron too.

    Annie

  • readinglady
    12 years ago

    I think cast iron is perfect, regardless of the recipe. It retains heat so evenly I'd guess scorching is less of a risk, not more.

    After all, it's great for pineapple upside down cake and that definitely has plenty of sugar.

    Carol

  • arley_gw
    12 years ago

    The cornbread holy wars erupt every so often. I do prefer a nonsweet cornbread simply because I don't care for sweet stuff all that much, and I like cornbread with savory stuff like beans and chili.

    I found an old post I posted some years back (hard to believe I've been spewing out opinions for five years now on CF!!) on the subject. For those of you looking for a non-sweet cornbread, I've never found anything better than this one, from Bernard Clayton:

    I will grant a point to those who use 'adulterants' :) like sugar and flour: unless the quality of the corn meal is very good, cornbread made with just corn meal can be bitter. Meal can go rancid and stale pretty quickly. But cornbread made with fresh cornmeal, preferably stone-ground locally, is plenty sweet on its own.

    I generally only buy small quantities of cornmeal--just enough to make whatever recipe I'm making, and I buy it at a store that seems to have a good turnover of product. (That means not buying it at a gourmet store. No telling how long that stuff has been on the shelf.)

    Fortunately in my area of South Carolina there are a few grist mills not too far away that supply the local stores.

    Bernard Clayton's 'New Complete Book of Breads' actually has a listing for 2 different breads. One he calls "Yankee Corn Bread" (sugar, flour, yellow corn meal) and the other is Southern Corn Bread (white corn meal, no sugar or flour.)

    I find, though, that the freshness of the meal is more important than whether it's white or yellow.

    For those with access to good fresh meal I recommend this recipe for Southern Corn Bread, from Clayton:

    2 eggs, room temp
    2 cups buttermilk, room temp
    1 tsp baking soda
    2 cups white cornmeal (but yellow is okay, too)
    1 1/2 tsp salt

    Preheat oven and baking utensil (skillet or 9 x 9 pan) to 450 while mixing batter.

    In a small bowl beat the eggs and mix in the buttermilk. In a mixer bowl, mix the baking soda, cornmeal and salt. Pour in the egg-buttermilk mixture and mix well until smooth.

    Pour batter into the preheated pan, return to oven for 20 to 25 minutes. It's done when a knife inserted into the center of the pan comes out clean & dry.

    I use this recipe when I make cornbread dressing for Thanksgiving; a quadruple recipe just barely fits into a 5 quart KitchenAid mixer bowl, and into an 11 x 14 pan. Absolutely delicious.

    This is what you use to soak up the pot juices from cooking black-eyed peas or greens. I always called those juices 'pot liquor' but my wife wondered what the heck I was talking about when I used that term. I guess that's southern as well.

  • annie1992
    12 years ago

    arley, we've always called the juices from green "pot likker" too, and no, it's not "liquor" in my family. (grin)

    Grandpa was from Canada and my parents spent their whole lives in Michigan, just like I have and my children have, so I don't know where in the world the southern influence would come from. Grandma (who raised me) was from Ohio but came to Michigan when she was in her 20s....

    Annie

  • arley_gw
    12 years ago

    Annie, I stand corrected on the spelling; especially when you can call for support from such authorities as Huey Long, Zell Miller and the New York Times. (see the link)

    Now that's not to be confused with the late, great Georgia fiddler, Gid Tanner, who called his band the Skillet Lickers.

    Here is a link that might be useful: pot liquor versus potlikker

  • annie1992
    12 years ago

    Oh dear, arley, a dam*yankee (one word)? And Webster too? For shame. :-)

    Heck, I didn't even know I was right, I just assumed it was my rather redneck family upbringing coming out!

    Annie

  • arley_gw
    12 years ago

    In 1935 Huey Long was filibustering against the establishment of the Social Security Administration, and back then you had to really filibuster, standing up and talking for whatever time you could spend (he spent 15 1/2 hours); he rambled on and on about the Bible, then southern music, then southern cooking, and then talked about the life-sustaining qualities of potlikker and the proper way to consume it. (Best sipped, or dip your cornbread into it.)

    Wasn't too life sustaining for him, though; within a couple of months of that famous filibuster, someone whose family he ruined assassinated him.

  • readinglady
    12 years ago

    With a Southern step-mother (world's greatest cream pie baker) I learned early on that "real" cornbread was dry, crumbly and never sweet; vegetables were always cooked at least 20 minutes (preferably with ham hock); steak was always chicken-fried (I went to college before I encountered a grill or broiler); and definitely one of the good things in life is "pot likker."

    And in the same vein, it's poke salat not poke salad.

    Getting back to cornbread, one recipe that hasn't been mentioned is James Beard's. Now if you want rich, James Beard is the man to rely on:

    In his American Cookery he says this recipe from Jeanne Owen is "The finest corn bread I have ever eaten . . ."

    Sugar is minimal, but well-compensated for in the richness of eggs, cream and butter. Julia Child would be proud.

    Jeanne OwenÂs Corn Bread

    1/2 cup sifted flour
    1 1/2 cups yellow corn meal
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon sugar
    3 teaspoons baking powder
    3 eggs, well beaten
    1 cup milk
    1/4 cup cream
    1/3 cup melted butter

    Sift all the dry ingredients together in a mixing bowl. Add the eggs and milk and beat with a wooden spoon. Beat in the cream, and lastly the melted butter. Pour into an 8 1/2 x 11-inch well-buttered pan and bake at 400 degrees approximately 15 to 18 minutes. Cut in square while still hot and fold into a napkin before serving.

    Another classic from Beard on Bread is his good friend Helen Evans Brown's Corn Chili Bread.

    3 ears of fresh, uncooked corn
    1 cup yellow cornmeal
    2 tsp. salt
    3 tsp. double-acting baking powder
    1 cup sour cream
    3/4 cup melted butter
    2 eggs, well beaten
    1/4 pound Gruyere or Monterey Jack cheese, very finely diced
    1 4-oz. can peeled green chilis, finely chopped.

    Scrape kernels from the corn cobs and combine with remaining ingredients. Pour into a well-buttered 9-inch baking dish or 2 1/2-quart souffle dish. Bake in a pre-heated 350 degree oven for one hour. Serve with butter or the sauce from the main dish.

    Carol

  • dirtgirl07
    12 years ago

    Jim, I'm just about as Southern as Southern gets and I just have to say I've never ever eaten my BBQ with cornbread! Oh my, that just sounds like a terrible combination. But cornbread with butterbeans piled on top, or collards and blackeyed peas, with potlikker. Very good.

    When my folks were young and had no money cornbread covered in great northern beans was the meal of the day. They still joke about 'poor' food being some of the best eating.

    Come to think of it, the only meat I associate eating cornbread with is ham. Otherwise, it's always with vegetables.

    Beth

  • jimster
    12 years ago

    Thanks, Beth. You are adding to my Southern cooking education.

    I'm from upstate NY, and the BBQ joints there serve cornbread with all the dinners. I guess they think it is a "Southern thang", and I thought so too, as did the three other yankees I'm with today. But you say "no way".

    I had to do some research. I googled 2 BBQ joints in Memphis, Birmingham, Kansas City, Raleigh and Orlando. Yeh, I'm serious about my education. Of all those, only Sonny's in Florida served cornbread with BBQ. But Florida isn't a real Southern state, is it? Bubbalou's Bodacious in Orlando has cornbread only with a bowl of Brunswick Stew or a bowl of collard greens. ($6.99 for a bowl of collards! Yikes!)

    So, I learned something today. That's always a good thing.

    Jim

  • dirtgirl07
    12 years ago

    Jim, I really had to think about this a little. The one upscale rib place here always served the ribs with homemade garlic rolls and the 'joints' just had the rolls as for sandwiches. At home, if we eat any bread with the bbq, it's usually crusty french bread.

    One of the few Southern joints left here in Atlanta is the Auburn Ave Rib Shack. I'll have to check on them.

    And then there's that one other reason for non-sweet cornbread... cornbread and milk! Mmm, makes me want some right now.

    Beth