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What is your favorite mauve Hybrid Tea?

15 years ago

The mauve color class seems to be a recurring topic here on Gardenweb. These roses are notorious for being difficult to grow yet they possess some of the most unusual colors found within the rose family. Everything from rich imperial purple to ethereal lavender that seems to shine in low light conditions like polished silver. What-is-more the class as a whole is known its fragrance, especially the kind of perfume that causes swooning.

Well, I see that the last great big thread on this topic has dropped off the forum, so I'm reviving it. I must confess that I ADORE mauve Hybrid Teas, especially the lavenders that combine beautifully with pastel pinks and yellows. Ravishingly beautiful flower form along with intense fragrance is of course important but so is vigor and disease resistance (snicker). Is there such a thing as a disease resistant mauve Hybrid Tea? I don't think there is but as rosarians we keeping hoping and wishing.

So describe your favorite mauve Floribundas, Grandifloras and Hybrid Teas. For the sake of staying on topic lets try to avoid the purple/violet Old Garden Roses. I'll start the discussion.

ANGEL FACE (Floribunda, 1968) - Oh the agony and the ectasy! First off the flowers are simply stunning and look great from the high centered bud to the fully open flower. In fact, I think the flowers are at their most beautiful state when fully mature. Petals are ruffled and provide the perfect frame for the golden stamens in the middle. The color is what I like to call true MAUVE; neither lavender nor lilac but a dusky in-between, sometimes tinged magenta ever so slightly along the petal edges. The medium sized flowers are truly ravishing, and like a good Floribunda appear in sprays in all stages bloom from tight bud to full maturity. The intense fragrance is OUT-OF-THIS-WORLD, which won Angel Face the Gamble Award for fragrant roses. Alas the plants are runts. I've tried to grow this rose TWICE and each time ended up shoving pruning it for lack of vigor. Simply put the plant would not get over 2 feet tall. This frustrating Floribunda is capable of literally blooming itself to death. What that means is it blooms at the expense of putting on new growth. Stress it in any way and the pretty rose can perish. One day I might try it again in a pot or buy the climbing sport and train it like a Hybrid Perpetual. Frankly, I have no idea how it does on its own roots.

BLUEBERRY HILL (Floribunda, 1997) - now to be honest I've never actually grown this rose, but I HAVE seen it numerous times (The Botanical Gardens in Norfolk VA has a particularly nice specimen) and each time have been blown away by the overall beautiful of the rose. The medium tall plant is shrubbier than most Floribundas, and when kept on a regular spray routine with fungicides, is nicely clothed with glossy foliage. The flowers are semi-double, which I normally dislike but this cultivar is an exception because the fat, ruffled petals are symmetrical to each other and perfectly placed around the golden center. The color is a decided plus. Soooooo many mauve modern roses have gray, pink, or tan tones that tend to muddy the color. In the case of Blueberry Hill the flower color is clear cool lavender that must be seen to be believed. The one big fault seems to be that BLUEBERRY HILL is notorious for being infected with Rose Mosaic Virus (RMV), which I believe is what is responsible for the widely divergent reports attributed to this rose. In the posts I've read Gardeners report either complete failure or success with this Floribunda. I currently have Blueberry Hill on order for spring delivery with Heirloom Roses, a vendor that specializes in own root virus free roses.

LAGERFELD (Grandiflora, 1986) - to this day Lagerfeld remains my favorite lavender Hybrid Tea because of the superb vigor. Even when defoliated from black spot it continues to stay alive and produce those prissy silvery lavender flowers that this rose is known for. The high centered flower form is very extreme. Buds are actually shaped like sharpened pencils. Some people (we call them exhibitors) absolutely adore the extreme high centered bud. Others dont. Flower color is a pale cool lavender that is completely devoid of any pink tones. The petals have a silky sheen that gives it that "silvery" quality ala the infamous Sterling Silver. The blossoms appear in small sprays on top of long cutting stems. Fragrance is outstanding. Growth habit is tall and upright. Now for the first fault: stems are weak and more often than not "nod" the large flowers downward like a Tea Rose. The high centered flower form also doesnÂt hold throughout the life of the bloom. Fully mature blossoms are rather blousy and messy. Lastly, the foliage is prone to black spot and will completely defoliate unless sprayed regularly with a fungicide. In spite of these faults LAGERFELD remains the easiest to grow mauve modern rose that IÂve tried to date.

STERLING SILVER (Hybrid Tea, 1957) Â Can ANYBODY grow this rose? It was the first rose that I ever tried growing and it was the first rose to die on me. IÂve since attempted to grow it in zones 6 & 7 and it each time ended up in dismal failure. The flowers are truly breathtaking and literally drenched in perfume, but the plant itself withers and perish like some beautiful yet delicate heroine in a tragic opera.

Image of BLUEBERRY HILL by Kayli-Gardener.

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Comments (51)

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I also like Heirloom. Here, it doesn't seem any more BS prone than the other HT's. The blooms are big, abundant and fragrant but don't provide exhibition form.

    {{gwi:203048}}

    Neptune is another fragrant mauve tone with a formal look:

    {{gwi:222035}}

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Isn't it nice to have the eloquent Patrick back in full enablement mode?

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    IIRC, Sterling Silver has always had a notorious reputation for being an uncommonly weak grower for a commercial release, but it was also the very first "lavender" hybrid tea (or at least, the first widely released one). No other hybrid tea release has ever quite matched its stunning color (yes, I'm a fan of that color). I've never grown it and probably never will, but I think the reason it's still available (in spite of all of its very real weaknesses as a garden plant) is that it is still the only one that blooms in that exact shade of lavender. Stainless steel approaches it, but it's not the same, either. Oh, and as an aside. I don't know if it's actually true, but I've read before that the lavender/"gray" roses exist due to the introduction of Rosa foetida into the hybrid tea breeding line (via the Pernettiana roses, if I recall correctly). Apparently those lavender/gray roses also inherited more than a few of foetida's weaknesses (hatred of pruning, extreme susceptibility to black spot, etc.)
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  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I don't post much anymore, but can't resist this one. I consider myself an afficienado (sp?) of the lavendar smellies, and I have the definitive answer for all of you, having tried nearly all of them:

    Charles de Gaulle
    {{gwi:338648}}

    {{gwi:338649}}

    If you can find it, grab it. If you can't, email me and I'll send you cuttings. It's a wonderful rose, that gets a little but not a lot of bs, (unlike so many of the lav./mauve color), smells marvelous, and lasts reasonably well. Trust me - there are very few in this color range that I haven't tried.

    Another good one you never hear much about is the original HT Silver Star by Kordes.

    {{gwi:338650}}

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    How about barbara Striesand? It smells great also!

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I LOVE Blueberry Hill! So far, so good about its health...
    (mine's grafted.) I love it so much that if it were to succumb to RMV I would order it again from Heirloom, ownroot and try again. Patrick, you will love this one. The backs are a deeper purple than the front, and the lovely ruffled edges with the charming stamens keep me photographing this one, over and over.

    I also grow Fragrant Plum and Moonlight Magic and they do
    well for me too....but Blueberry Hill is my favorite.

    Celeste

    BLUEBERRY HILL.....for Patrick

    {{gwi:338651}}

    {{gwi:338652}}

    {{gwi:338653}}

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I love Blue River. I bought it from Palatine this spring and it grew very well and had so many blooms. You'd never guess it was a first year bush. The color is very good and is lavender with light red edges. The only thing it is missing is form as it is more of the fluffy petal form rather than a spiral center.

    I've also got Fragrant Plum, Lagerfeld, and Sandra Renaissance. F.Plum would be perfect if only it bloomed more. Sandra is lovely but slow to rebloom and the JB love this one. Lagerfeld only bloomed twice, and it is vulnerable to rain, humidity, JBs, and all manner of things that ruin the very delicate blooms. But it's great when it does bloom well.

    I'm giving Melody Parfumme more time to evaluate as it didn't do much this year. Paradise did not take well to winter and was just barely hanging on this year. I think I'll try to get it from a better source at some point. I used to have Neptune but both of them died. I didn't replace them because the blooms were usually pink.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I like 'Purple Passion', not for the color, which is a lavender-magenta shade, but for the fragrance, the divine fragrance, which is first rate, like an OGR in power and complexity. I never pass by a 'Purple Passion' bloom without taking a good whiff or two, or three.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    The ones that have lived (killed 3 Angel Face, 1 Heirloom, 1 Intrigue, 1 Purple Tiger, 1 Cologne, 2 Sterling Silver, 1 Stainless Steel, 1 Blue Girl), namely Lagerfeld, Lady X and Neptune. All of them need treatment for blackspot, but no matter.

    Lady X has endured years of neglect (in a too-small pot) and I will attempt to salvage it. If I can't, I'll surely seek out another one, because it has excellent form (even with not so many petals) and a lovely fragrance.

    Neptune, see the other thread. My most robust mauve. Would probably be larger if it was in the ground, but a hulking beast in a pot as it is. Usually in bloom all season, just finished a flush last week. Excellent foliage too!

    Lagerfeld. My baby, 16 years and counting. Moved in with me and will move out with me. Fussy, picky, diva, but I love it.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I have really come to appreciate Barbra Streisand. Like your description of some of the other mauves, it opens completely to gold stamens, which somehow makes it "go" more with my other colors of roses. (it's always frustrating to me when that last small inner petal of a hybrid tea refuses to open) and is very long-lasting in the vase and incredibly fragrant. A little bs but not much.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Very fragrant mauves are one of my big faves. I grow these listed below, and am very happy with all of them. Yeah, some of them have various minor issues, but their pleasures far outweigh their quirks for me in my area. Rated in approximate order of my love for them (I'm doing this from memory, so hopefully I won't forget anyone):

    leila verde (fl)
    heirloom
    charles de gaulle
    barbra streisand
    lagerfeld
    neptune
    stainless steel
    monet
    melody parfumee
    silver star (1966 kordes)
    shocking blue (fl)
    intrigue (fl)
    blue girl
    sterling silver

    I previously grew these, but got rid of them for various reasons:

    blue ribbon
    purple passion
    angel face

    Susan

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I will mention some that I like even though some I lost to that awful Easter freeze of '07. I like Plum Crazy (lost), Shi-Un, The 777 Rose, Blueberry Hill, Silverado, Chantilly Lace, Paradise, Lady X (lost), Simply Marvelous, Old Port, Sterling Silver, Enchanted Evening, Ebb Tide, News (since I moved it to a better spot), Fragrant Plum (not in good shape), Barbara Streisand (not in good shape), Charles de Gaulle, and can I mention The Prince (not classified as an OGR)? These on this list had little, if any, blackspot when I added Messenger to my spraying.

    Others that I have are still struggling after that freeze, but coming back. I believe that their disease resistance was badly weakened from that freeze. These are Melody Parfumee, Heirloom, Midnight Blue, Shocking Blue, Macho Man, and Blue Bayou.

    I do not care for Purple Heart, a basically do nothing to begin with rose. It will probably be gone.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Yves Piaget even if it occasionally gets B.S.
    {{gwi:338654}}From Rose Forum photos

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I Love Paradise
    {{gwi:338655}}

    {{gwi:338656}}

    and a new one for me Nicole Carol Miller smells really good!:)

    {{gwi:338657}}

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    While living in FL I grew Royal Amythist for years. My 2 bushs were on Dr. Huey and I grew them in 25 gal pots with good soil. For me it was a fantastic rose from November thru May. During the hot, humid summers it almost looked like one of it's parents, Angel Face. I'll be ordering a couple more this spring for my new garden up here in GA. Fragrant Plum is also a great mauve. A little slow on repeat, but the blooms are worth the wait. Stainless Steel is a lighter mauve that grows and blooms a lot like Mr Lincoln. The blooms last a LOT longer then Mr Lincoln. Angel Face is by far the best mauve florabunda I have ever grown. On fortuniana root stock it grows like a weed and blooms non stop.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Nicole Carole Miller is doing great for me. Color and fragrance are wonderful. It is a strong healthy plant. I bought a very healthy Angel Face this spring, determined to baby it and make it thrive. It is growing well and healthy and bloomed lots this summer. I am now trying, in newly ordered bands, Nimbus, Royal Air Force, Twilight Zone. I have Ripples, which is still a young band, and like the color very much. Lost Magenta but plan to replace it. Bought Simply Marvelous on sale in the spring and the plant has been healthy and I like the blooms. Got the Buck Silver Shadows - new plant, still growing. Blooms are a very light white/mauve but it is pretty. I lost a Blueberry Hill but Patrick has enabled me to go get it from Heirloom. What's one more rose, right?
    Judith

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Patrick has enabled me to go get it from Heirloom.
    There is nothing more to say... ;-))

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Seems like there are a lot of mauve lovers on the forum. Can't say that I blame them. I especially adore the clear lavenders. You just don't see this color among the Old Garden Roses, or if you do it only lasts a day as the color fades out to slate-gray. I also have three more modern roses to report on so without further delay:

    FLORENCE DELATTRE (Shrub, 1991) - I'm always on the lookout for mauve colored roses with Old Garden Rose flower form and this cultivar appeared to fit the bill nicely. I even broke down and bought her grafted (see below). All I got to say is that when the color was lilac/lavender the rose was very beautiful, but when it took on tan tones ... YUCK!!! She also turned out to be black spot prone so I performed a mercy killing.

    MAGENTA (Floribunda, 1954) - Another mauve "reproduction" rose. Alas she was miserable as an own root plant. Maybe it was the root competition from the companion plants or the shade from the nearby birch tree. All I know is that after three years the plant was no bigger than when it arrived from Uncommon Roses. So she got ripped out like a weed and thrown in the trash. Three years is a lot of time, and it is ALL that I will give an own root plant to show some improvement.

    BTW, I don't "do" grafted roses. Kinda like I don't "do" once blooming antiques.

    TAISCHA (Grandiflora, 1986) - This rose is really only rated for zones 7 and warmer but I thought I'd try some zone pushing. The flower is absolutely magnificent, enough to break your heart. It is lilac-pink and crammed full of petals just like some of those extra full Tea roses but being a Hybrid Tea the stems are stronger and hold the flower straight up. The intense fragrance smells just like Sterling Silver. Positively addicting. B-U-T she only gave me a few of those beautiful blooms, which after 3 years wasn't enough to inspire devotion. I REALLY wanted this rose to do well, but like Magenta, she refused to get over 1 foot tall. So I replaced her with PRETTY JESSICA and have never looked back.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I was hoping that someone would mention another mauve that is due to come out next year from J&P, the grandiflora Sweetness. J&P has a nice blurb and picture of it (what else would they have of course). And it is being sold OWN ROOT so I presume vigor is good.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I love Silverado and Mamy Blue
    I posted this pic before

    {{gwi:338658}}

    Mamy Blue

    {{gwi:338659}}

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Maryl,

    SWEETNESS is brand new so I doubt too many people have any experience growing it. The pedigree IS promising though. The seed parent is MELODY PARFUMEE and the pollen parent is an unnamed seedling of LAGERFELD x SHOCKING BLUE. Both Melody Parfumee and Lagerfeld are known for their vigor (if not disease resistance). MP in particular receives many positive reports here on the forum and is one of the more highly rated mauve modern roses by the American Rose Society (ARS).

    BTW, I've pretty much given up on MAMY BLUE. Here is what Ashdowne Roses had to say about it at their Rose Library.

    "We cannot propagate this rose. While we have a mother plant of this rose we cannot propagate it at this time because it is a plant we have trouble propagating or we feel it should be grown as a budded plant."

    I don't DO grafted roses.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Angel Face, Angel Face, and Angel FAce...I plant her every year lol. Tried Sandra Renaissance but yard people stepped on her. Mamy Blue looks gorgeous!

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Patrick Late Spring here and this week has seen the spring flush at its best. On my garden "inspection" this morning I could only admire Blueberry Hill one of my great performers over the last 3-4 years. With lack of spring rain and horrendous water restrictions it hasn't been as prolific as some other years but the quality of the blooms has been fine. I took these snaps an hour ago.
    p.s. by the way Molineux is blooming its head off! Superb rose.

    Brenton

    {{gwi:338661}}

    B.H's next door neighbour is Grace,one of David Austin's more recent Australian releases. Given as a freebee with my last rose order. A great little border rose. I think they make ideal companions.

    {{gwi:338662}}

    One feature I really like about Blueberry Hill that's rarely mentioned is the contrast in colour between the unfurled bud and the open bloom. Most attractive IMHO.

    {{gwi:338663}}

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    There's lots of good mauves....
    Here's a few....

    AZURE SEA
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    BLUE MOON
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    BLUE SKIES
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    CHANTILLY LACE
    {{gwi:338667}}

    CHARLES DE GAULLE
    {{gwi:338668}}

    DOUBLE FEATURE
    {{gwi:338669}}

    ENCHANTED EVENING
    {{gwi:338670}}

    FRAGRANT PLUM
    {{gwi:338671}}

    HEATHER
    {{gwi:338672}}

    LADY X
    {{gwi:309725}}

    LAGERFELD
    {{gwi:338674}}

    LAVANDE
    {{gwi:335066}}

    LEILA VERDE
    {{gwi:324999}}

    LILAC TIME
    {{gwi:338677}}

    MACHO MAN
    {{gwi:338679}}

    MELODY PARFUMEE
    {{gwi:338680}}

    MONET
    {{gwi:338681}}

    NEPTUNE
    {{gwi:338682}}

    PARADISE
    {{gwi:338683}}

    ROYAL AMETHYST
    {{gwi:338684}}

    SCANDIA
    {{gwi:338685}}

    SHI-UN
    {{gwi:338686}}

    SWEETNESS
    {{gwi:338687}}

    TARDE GRIS
    {{gwi:338688}}

    WILD BLUE YONDER
    {{gwi:338689}}

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    All the pictures in this discussion chain are gorgeous. Beth of NorCA, are all the photos from your own garden?! Can you please tell me anything about Blue Moon? (I read some comments about its blooms being brown on the edges.) I bought BM very late in the season as a bare root. It has vigorously produced foliage and buds in the 30-45 days. However, I don't think I will get see any of the buds open this year. It is supposed to snow in my area next week.
    Thanks for any info!

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    When I lived in Sacramento (USDA 9), I loved my Sterling Silver. Although by no means the most robust rose in my garden, it did last for about 15 years.

    Here at Lake Tahoe, although it is not super cold, we have a freeze-thaw cycle most days for many months, which is a challenge for many roses. I am on the waiting list at Hortico for Hansa Park, a 1994 shrub from Kordes. I've listed a link below.

    Kay

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    My two cents. Angel Face, although a floribunda, is in heaven here. It has flush after flush and never tires. Needs lots of food and water and remains in my hottest location.
    {{gwi:338692}}

    Silver Star blooms ALOT. It prefers our cooler times of year but keeps going in the heat. No scent, alas.
    {{gwi:338695}}


    I grow Fragrant Plum in a less sunny location and it grows hugely tall and lanky and seems to fade fast in the sun. I can't even see the blooms at some point, although it has lots. I wonder how it does in a good,sunny spot.

    I really disliked the chalky color of Purple Passion and Melody Parfumee and both had to go. PP was a great grower, too.
    Purple Passion:
    {{gwi:338697}}

    Kathy

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    My favorites are:
    Angel Face
    Fragrant Plum
    Neptune
    Enchanted Evening (new this year...GREAT)

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Stephens' Big Purple. The secent on that one is amazing.

    Ruth

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Who knew there were so many Mauve/lavenders that people liked. Of course Beth I knew you'd have the new one Sweetness (LOL). Hard to get one over on you.....I admit I'm a big fan of Angel Face, so Silverado and Paradise with their red edges (which AF has sometimes)really appeal to me. Can someone tell me the difference between their performance. I've looked them up on HMF so know that Silverado has Angel Face in its heritage and is rated more cold hardy. But what about repeat, fading, disease resistance?

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Just an off message comment on how different things can be. I ADORE my Angel Face, but it drives me crazy because it gets so BIG....The blooms are so high up that I can't see them well. They are so georgeous. Anyway, how funny that roses can be so different for different people in different places. Mine is in a big pot, and of course I have mild winters and hot summers (which it doesn't seem to mind at all)

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Oh! all the pictures of the mauves are just lovely, I forgot about wild blue yonder, I fell in love with it at Regans last year , got a pic if is so ruffley! and a ton of flowers. , I had azure sea but it was mismarked, so I ordered a new one from Wisconsin Roses I'm very excited to see how this one does, I would love to have mammy blue and silverdo, Paradise was from a body bag this year and once it got going it was like it was on steroids. I have double feature which has a yellow reverse and ruffled very striking! , no good pics of it this year , due to move.

    {{gwi:338699}}

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I wasn't gonna make another post to correct the ones I forgot from my previous list, but Ruth's mention of (Stephen's) Big Purple made me want to post again. Big Purple is one of my top purple fragrant faves. The other ones I forgot to mention are Ebb Tide and Midnight Blue. And if we're doing Austins, I'd include The Prince and Prospero. Do note that there are two very different Silver Stars. The original from Kordes in 1966 is ultra-fragrant, and the more recent one is not. I grow both, and they're both nice roses, but quite different.

    Susan

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    STEPHEN'S BIG PURPLE is a lovely rose, but I wouldn't exactly call it "mauve." It's more of a fuchsia in my climate. And it gets powdery mildew in the early spring. Not one of my better roses.

    Jmac, BLUE MOON does often get the brownish edges. But I don't spray, and we've had a LOT of thrips the last couple of yrs. Many of my roses have had the brown edges because of the thrips. And the lavenders, whites and yellows seem to be the most susceptible. But BLUE MOON is a pretty decent rose for me. Blooms fairly well and has good color. Unfortunately, I don't remember the scent on it.

    Maryl, SWEETNESS was one of the test roses I got two yrs ago from J&P's test panel. It's actually been a pretty nice rose. I can't remember if it has any scent either. But it blooms fairly well and makes a nice full bush of about 4ft x 3ft.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Ditto what Beth said about Stephen's Big Purple, should be renamed Stephen's Big (Spotty and Stingy) Fuchsia.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I used to have Stephen's Big Purple at my other house. It was certainly fragrant, but I thought it should have been called Stephen's Big Raspberries because it was more raspberry in color. It was only purple in certain weather conditions.

    Mary1, I have Silverado and Paradise. Both have been trying to make a comeback after that horrid Easter freeze of '07. Flower quality was not real good this year, but since I added Messenger to my sprays, they have been healthy with little, if any, blackspot. I'll have to see how well they do next year as to flower quality. Many of my plants are just not up to what they were prior to that freeze. It just showed up in poorer flower quality and more blackspot susceptibility this year.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Thanks for the info on Paradise vs Silverado. Would be interested in any differences you spot this next growing season. I personally remember that freeze. Affected many of our plants too. Then last Dec. we had the terrible ice storm that broke and destroyed large numbers of established trees (and left us without power for a very long and cold week). Hopefully all of us will have a better winter/spring 2008/2009.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I like Neptune. It is very healthy for me. It gets bs, but maybe less frequently than many of my other HTs. It smell really good too!

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I was going through the Vintage rose list and found Amy Vanderbilt. It seems really few people grow it so I thought I'd let you know. I have no experience with it myself.
    Masha

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I found this thread when looking for something totally unrelated but it brought to mind a "problem" that I am having with my Blueberry Hill. Actually, I don't know if it is actually a problem but I'd like to post some pictures and see if anyone can tell me why my plant is looking faded on half of it and not on the other half. The non faded half also seems a little more vigorous.
    (this is a small plant that I received from RU about 6 weeks ago and appears very healthy in spite of the weird coloration)
    {{gwi:338702}}
    {{gwi:338705}}

    I have had other plants do this and never knew what it was.

    Also, in the thread above, several people mention having a more vigorous Angel Face on Fortuniana rootstock.....where can you get such a one? Any online vendors?

    Thanks!

    Lynn

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Lynn, the cane with yellow foliage is showing iron deficiency symptoms. Since the new growth on the other side is normal, there is probably something wrong with the cane that is reducing the uptake of nutrients-- a stem canker or something. But normally, the treatment is sulfur to acidify the soil plus an iron product for temporary relief.

    Ugh, this thread stirs up bad memories. 'Shocking Blue,' which turned a disgusting brown. Four 'Angel Face' shovel-pruned successively in the attempt to find an unvirused and vigorous one that would grow in this climate.

    'Blueberry Hill' is not bad. Mine has never shown virus symptoms.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I was not sure just exactly what constitutes "mauve", so I went to Wikipedia: "Mauve (French form of Malva, "mallow"; IPA: /moʊv/, rhymes with "grove"[1]) is a pale lavender-lilac color, one of many in the range of purples. Mauve is more grey and more blue than a pale tint of magenta would be. Many pale wildflowers called "blue" are actually mauve. Sometimes mauve can be considered a dirty pink or a shade of purple."

    So, with that clarification, I'd like to volunteer "Aloha" as my favorite mauve(?) hybrid tea. For me, it is disease resistant, has a good fragrance, nice flower shape & repeats.

  • 15 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Chrysler imperial. It looks like a dark mauve color here to me. It's very pretty

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I'm reviving this thread because one of my mauve "experiments" has a single bloom on it that should be open by the time I get home today. The rose in question is INTERMEZZO (Floribunda, 1963) from Vintage gardens. It's blossoms are supposed to have Old Garden Rose flower form. We shall see.

    Strangely I never received BLUEBERRY HILL from Heirloom Roses. Apparently the order got lost "in the ether".

    BTW, earlier this year I saw WILD BLUE YONDER. Another lavender Floribunda with ruffled petals. Definitely one to consider once it becomes available own root.

    Tomorrow I'll let you know more about INTERMEZZO.

    Best wishes,

    Patrick

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    The bloom opened. Pretty flower: loosely quartered (similar to Comte de Chambord), lightly fragrant, and clear lilac*. Good, strong stem. The color and fragance was disappointing but this is a first year own root plant. I'll give it another year or two for the plant to mature before making a final judgment. The plant itself is still tiny, but bigger than four other own roots in the same pot ghetto. Only the Bourbon DUEL DE DR. REYNAUD is bigger, and it is a climber. It is also one of the few babies that has foliage. I don't spray the roses in my pot ghetto because I want to be able to accurately access their black spot resistance before planting. You'd be surprised at how many of the babies never make it into the beds.

    * I define lilac as lavender with a noticeable pink undertone.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I grow few Hybrid Teas but have Heirloom in a pot in the shade and wouldn't be without it.

    Elaine enabled me with Simply Marvelous, raving about how wonderful it is. It didn't do much in the main rose area but in the shade that puppy came to life. It gets about 2-3 hours a day. It lives in the shade with Angel Face (both on fortuniana and about 6' tall with lots hacked off each year). Mauve roses in the shade are great in Florida.
    Nancy

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    This summer I found Blue Parfum and bought two of them. I have had this rose twice before, but it is the first time in this garden. So far it grows well and have formed 5 buds that hopefully will unfold in September. This rose is one of my favorites. It's a Tantau rose from 1978, we are both the same age. Flowers are large, lots of petals, perfect shape and lots of fragrance. I don't have any other hybrid tea, only these two plants. I know it needs extra care in ever way to grow well and stay healthy. I usually don't spray my roses, but in a crisis I will use neem. I feed with liquid seaweed and all purpose organic fertilizer (pellets). For difficult roses I go for extra applications of liquid fertilizer, lots of kalium and not too much nitrogen.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    I thought the name "Intermezzo" sounded familiar so I looked in my Vintage book and I had a pencil mark next to it. I must have had it on The List but for whatever reason, didn't get it (was it perhaps only available custom root?).

    I am always on the lookout for a good mauve rose to add to my small collection of Angel Face, Blueberry Hill, Ripples, Magenta, Stainless Steel, Blue Skies and others.

    Lynn

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Silver Shadows! Comes back every spring, unlike Romanticas. Interesting color, highly fragrant.

  • 14 years ago
    last modified: 9 years ago

    Angel Face followed closely by Barbara Steisand.{{gwi:338707}}

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