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Fresh Corn on the Cob

echooooo
14 years ago

I've got 6 ears, we are not big corn-on-the-cob eaters. What else can I do with it?

Comments (52)

  • lindac
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    If you are not big corn on the cob eaters.....why would you buy out of season corn?
    Cut it off the cob and make creamed corn or corn fritters.
    Linda C

  • bunnyman
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    My dog Dolly loves corn on the cob. Kind of messy when she chews it up so it is an outside treat.

    : )
    lyra

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  • ruthanna_gw
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Make a salad for your lunch today:

    CORN AND SHRIMP SALAD

    4 large or 6 small ears of fresh corn
    1/2 cup salad oil
    1/4 cup cider vinegar
    1 Tbs. sweet-hot mustard
    2 tsp. fresh lemon juice
    2 tsp. sugar
    1 1/2 tsp. minced fresh basil or 1/2 tsp dried
    1/8 tsp. ground red pepper
    1 small red pepper, chopped
    1 small green pepper chopped
    1/2 cup chopped green onions (scallions)
    1/2 lb. small cooked shrimp, shelled and cleaned

    Remove husks from corn. Cook in boiling water for 3 minutes. Remove pot from heat, cover, and let stand for 5 minutes. Drain: plunge corn into a large bowl of ice water for 1 minute; then remove and set aside. Combine all ingredients except corn, in a large bowl. Cut corn off cobs and add to salad mixture. Mix well. Cover and chill.

    Note: This is the original way I made this but now I just cut the corn off the cobs and microwave it, covered, for 3 or 4 minutes, before mixing it in with the salad ingredients. I sometimes add small cubes of zucchini and some sliced black olives. You can also substitute dill for the basil.

  • annie1992
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I agree with Ruthanna, I'd make a salad. I often do, I like mine with corn and beans:

    Black Bean and Corn Salad
    From Prevention Healthy Cooking.

    Makes:4 servings

    1 can (15 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained
    2 cups fresh or thawed frozen corn
    2 jalapeno chile peppers, seeded and finely chopped
    2 tomatoes, seeded and chopped
    1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
    2 tablespoons lime juice
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 tablespoon chili powder
    1 tablespoon cumin

    1. In a large bowl, combine beans, corn, peppers, tomatoes, onion, garlic, and cilantro.
    2. In a small bowl or measuring cup, mix lime juice, oil, and seasonings. Pour over salad. Cover and refrigerate 1 hour to allow flavors to develop.

    Or you could make Ashley's favorite, corn chowder. I ate this chowder, prepared by the Chef himself, at a demonstration last year and it was better than mine, so I promptly switched recipes. It's probably the cream. (grin) Mine just called for milk.....

    Michigan Sweet Corn Chowder
    Chef Eric Villegas
    Fork in the road

    Fresh Michigan sweet corn chowder

    4 tbsp (2 ounces) unsalted "sweet" butter
    1 cup diced white or yellow onion
    1/2 cup diced leek, white part only
    1 heaping tsp roasted garlic puree (I use minced garlic, but it's wonderful with the roasted puree)
    1/2 lb red skin potatoes, washed and sliced
    9 10 ears of fresh sweet corn, shucked, kernels removed, reserving "bones" (cobs)
    2-4 cups heavy cream
    French sea salt
    ClancyÂs Fancy Hot Sauce (or other you have)
    Juice of 1/2 small lemon

    In a 3 quart saucepan, melt the butter, sauté the onion and leek over a moderate heat, until al dente, about 10 minutes. Add the roasted garlic puree and the sliced red skin potatoes cook another three minutes or until the potatoes are warmed and completely coated in the butter. Add the "corn bones" and ½ the kernels, along with the cream, reserving the remaining kernels for service. Simmer 30 minutes or until the potatoes are well cooked and the "bones" have released their flavor. Squeeze in lemon juice and season with salt to taste.

    Place remaining corn kernels in bowls, ladle chowder over top and serve with hot sauce.

    Annie

  • dixiedog_2007
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Great sounding soup Annie. I've saved it.

    I really like this salad of Paula's. Easy and good.

    Corn, Avocado, and Tomato Salad Recipe courtesy Paula Deen
    2 cups cooked corn, fresh or frozen (I've used Shoepeg corn right out of the can and drained when corn is not fresh)
    1 avocado, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
    1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved
    1/2 cup finely diced red onion

    Dressing:

    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1/2 teaspoon grated lime zest
    1 tablespoon fresh lime juice (she squeezed a whole lime on the show)
    1/4 cup chopped cilantro
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon pepper

    Combine the corn, avocado, tomatoes and onion in a large glass bowl. Mix together the dressing ingredients in another bowl, pour over the salad, and gently toss to mix.

  • lakeguy35
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Fritters or salad for me too. Ina's corn salad is simple and always hit with my group. The key to this recipe is the fresh basil, don't sub dried.

    I can't wait until the local corn is ready. I can and do make a meal of it while it's available. Also, freeze some for the off season.

    David

  • Rusty
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Corn IS in season in the zone 9 I live in. . . .
    At least judging by the way it was priced in the store just now. . . . .
    Rusty

  • hawk307
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    David:
    I just bought some at Walmarts.
    I don't know where it is from but I don't care, It was good.

    It was large kernel, not a dark yellow. A very light Yellow.

    I always sample it in the store and tell all the women who are watching " It's Good "
    - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Echooooooooo oooooooo ooooo oooo ooo oo o !!!!!!
    You must look strange with 6 ears. LOL !!!

    You can boil them. Put on a lot of butter and beat them?
    Then you will have Creamed Corn on the Cob.

    Cathy :
    Isn't that still Corn on the Cob ?

    Did any ever POP while in the Oil? Hot Damn !!!

    David :
    The fritters sound good to me too!!!

    Bye!!!
    LOU

  • october17
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    In the south they bread the ear of corn before deepfrying. Also Yummo!

  • mustangs81
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Lou, None have popped but then I didn't use popping corn!

    October, I'm in the South but have never see/heard breading the corn. Sounds uhh...interesting.

  • hawk307
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    OcT 17:
    How do you do that?

    Mustangs :
    You're not in the South, that's North, Fla.
    Lou

  • annie1992
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I like mine best right out of the garden, just strip off the husks and eat it, uncooked. My girls like it that way too, Grandpa taught us that particular dining pleasure.

    But, since the OP isn't a big fan of "corn on the cob", I figured she wouldn't like it fresh and uncooked, LOL.

    Deep fried corn? It sounds yummy and yet seems so wrong on so many levels, LOL.

    Annie

  • hawk307
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Annie:
    I do that in the Market, to see if it sweet and tender.

    I keep saying things that remind me of women I know.
    If it's not sweet and tender, I buy the one ear.

    The deer like any kind of corn.

    I have some for tonite. I'm going to boil them and smear
    them with Butter. That's easy.

    Echoooo !!! Get to know what GoooooooDD is .
    LOU

  • BeverlyAL
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Lived in the south all of my life and never heard of breading corn on the cob.

    Cathy, deep fried sounds really good.

    So does your recipe David. I can't wait until corn comes in so I can try it.

    Beverly

  • ltcollins1949
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I've lived in the south for 40+ years, and I have never heard of fried corn. BTW, I lived in Tallahassee and the surrounding area for many years, and although it is in Florida, the panhandle is as "UN-Florida" as you can get. It's more like south Georgia and/or south Alabama.

  • hawk307
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Ltcollins: I was Joking when I said,

    Mustangs, wasn't in the South. Please,leave it be !!!

    While you all figure out which is the Best way and wait for it to come in Season,
    I had mine boiled, with Butter and Salt. It was Great!!!

    This Photo should be in WFD. Can you guess what kind of a sandwhich, I'm going to make?
    Lou

  • ltcollins1949
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Sorry, I guess I was just a little dense yesterday!

  • hawk307
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    LtCollins:
    That's OK , so was I , in fact every day !!!

    It's a nice day here but according to the weather Channel,
    it don't look good down there.

    Lou

  • foodonastump
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I was surprised to find loads of fresh corn on the cob at the market the other day, as if it was August! Turns out they're from Florida which of course that means they're going to be at least a couple days old. I wonder if they're any good? Guess I'll just have to try.

  • cookie8
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    We have been getting corn up in Canada for the past three weeks and it is remarkably good. For these recipes posted, can I use niblets? I love it off the cob too much to steer away from tradition (same with the family). Once it's more in season up here (and cheaper) I will use the cob corn.

  • mustangs81
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    LtCollins: FYI the fried corn happened to be on the main highway on the south end of Tallahassee. It was a BarBQ joint.

  • ltcollins1949
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    WOW! How did I miss that? That would have been Monroe Street if remember correctly, . . .it runs right in front of the Capital Building where I used to work. Hum, I still have friends over there, so maybe I need to go visit again and try that fried corn sometime. My SIL's family still lives there, so I'll try to get the name of the BBQ joint! Thanks.

  • lowspark
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I just bought some corn on the cob yesterday at the grocery store for 6 for $1. Weeee!! I love the stuff, and we just eat it right off the cob. It'll be on the menu tonight.

  • caavonldy
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Many of the Mexican folks around here eat it with mayonnaise on it. Seems strange to me, but that's how they like it.

  • shaun
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Hi!! Sorry I'm late - I was out of town. But here's the Rachel Ray video on how to remove the little silkies from the corn on the cob.

  • shaun
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Bunnyman- after seeing your post on how Dolly likes corn on the cob,I gave my dog a corn on the cob.

    He ate the whole thing. Not a piece left.

    Just got back from the vet $296 later, he may need surgery for the blockage.

    Not a good treat! Just a little FYI to keep our four legged friends safe.

  • hawk307
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Shaun;
    I like the tip on removing the silkies from the Cobb.

    Didn't like the Comments but it seems like anybody can say what they want now.

    Hope your Dog is OK !

    Lou

  • caavonldy
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I hope your dog is better. Thanks for the warning that we should never give corn on the cob to our dogs.

  • shaun
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    LOU
    I know, some of those comments were really nasty!

    Caavonldy thank you! I think he will be ok, he's passing the cob thru his mouth. What a scare I had today!

  • coconut_nj
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Yikes Shaun! I hope it all comes up. I won't let my dog[s] eat the whole cob but I have taught all of them through the years to eat the corn right off the cob like we do. LOL. You hold it for them and they generally get it quite fast. It's so funny to watch them chew, chew. They do a good job too.

    I'm so sorry your dog had such a problem. I'll keep him in my thoughts.

  • shaun
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Thanks coconutnj! I think he's gonna be ok. The cob is still coming up and out so that's a good sign according to my vet.

    I had NO idea he'd eat the whole cob; I thought he'd just eat the kernels. But nooooooooo he ate the whole shebang.

    So far I've learned to not give dogs pork, chocolate, onions and now I'm adding corn on the cob to the list.

  • ltcollins1949
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    OT: I know this is a cooking forum, but pet owners might want to remember what foods not to give to pets.

    Chocolate, Macadamia nuts, avocadosthese foods may sound delicious to you, but theyre actually quite dangerous for our animal companions. Our nutrition experts have put together a handy list of the top toxic people foods to avoid feeding your pet. As always, if you suspect your pet has eaten any of the following foods, please note the amount ingested and contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.

    Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine
    These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds, the fruit of the plant used to make coffee and in the nuts of an extract used in some sodas. When ingested by pets, methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Note that darker chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. White chocolate has the lowest level of methylxanthines, while baking chocolate contains the highest.

    Alcohol
    Alcoholic beverages and food products containing alcohol can cause vomiting, diarrhea, decreased coordination, central nervous system depression, difficulty breathing, tremors, abnormal blood acidity, coma and even death.

    Avocado
    The leaves, fruit, seeds and bark of avocados contain Persin, which can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. Birds and rodents are especially sensitive to avocado poisoning, and can develop congestion, difficulty breathing and fluid accumulation around the heart. Some ingestions may even be fatal.

    Macadamia Nuts
    Macadamia nuts are commonly used in many cookies and candies. However, they can cause problems for your canine companion. These nuts have caused weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia in dogs. Signs usually appear within 12 hours of ingestion and last approximately 12 to 48 hours.

    Grapes & Raisins
    Although the toxic substance within grapes and raisins is unknown, these fruits can cause kidney failure. In pets who already have certain health problems, signs may be more dramatic.

    Yeast Dough
    Yeast dough can rise and cause gas to accumulate in your pets digestive system. This can be painful and can cause the stomach or intestines to rupture. Because the risk diminishes after the dough is cooked and the yeast has fully risen, pets can have small bits of bread as treats. However, these treats should not constitute more than 5 percent to 10 percent of your pets daily caloric intake.

    Raw/Undercooked Meat, Eggs and Bones
    Raw meat and raw eggs can contain bacteria such as Salmonella and E. coli that can be harmful to pets. In addition, raw eggs contain an enzyme called avidin that decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin), which can lead to skin and coat problems. Feeding your pet raw bones may seem like a natural and healthy option that might occur if your pet lived in the wild. However, this can be very dangerous for a domestic pet, who might choke on bones, or sustain a grave injury should the bone splinter and become lodged in or puncture your pets digestive tract.

    Xylitol
    Xylitol is used as a sweetener in many products, including gum, candy, baked goods and toothpaste. It can cause insulin release in most species, which can lead to liver failure. The increase in insulin leads to hypoglycemia (lowered sugar levels). Initial signs of toxicosis include vomiting, lethargy and loss of coordination. Signs can progress to recumbancy and seizures. Elevated liver enzymes and liver failure can be seen within a few days.

    Onions, Garlic, Chives
    These vegetables and herbs can cause gastrointestinal irritation and could lead to red blood cell damage. Although cats are more susceptible, dogs are also at risk if a large enough amount is consumed. Toxicity is normally diagnosed through history, clinical signs and microscopic confirmation of Heinz bodies. An occasional low dose, such as what might be found in pet foods or treats, likely will not cause a problem, but we recommend that you do NOT give your pets large quantities of these foods.

    Milk
    Because pets do not possess significant amounts of lactase (the enzyme that breaks down lactose in milk), milk and other milk-based products cause them diarrhea or other digestive upset.

    Salt
    Large amounts of salt can produce excessive thirst and urination, or even sodium ion poisoning in pets. Signs that your pet may have eaten too many salty foods include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, elevated body temperature, seizures and even death. In other words, keep those salty chips to yourself!

  • foodonastump
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Shaun that is so scary - glad everything seems to be working out. Good luck.

    If you listen to some of the fanatics over in Pets, they object to the mainstream dog foods because the main ingredient is corn, which they claim to be the least digestable for dogs.

    There are also several proponants of a raw diet over there, so I wonder how they'd react to ltcollins' quote on the subject.

    Lastly but most relevent to the original topic, last night I picked up some of that FL corn from a quality market. It was edible but I was not impressed. Part of the problem may have been that it was boiled rather than steamed - I prefer steamed - but I figure by the time it gets to market up north it's lost quality. I can wait until later summer for the good local stuff.

  • shaun
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    ltcollins, thanks for that list.

    Food/stump.... thanks, he seems to be doing better without surgery. Still keeping an eye on him for the next couple of days.

    The cob is still coming out and he doesnt seem to be in any distress/pain.

  • ltcollins1949
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    foodonastump

    I know that some of them are proponants of a raw diet, but the information which I quoted was from the ASPCA, and I trust the information they provide. Also, I don't give my dogs any raw meat and/or raw bones for many reasons, including my Vet is totally opposed to it.

    shaun, I hope your dog gets well fast!

  • ltcollins1949
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Oh yes, here is the thread on the Pet Forum about proponants of a raw diet. I think I pulled a leash that has gotten me into trouble. HA!

  • dixiedog_2007
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Shaun, very scary. I'm glad to hear that your dog is doing better.

  • annie1992
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Shaun, I hope Ricky is better. I used to give the WonderWeiner corn on the cob but he would never eat the cob, just chewed the corn off it. I guess that's a good thing.

    I think there are many schools of thought on what you should or shouldn't feed your pet. Dogs did just fine without commercial dog food (upon which veterinarians make a tidy profit, incidentally) until the last century.

    Elery's dog has never eaten dog food in his life, he's 13 and the vet says he's amazingly healthy although he's too fat. That vet also says that our dogs are getting the same "junk food diet" that we're getting as a country, but in pet food form, so even the veterinarians have differing opinions.

    At any rate, Shaun, I'm glad that Ricky is doing better.

    Annie

  • lakeguy35
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Oh man, I hope little Ricky is doing okay. I can't believe the little dude took on the whole cob! Guess he was on a mission for sure. Give him a little pat from me Shaun.

    David

  • coconut_nj
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    There are many vets who have taken the time to understand and are now supporting raw diets in dogs and cats. I know many raw fed animals. If you could just see the pictures of these animals you would see the gorgeous shiny coats and perfect teeth that are some of the benefits of raw diets. Sure lots of animals do great on kibble. My own dog is kibble fed. Food allergies are a real problem for a lot of animals and grains are about the largest cause, so many have gone to raw just because of that factor and seen quick and dramatic results. We all want long healthy lives for our animals. Raw or kibble, or home cooked is up to you and what your animal will tolerate. My dog would be on raw except for the fact that I'd need another chest freezer. My extra freezer is taken up with my regular cooking. He does get raw meaty bones and has the teeth to prove it.

    It takes a lot of research and figuring out ratios to feed a good raw diet, so it's certainly not a lazy way to feed.

    The funniest thing to me is worrying about the dog/cat getting e coli from raw meat and eggs when....well.. let's face it, how many dogs have eaten poop directly?? People call them kitty snacks for a reason. LOL

  • shaun
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Thanks for the well wishes for Ricky. I think he's going to be ok without surgery now.

    David I cant believe he ate that whole cob either! I thought he would do like Annie's WW and just nibble the corn that was left on it.

    Hey Annie, what did Elery's dog eat all this time? People food? Or did he make the food for him?

    coconut! *kitty snacks* hahahahah!!!!

  • coconut_nj
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Good for Ricky! Sounding better all the time. Just a note of caution, pieces of things can stay inside them for a very long time before causing a problem. So, just keep an eye in the future for not eating, hard belly, etc. I'm only warning you because I had a dog who had eaten the top of a toy and I didn't realize I didn't get all the pieces when she did it and a whole year later it finally caused an obstruction and she had to have surgery. Really you don't need to be worried it's just something to be aware of.

    Also Shaun, don't feel bad about him eating the whole cob, I've known many dogs who want to eat the whole thing and a few who have tried. Smiles.

    Did ya'll know that in Italy they sell 25# bags of dried pasta as dog food? I just find that fascinating. Especially since I'm such a pasta head. LOL..

    Talk about hijacking eh? We've done a pretty good job. Echooooo might be pretty sorry by now they asked for copies of follow-ups... heh...sorry.

  • ltcollins1949
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Sorry for hijacking this post when I only intended to be a helpful. I posted the information in good faith to try and help our pets. I was very surprised to see so many people attack the post because they have differing ideas than the ASPCA. I realize we all have our own opinions, but since I'm not a vet, I have to trust my vet to take care of my 5 dogs and 8 cats. Not too long ago, I lost 5 of my cats to old age, one was 20, and I lost my beloved Golden last September at the age of 15. So I love my pets so much, and I know others do too, so I was just trying to help. I guess I was wrong.

    Sorry if I caused problems. I guess from now on, I'll just read rather than try to help.

  • foodonastump
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    "Sorry if I caused problems. I guess from now on, I'll just read rather than try to help."

    I have no idea why you feel that way. While there might have been a little disagreement here, certainly no attacks.

  • ltcollins1949
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    No, but I felt attacked on the Pet Forum. Sorry I wasn't more clear.

    And I love to cook, so I'll continue reading and posting if I can be of assistance.

    I'm getting ready for vacation (actually taking my granddaughters to camp in Indiana), so I've got to go.

    Have a great week.

  • annie1992
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Shaun, Pancho gets whatever we eat, minus the obvious problems like chocolate, onions, grapes and raisins, cooked chicken bones, etc. He loves mashed rutabaga, go figure, I couldn't even get my kids to eat THAT!

    ltcollins, we have a lot of differing opinions here on nearly anything, but we're generally pretty nice about it.

    Annie

  • shaun
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Hold your corn cobs ladies, I believe I'm the one who highjacked this with my dear doggie eating a corn cob. hahahahah!!!!

    ltcollins you didnt cause any problems at all! Not that I saw. I'm careful on the Pet Forum, some of them bite. But a lot of them are very helpful.

    Coconut thank you! I will definitely keep an eye on him and watch for anything unusual.

    Annie, Ricky would LOVE to be able to eat what we eat! He loves people food. I never met a dog who acted as hungry as Ricky does. He gobbles up anything you give him and doesnt even chew it.... he's like a piranha! Even if he just ate his dinner, if you offered him a piece of cheese, he'll want it. He never refuses food.

  • annie1992
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Shaun, the WonderWeiner always ate whatever we ate too, minus the above named problems. He did get into the pantry once and eat a whole box of fudge covered granola bars but didn't even seem to get a tummy ache. He also ate a box of crayons once and pooped different colors for about a week, LOL.

    I started giving him commercial dog food on the advice of his vet, who said he was getting too fat. Probably all the Oreos he shared with Ashley, LOL, or the bowl of cereal and milk he had every day with Amanda. Or both. Anyway, less than a year later he was dead.

    I'm sorry I ever made him eat a mouthful of that commercial stuff, he hated it. He did lose weight, because he just didn't like it. I'm still wishing I had just let him eat all the good organic beef and vegetables, free range eggs and homemade bread that we ate and that he loved.

    Annie

  • JoanM
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I'm glad your pup is OK Shaun. I accidentally fed corn to one of mine the other day. While cutting some off the cob for a new recipe a lot wound up on the floor so I let her eat it. I got the finger wagged in my face for letting her eat corn with her digestive issues. At least I didn't drop the cob. LOL

    Back to corn...

    It is so cheap and so sweet in FL right now that I went looking for a different way to prepare it. I found a recipe that I had saved from the guy who won Rachael Ray's so you think you can cook contest last year. I liked it alot. I completely forgot to add the butter at the end but I can say that it was real tasty even without the butter. I just finished the leftovers. Yum!

    Carmelized corn
    Pete from Rachel Ray
    3 tablespoons EVOO Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    4 to 5 ears (2 cups) fresh corn, cut off cob
    Salt and freshly ground black pepper
    3 shallots, minced
    1 clove garlic, minced
    5 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped
    1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped
    1 tablespoon fresh chives, chopped
    1/2 cup dry white wine (preferably Sauvignon Blanc)
    2 tablespoons butter

    Heat 1 tablespoon EVOO in a large skillet over high heat. Add corn, a good pinch of salt and 2 to 3 turns freshly ground pepper. Toss corn to coat lightly with EVOO and cook until slightly browned and caramelized, approximately 2-3 minutes.

    Lower heat under corn to medium-high. Add remaining 2 tablespoons EVOO to the pan along with the shallots, garlic, 5 tablespoons parsley, thyme and chives. Re-season with salt and pepper, give everything a toss and cook until the shallots are translucent. Deglaze the pan with the white wine, scraping bottom of pan to pull up any brown bits. Cook for 1 minute. Cut butter into small chunks and scatter over corn. Cook till wine is reduced by half

  • annova914
    14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    This recipe is adapted from the Neeleys' grilled corn salad (I think it was their dressing that just seemed to me to "need something" so I tossed in some Italian dressing and then it was perfect :) Ann

    Grilled Corn Salad

    6 ears fresh corn, husked, silks removed
    2 Tbsps canola oil
    salt and pepper
    2 cups halved cherry tomatoes
    1 small red bell pepper, finely chopped
    4 scallions, finely chopped
    2 cups arugula
    Dressing

    Preheat grill or broiler to medium heat. Rub corn with canola oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill or broil corn for 7 minutes or until ears are lightly browned. Remove from grill and allow to cool. Remove kernels from cobs and place in large bowl with cherry tomatoes, red bell pepper, scallions and arugula. Toss with dressing and serve at room temp.

    Dressing:

    3 Tbsps cider or rice vinegar
    3 Tbsps grapeseed oil
    1 tsp onion powder
    1/2 tsp garlic powder
    zest of half medium size lemon
    dash of salt
    1/4 tsp black pepper
    splash of Wishbone Italian dressing (my contribution!)

    Make dressing. Use some of it and blend (to taste) with Wishbone Italian dressing.