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wren_garden

Pink or Purple, which is it?

wren_garden
14 years ago

HELP! I am being driven crazy. The plan is to have a prominent bed of all shades of purples, bl lavenders and near wt's with purple or bl lavender eyes. I see a DL on a nursery site and fall in love with it. Then, it is shown on another site or Tinker's with a definite pink cast to it. Is it a soil thing like Hydrangea's. If there is acid you get blues, if it is base you get pink's? My Hydrangea's are pink. Am I doomed to loosing the blue tones in any purples and lavenders? This is my list, anyone grow any of these. Purple blue or purple pink? CELESTIAL SHOWERS, UNIQUE PURPLE, ISLE OF DREAMS, POPOL VUH, LIGHT YEARS AWAY, MOONLIGHT ORCHID, SILOAM TEE TINY.The mercy of Pictures would be greatfuly poured over my fevered brow. Thank you Elizabeth

Comments (13)

  • bloomincrazy
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Hi there,
    I have Light years away and S. tee tiny.
    S. Tee Tiny is definately 2 shades of purple, Light years away is absoloutly pink. Pretty, but pink. Having said that, Our house sits on limestone....so my hydrangea's are pink also.
    Hope that helps.

  • lynxe
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    POPOL VUH is a Hanson purple. MOONLIGHT LAVENDER is in fact a lavender with blue tone. It's true that photographing purple daylilies seems fraught with problems, as many cameras seem to record the color as much bluer or more purple than the plants actually are. My suggestion is: after you've seen images of plants you might want, go to the AHS database or Tinker's database and read the plants' descriptions for color. That should help, but even then, you may want to seek out multiple images for comparison. The problem, as I see it, is that many daylilies registered as "purple" do in fact look reddish or pinkish (to me at least). Hybridizers aren't trying to fool anyone; I do believe it's a combination of (1) colors changing depending on soil pH and (2) one's definition of purple.

    Speaking of POPOL VUH, it's on my list. Saw it at a display garden and will be getting it this month. It's quite beautiful. I'll be adding other Hanson purples to the order as well (saw them in bloom so I know their colors): EARTH MUSIC ("violet purple blend"), CATCH THE WIND ("orchid lilac blend with soft lilac watermark"), MASK AND METAPHOR ("lavender blend with violet band"), UTOPIA OR OBLIVION ("violet purple"), VOICES IN FOG ("lavender blend").

    From other sources, I'm getting: Hanson's SWALLOW TAIL KITE ("orchid blend with lavender watermark), ODDS AND ENDS ("lavender violet blend"), WIND IN THE RIGGING ("clear orchid lavender self"), and, probably, SELF DETERMINATION ("purple lavender blend with slate watermark" -- Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous) and BLACK FALCON RITUAL (dark: a "black purple blend with light purple watermark"). Oh - also UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLE.

    Here are other purples I saw in bloom in a region 3/zone 6 garden that I recommend very much for their colors; in fact, I had each one on my list for color alone (I am shopping for purples this year, among other colors) and will get some of them one of these days (but will also be considering factors like branching/bud count/etc. when culling the list) --

    JOSHUA SLOCUM (Hanson 2004). "Orchid lavender blend with blue violet watermark." Wasn't for sale where I saw it. I must get this one!

    RING THE BELLS OF HEAVEN (Carpenter 2006). "Lavender bicolor with lighter lavender watermark and yellow green edge." Whoa....!

    FUN FLING -- by Frank Childs, an early purple self -- but it was blooming at midseason when I saw it

    LILTING LAVENDER (Childs 1973). "Lavender self." Lovely.

    CARMEN RENEE (Apps 2006). "Cream yellow lavender blend." You will have difficulty finding this one; I think it is very nice....and much better than any photos you may find. If the garden gods are good to me, I might even have this one on Saturday.

    GRACELAND (Morss oldie -- 1987) but also in bloom in July; a hardy evergreen. Not a modern form, but a very pretty pale one ("lavender, cream and chartreuse polychrome edged with gold"). I will probably get it one day, or something like it, just because I liked it.

    LAVENDER BLUE BABY (Carpenter 1996). The diploid one is not expensive and trust me, you really "need" this one. :)

    DOYLE PIERCE (Smith 2004). "Lavender with blue watermark and blue gold double edge." Wasn't for sale where I saw it unfortunately. Just beautiful....another one you "need" to add some day.

    MAGIC AMETHYST (Stamile 1996). A dormant "amethyst lavender blend." Really pretty!

    MARTHA'S MEMORIES (Herr 2003). "Orchid with darker eye." In the past, I passed up the chance to get that one because I didn't like the photos I'd seen but subsequently really liked it in the garden I visited. Highly likely I will get it if not this year then soon.

    LAVENDER FAUX PA (Apps 2006). "Lavender with light violet band."

    SHAKA ZULU (Moldovan 1992) "Dark grape purple with white edging and pale watermark." Maybe you'd find it too reddish?

    TRANSCENDENT ARTISTRY (Apps 1996) "white violet blend edged with a white border." Perhaps a tad too reddish, but I'm not sure.

    INDIAN GIVER (Ferguson 1991) "purple with lavender edge and medium purple watermark." Always very popular and not expensive; where I saw it, it was out in a bed with other oldies in a field.

    Purples & lavenders in my garden that I recommend you look for:

    STRUTTER'S BALL (Moldovan 1984) "black purple." Many will say it's still the best purple out there.

    MADAME ROYALE (Apps 2004) "deep lavender self" - this is a stunning true lavender. Also, quite fertile.

    COOL MOON RISING (J. Pryor 2002) - "purple with darker eye and edge." (There is also the very similar intro of hers, MOUNTAIN LACE.)

    INTENT ON CHIVALRY (Pryor 2004) - "purple with darker watermark and eye"

    LAVENDER MINUTIA (Apps 1995) "lavender with slightly deeper lavender band." A beautiful color, but I recommend this plant for color only, as it doesn't have good branching or bud count (for me, at least).

    JOLLY GOOD FELLOW (Herr 2004) "burgundy lavender self." One of my very favorites, but hard to find, still not inexpensive and, perhaps, too red for you. I will be voting for this one on the Popularity Poll. You've heard people say a daylily will always be in their garden? Well, that's what I think about JGF. Just love it.

    I know I have other purples & lavenders, but these are coming to mind. Two northern hybridizers who do great purples are Curt Hanson and the late Steve Moldovan. Seek out their plants! And don't forget Richard Norris, who has MARY LIGHTFINE and MARY'S BABY. For small ones, seek out hardy things by Grace Stamile and Elizabeth Salter. Also, see what Lambertson intros are hardy in your area -- I have several, and they are just stunning. Also, look for ones by Jack Carpenter that will do well for you, as he has some real beauties. Also, the late Frank Childs!

    And don't forget that there are many daylilies in yellows or creams with purple eyes or bands. They are lovely and could add something to your garden. One I saw and liked very much is Pat Stamile's EXOTIC ETCHING, a cream with fucshia patterned eye.

    If you want to add a cream to the list, most highly recommended: MOUNT ECHO SUNRISE, by Ned Roberts. I had to add this one to my order. One word, "wow."

    Speaking of tall pale things for back of your border, consider Jamie Gossard's HEAVENLY ANGEL ICE (!) or his not dissimiilar POLAR BEAR EXPRESS.

    I could go on naming daylilies til the cows come home.....and I haven't even checked my MANY pictures in my picture files....ain't daylilies fun!

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  • lynxe
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    How could I have forgotten? I just got Brian Mahieu's ORCHID VISITATION, a tall "orchid pink." You probably won't want this one, but I think you should look at the plants he's introduced. They'll be tall, so perfect for the back of your border.

    Another northern hybridizer: Darlyn Wilkinson. I have her GREYWOODS TOOTHACHE PURPLE, another one I highly recommend.

    I am stopping now, or I might drive both of us nuts with the thought of all the plants we "need." And I'm also shopping for reds, raspberriees, and pinks! Hoo boy!

  • wren_garden
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Lynxe, Oh, thank you so very much for all the effort. It will be a great help and a whole lot of fun tracking down this new list.It is time to put it all in perspective. The ones on my lists are pretty in form if not the perfect colors. I will be digging a bed on the side of the house this fall 4x15 ft. It is a future seedling bed. Any that don't live up to the hoped for color can be moved there. The whole list of mine above will only be $37 before shipping from South Wind DL farm in their Fall sale. I can take this wonderful list of yours and the other generous members here to start a hunt for Spring. By going ahead with the South Wind order the pressure is off and I can go back to wish lists and dreaming big. LOL. I live in a city with a garden area of 180x8 feet.

  • lynxe
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I'm so glad I can help you. You will have so much fun shopping....just the thought of it makes me want to start rescanning price lists for must-haves that I, well, must have LOL.

    I do have a suggestion: you might want to consider adding one color other than purple/lavender to your bed. Even with the near whites in it, you might find the final effect isn't as interesting as you'd hoped.

    I say this based on my own experience from last year & year before. I was collecting hot colors -- all the yellows, golds, oranges, orange-reds, even melons, apricots, creams plus browns. But instead of having a knock-your-eyes-out brilliant garden, I found it rather boring. This surprised me.

    When I visited the display garden I referred to, I realized where I'd gone wrong....the plants needed some other color either as backdrop (ie, green foliage) or as foil (ie, daylilies in complementary colors).

    Hence my new search this year...

    anyway, if you want a focus on purples, consider adding some yellows. You don't necessarily need many, just a few to make the purples "pop." And to tie in the yellows with the main color scheme, you might also get daylilies that have both yellow & purple in them (like the Stamile that I suggested).

    Alternatively, add perennials or foliage in the complementary color....yellow flowers and/or yellow grasses, for example.

    ....just a thought to consider.

  • hosenemesis
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thanks, lynxe, for the heads up on warm colors. Since I am so lousy at choosing colors, I decided to go with all yellows, oranges, reds, etc. and pulled every purple and blue out of my garden. Hmm. I guess I should be prepared to buy some cool colors this spring.

  • lynxe
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I apologize for two typos in cultivar names. First, MOONLIGHT LAVENDER should have been MOONLIGHT ORCHID. And LAVENDER FAUX PA is actually LAVENDER FAUX PAS.

    hosenemesis, you may have far more success with your hot-colored bed than I did. For one thing, I see you live in SoCal, where the light is undoubtedly different. For another, maybe I am just not very good at putting colors together in the garden LOL. Seriously, on reflection, I think I might have tried adding more reds to the mix to change the proportion of plants with lesser-intensity colors of creams through oranges. That might have worked. Taking this away from the OP, but just a caution: don't combine orange-reds and blue-reds in the same bed....really, I don't think that will work at all.

  • wren_garden
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Lynxe, The purple/lavender Dls are going into a perennial bed with the pink bed to the left, the magenta and white bed to the right and a red Dublin bay climbing rose behind. Silver foliage plants are the blended bridge between the purple and Magenta bed.The next bed after magenta is red and orange. It is really one long whinding bed. Stepping into the garden it starts with melon and whites with some blue, next is yellows white and blues followed by the pink and so on as described above. Foliage plants, sedums, roses, cone flowers, boxwood, gaura, lady's mantle, clematis, shrubs and many others will companion the DLs. The order I am putting in today with South Wind are my first DLs. I couldn't be more excited. Thanks.

  • tjhemmer
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Here is a pic of

    Moonlight Orchid

    Tom

  • shive
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Siloam Tee Tiny here is more of a pink lavender with a dark purple eye. Very cute though. It didn't bloom this year because it's in too much shade, and I couldn't find a photo from past years. Isle Of Dreams should fit very well with your color scheme.

    My most true purples are Promoted To Glory, Orchid Forest and Sapphire Lady. Two true blue lavenders I have are Little Wart and Little Lassie. Hope this helps.

    Debra

  • evonline
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    My soil is very close to a neutral PH. If I buy what are described as "pink" daylilies, the pink always starts appearing cantaloupe colored within a few years. The cantaloupe color is pretty enough, but does not fit with the rest of the colors in my garden.

    I now only buy daylilies that are described as having lavender, orchid, purple, violet or lilac in them. They have remained wonderfully true to the descriptions I've looked at before buying. Our soils are naturally low in phosphorous but I supplement with rock phosphorous to correct that. I live in western Montana.

    I am thrilled with how pretty these violet, etc., daylilies are. I hope they are stable for you.

  • berrytea4me
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Daylilies are a bit trickier than other plants like hydrangea for how they can change color by environmental conditions. DL are not only affected by soil balance but also by things like day/night temperatures & humidity. Flowers on the same plant can vary day by day.

    I have one lavender, 'STORM SURF' that brings out more of its blues with humidity. It tends to be pink-lavender on our typical very hot/dry day but let us get cooler & more humid and the colors, especially the eye zone, come out very lavender/purple. It also fades to light pink by the end of a hot day.

    On the other side I have ROYAL KALEIDOSCOPE which is nearly an identical shade of lavender/purple but it stays true no matter the humidity and it even deepens in color by the end of a hot day.

    Color tone stability during the growing season is not one of those things that is usually listed on a growers website. It is very hard to measure or describe. If at all possible, once you think you have selected your plants, talk to someone near you who grows them to see how they actually perform in your local conditions. Even a visit to a local garden, unless you can frequent it often, can be decieving as you will see flowers on a single day with one single day's weather conditions.

    You may find you have to experiment a bit more than you would with other plants to get just the right ones.

  • wren_garden
    Original Author
    14 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Experiment it is. If they don't work out I know a place for them. My niece and her husband are building a new house and will need a garden. ( do you think it is too much to ask for a corner of her place for a Seedling bed ? LOL) Thanks for the additional DL suggestions. More to look up and plan with. I am pulling out most of the annuals ,today, that were keeping the DL beds safe from weeds in preparation for the South Wind order.For the next 5 mornings it will be major moving days through out the garden for a redesign. The dig fest had to be moved up by 2 weeks as I will have surgery on Aug 28 and won't be able to dig for a while. Clearing out all the newbie bumbles.