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pappu_gw

Need suggestions for a disease resistant, hardy yellow shrub rose

16 years ago

I am thinking of Prairie Harvest, Julia Child, Easy going, Morden sunrise, and blends like strike it rich, Heaven on Earth. It should stand up to the heat and stay upright. I am tired of floppy, weak stemmed bushes that want to hug the ground or need some sort of a support...

This is for a mass planting. Please let me know what you think of the roses above and if you have other suggestions...

Comments (42)

  • 16 years ago

    Folksinger is definitely upright, disease resistant (even here in my zone) and no long vanes thrown so far.

    Check out Arethusa -it is trouble free, very clean, always loaded with buds and flowers. Gorgeous rose and Pickering still has it. Only "problem' that it is apricot/peach, not yellow.

  • 16 years ago

    According to QR, Arethusa is a z8 rose. A China tea. Unless there is another rose with that name.

    Also according to QR (ARS enclopedia of roses) Rugelda is the best yellow rugosa. Quess what a Kordes! There are two other yellow K's. Lichtkonigin Lucia and Leverkusen. The last is a climber so may not meet your needs. But Rugelda ia a beautiful rose its' yellow flowers edged with a red.

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    No spray in USDA Zone 7? Otherwise known as Black Spot Hell. There is one that repeats, has a little bit of fragrance, and is a clear yellow unalloyed by gold or green tones. It is called CAREFREE SUNSHINE (Shrub, William J. Radler, U.S., 1991). Not a cut flower but as a landscape rose is hard to beat. Another option would be REVE D'OR (Tea-Noisette, Claude Ducher, France, 1869). It is an Earthkind Rose recommended for no spray gardens but it more of a buff, apricotty yellow. You are also zone pushing in 7. Now, if you are willing to spray then you have more options. JULIA CHILD, MOLINEUX, GOLD MEDAL, CHARLOTTE, and THE PILGRIM are my top picks. Of these, the best is Julia Child. It has everything and isn't fazed by summer heat. Does need some spraying or will defoliate by August. I am trying it on an organic spray this year. Will let you guys know how it does in September. My profile pic is a bloom of Julia Child.
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  • 16 years ago

    I can vouch for Prairie Harvest in my Zone 6 garden. It survived our ice storm, a late freeze; and yet came back and bloomed very nicely. Never have to spray it. I find most Buck roses are great for the Midwest.

  • 16 years ago

    Julia Child is an amazing rose. Without spray, water or fertilizer from me she just pumps out the blooms. The roses hold on the bush and the foliage is glossy and beautiful. I just purchased 2 more from RU yesterday.....I LOVE this rose.

    To give you an idea of bush form:

    Julia Child with Sophy's Rose in background
    {{gwi:331603}}

    Julia Child with Country Dancer in foreground
    {{gwi:325265}}

    Close-up:

    {{gwi:232926}}

    Ronda

  • 16 years ago

    Rugelda failed to survive the winter in my garden. But how about Molyneux which not only survived but is flowering on
    an almost constant basis. Julia Child is a very short plant in my garden but it does keep bloomig though not as profusely as Molyneux. And Julia needs winter protection. However, disease resistant foliage on a copact bush.

  • 16 years ago

    Is Julia Child cane hardy in zone 5 or does it die to the ground?

  • 16 years ago

    It never fails, mention a Kordes rose and a negative comment comes from oldroser.

    I'll try another recommend. Bernstein Rose, really a deep yellow almost amber rose. Just planted and it bloomed twice, very profusely for a new rose. Might be too short supposed to be about 3'. BR is a Tantau rose, introduced in 1987 so has survived for 20 years. Dark green glossy foliage. No BS. z5.

  • 16 years ago

    Jim is right Bernstein Rose is a really good golden yellow floribunda. I also really like Harkness "Amber Queen". On HMF there are pictures of this rose even from mass planting in Moscow!!!! Zone 2-3! So it must be pretty hardy! Really good fragrance too. I have also always liked the floribunda Sunsprite.(From Kordes) love the fragrant of this cool yellow rose.

  • 16 years ago

    Other yellow Bucks include April Moon and Winter Sunset. Surprisingly, Graham Thomas survives the winter without protection (with dieback). I will let you know next spring about Jude the Obscure. Molineux survived the first winter and then suddenly croaked in the middle of the summer. Golden Celebration died during the winter, even though the Austin catalog recommends it for cold zones. Another rugosa is Agnes (although it is a once bloomer). Topaz Jewel is also a rugosa hybrid. Then there is the Easy Elegance series...

  • 16 years ago

    Hi;
    There have been a few threads about yellow roses, but none really talk about Marco Polo. I love its fragrance, but know little of its habit or hardiness. Can anyone fill me in?

    Thanks,
    Lara

  • 16 years ago

    Looked up Marco Polo. A Meilland and a couple of medals. Meilland introduces what seem to be great roses. Unfortunately mostly z6 so a risk here. And it's a HT which for me is a sentence of early death. From the pic of it is is a typical HT in form. Kind of messy when open.

    I'm hoping that climate change will for my area make it into z6 and open up a whole new world of possibles!

  • 16 years ago

    I am also looking to do a yellow hedge. I went to the Chicago Botanical Gardens and this is what I saw... Julia Child is lovely but too short for me, Honey Perfume is OK foliage great but the most striking for me was Strike It Rich. They had Carefree Sunshine which I am realy debating because I love that bright yellow but the big blooms on SIR are also bright and cover the bush. I don't know how far you are from the CBG but it is sure worth a trip they had other yellows also. I have to mention another rose that was there even though it is not yellow called Fashion it was one of the most striking covered rose hedge there that day. Just FYI because you are into hedges. Amy

  • 16 years ago

    Morden Sunrise - definitely hardy and disease resistant, but not a true yellow esp. at this time of year. Classed as a "yellow blend" it really is a sunrise mix of colors that vary throughout the year. This is a picture taken this October morning:
    {{gwi:331605}}

    If you don't mind its cheerful blend of yellow, pink and orange, then it's the perfect choice being carefree and almost always in bloom.

    Anne

  • 16 years ago

    I live in the Pacific Northwest and so we see alot of blackspot. I have two large pots with rich soil and red gravel mulch (volcanic rock, naturally red) into which I planted a Julia Child and a Charles Darwin. They are protected against the house, facing south-west. The Julia Child reblooms constantly and the foilage, though not 100% free of blackspot, is glossy and healthy. In contrast, the Charles Darwin is a bit more scraggly, has more black spot and the flowers are a less intense yellow, however they bloom as often and they smell even better than Julia. I have a climbling Golden Showers that seems stunted and puts out few flowers. It gets a lot of sun and water, but has sulked for the two years I have had it.

  • 16 years ago

    OMG, Morden Sunrise disease resistant????? I must be really unlucky because it is by far the most diseased rose in my yard.

    Carefree Sunshine is both hardy and disease resistant in my garden.

    Carefree Sunshine
    {{gwi:331606}}

  • 16 years ago

    I have two Carefree Sunshine and two Perdita. Although both suffer winter dieback, they come back strong after spring pruning. My Perdita is more yellow than the apricot/apricot blend they are advertised to be. It has an upright bushy habit and gets 2 1/2 to 3 feet high in my NW Indiana Garden. I keep it deadheaded and it repeats quite well.
    My Carefree Sunshine is similar with a brighter yellow bloom. It gets taller, not quite so bushy, and throws a very long cane now and then.

  • 16 years ago

    Sorry about your luck, Twohuskies. In my yard, Morden Sunrise *unsprayed* is virtually disease free...and that with being neighbor to several gallicas prone to the creeping crud this time of year. It was unspoken, but "YMMV" always applies to these statements of course.

    AC

  • 16 years ago

    If you have the space, Golden Wings is a beautiful hardy shrub. I grew it in central Ohio without protection and had very little dieback. Have always wanted to grow it again but have been in zone 8 for awhile now & have never seen Golden Wings planted in the South..

  • 16 years ago

    Pappu, did you finaly decide on a rose for a yellow hedge?

  • 16 years ago

    pdxlights, try another showers from a different source. It's an oldie and has been propagated to death. Sometimes it's on sickly roots. If you can get a good one, you will be so happy with it.

    My Charlotte has been well behaved and does not flop but the color is a pale yellow. She blooms more than Jude next door.

  • 16 years ago

    I have seen your photos, Pappu, and I'n guessing you want a strong, bright yellow. Many of the roses mentioned here are pale yellow.

    You might want to give 'Baby Love' a try. That's bright yellow and made for mass planting. Everblooming with bright flowers, though on the small side. Stays to three feet or so. Another great one for you to consider is 'Easy Going.'

    Both of these will die back a bit in your winters, but they are undemanding color pumps.

  • 16 years ago

    It is difficult to find a good yellow rose IMHO. Most are not pure yellow and fade fast; some blow in a couple of days; yet others are disease prone. Julia child is a good rose but it is not upright. In my garden upright yellows (or yellow blends) are Gold Medal, Sunsprite, Valencia, Canary Diamond, Oregold. I have another thorny upright J&P Yellow I forgot its name. Gold Medal is a upright bloom machine, however, it fades fast. I have yet to find a good yellow. I will be watching this post to see what gets most votes.

    -- Roseperson

  • 16 years ago

    John

    Baby Love is one I have on my list. Easy Going on the other hand I passed by as it is less hardy. But it seems to ingore that rating for you. Dies back?

  • 16 years ago

    I looked up Gold Medal on HMF and it is listed at zone 7. With that said the cause of my sudden love for yellow roses was a rose I planted a few years ago that I bought at a hardware store the first year I tried roses. It is Eureka and it is listed at zone 6 and I feel like I would be pressing my luck planting a whole row of them. This rose is so beautiful and full of big blooms that don't blow, don't fade, and have some fragrance, no winter protection for three maybe four winters with only a little die back. A little black spot but the leaves are so dark you barely notice and it does not loose it's leaves. Any way I think the closest I can get without risk of die back is Strike It Rich. I guess my question is could HMF be wrong about the zone or is Eureka in my garden a fluke?

  • 16 years ago

    Jim,

    I have no personal experiance with 'Baby Love' but I've seen it in gardens here and it looks good. The smallish flowers are not to my taste, but it is bright,for sure. Pretty healthy. I do grow 'Livin Easy,' the sport parent of 'Easy Going'. Only one year, so not enough data points for a solid hardiness recommendation. I really like the plant. Extremely healthy for me. Of course, mine are own-root and you prefer otherwise, so your mileage will vary.

    Both shrubs are dieback plants here, to the mulch line in our area.

    I won't be participating any more in this thread. The number of oversized, large pictures took forever to download for me. I don't have the patience to open it again.

    Good luck, Pappu. Let us know what you choose. The rarest rose for cold climate people is the good, yellow rose.

  • 16 years ago

    Oh, Morden Man, Wellbeing and blue delphs--gasp! Too wonderful!

    Drooling. Excuse me.

    Kate

  • 16 years ago

    I WILL be ordering Well Being!!!!! What is the pink climber? Thank you for the enabeling. Amy

  • 16 years ago

    Amy,

    The pink climber is John Davis.

    All,

    I apologize for how the photo's transmitted to this page. They were not this size on the URL where I store them and not quite sure why they are this size here. Perhaps I was not paying attention when i attached them. In any respect, for those of you on dial-up....sorry.

    John W,
    Since i'm not good at hissy cat noises, let me just put it this way, mano et mano, "bite me, big fella."

    Tim

  • 16 years ago

    I don't think I can improve on what has already been said here. A lot of great yellows to consider. A few months ago Kate (dublin bay) suggested to me 'Morning has Broken'. If you are interested in that beauty she might be able to elaborate more on it for you.

    Kate

    Here is a link that might be useful: Morning has Broken on HMF

  • 16 years ago

    Morden Man:

    Can I ask about your great picture above? I know that is 'Strike it Rich' in the middle. What is the rose to the left and right of it? I thought the one on the left might be Double Delight. Beautiful photos by the way.

    Thank you.

    Kate

  • 16 years ago

    I really needed to read this thread before asking a question. Now I see the gorgeous yellow is Well Being, the pink climber is John Davis. Maybe the left one is Double Delight. That should be a lesson to me to take a moment to read before asking.

    Thank you anyway.

    Kate

  • 16 years ago

    Healthy, floriferous, upright bush, mass planting......hmmmm...are you dead set on yellow? Can I interest you with something that's a bit of an unusual colour? Look up Champagne Moment, aka Lion's Fairy Tale. It's a Kordes 2002 introduction, sold through Ashdown's in the US, and Palatine in Canada. It's a floribunda. It's a rose tailor made for continuous blooming. No black spot, but did have a touch of Powdery Mildew while still in the container. Otherwise, it's healthy.

    Can't describe the colour - it's not yellow. It's a blend of pale apricot, with creamy edges. Like champagne with a head of bubbles.

    I have only had this one for one year, so can't vouch for it's longterm health and productivity. But I like what I have seen so far.

  • 16 years ago

    Morden Man - I just want to thank you for the wonderful photos of Well Being. I enjoyed every single one of them and should you want to post more, I would love to take the time to view them all. Unfortunately, some folks still have dial up or slower computers. It can be frustrating.

    Well-Being is a rose that I have long admired -- I love Harkness roses, but mine have had some disease issues, so I have been hesitant to get Well Being. Do you spray?

    Instead, this season I purchased Julia Child. It is wonderful rose, great disease resistancy and continual blooms. But, it just doesn't turn my crank like the rose in your photos.

    Recently, I saw a grouping of Eureka in a sprayed garden and they were glorious -- this is another that I have considered. Well-Being is going to win out though. I just love it and must have it. Thanks so much for sharing and enabling. Happy rosing. CJ

  • 16 years ago

    Thank you all! Tim, you are always the evil enabler. I have beautiful stretches of sweet chariot, champlain, carefree wonder and other roses that you recommended. I guess I have all winter to chew over things...Does well being stand it's color? I want a bold yellow that will match with the rest of my gaudy color scheme..
    Thanks all for your suggestions...please keep them coming..

  • 16 years ago

    Well Being is so beautiful....it must be a BS magnet.

    Soemone please prove me worong.

    LOVE that rose!!

    Ronda

  • 16 years ago

    I have found only one full, brilliant yellow shrub rose in the world hardy to zone 3, goes 6 to 10 feet and that is persiana yellow - once bloomer.

    Of course you will not want it as I suspect it may blackspot your neighborhood, and also as GST wrote it is very difficult to place in the garden due to the shade of yellow. By the way it does not smell like rotting flesh - it smells like Danish oil. I would not be without this rose - does not blackspot for me.

    Tim

    The "big picture and lots" is an old saw from 7 or 8 years ago when telephone modems were it ... John was in the forefront of the arguments.

    You can adjust the width by adding the following after the ending "width=XXX> experiment with XXX but I find 550 to 600 works best preventing page run over. I removed the closing brackets in the equation example.


    img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/helin/Foetida/CeasarandthePersianYellow.jpg"width=600

    with 600

    {{gwi:331616}}

    with 200

    {{gwi:331616}}

  • 16 years ago

    I want a Julia Child too. Pappu, I've thought about Carefree Sunshine also. I have a Ginger something that is a Buck that I like and is a goldish yellow. I grow Perdita and IMHO, it is nowhere near yellow. It is white/peach blend. There are certainly some beautiful photos here for you.

    Good luck
    Carla

  • 16 years ago

    Prairie Harvest is a nice yellow that will die back to the ground and come back vigorously for me every year. No disease, but the thrips love it. In the sun, it will fade to a chalky whitish light yellow.
    There is a new yellow knockout this year, but I don't know much about it. No, I'm not talking about Carefree Sunshine.
    Molineau is a nice yellow that nicely survives my Chicago winter with protection. A good bloomer, with nice fragrance
    Topaz Jewel gets BS and is not as hardy as other Rugosas, but survives in my garden with no protection. Last year, I had to cut it almost to the ground, though. TJ grows at akward angles, so is best to grow in a closely planted group.
    Perdita is pink in my garden. Not at all yellow for me.
    RU sells a yellow sport of Tamora called Lovely Child that has worked well in my garden. Here's a pic
    {{gwi:331617}}
    Julia Child is floppy.
    Strike it Rich isn't really yellow. Think Cantalope. I grew it this year and really like it. Not much fragrance though.
    I have grown Livin Easy and like it a lot, so Easy Going should be a good one.
    Lemon Spice is my favorite Yellow. I protect it and spray it, so it probably doesn't fit your criteria. But, if you want a non stop bloom machine for cutting and sniffing, Lemon Spice is the answer. Gets kind of tall and lanky.
    {{gwi:331618}}
    Jude the Obscure is winter hardy for me with minimal protection, but not really yellow. Apricot. Great smeller, though.
    The only yellow that I have that is disease resistant w/o spraying is Prairie Harvest.
    Al

  • 16 years ago

    Sunny Knockout is being introduced in 2008 by Conard-Pyle Co. It has all the disease resistence of the original Knockout, with similarly dark and attractive foliage, but a more upright habit. It's yellow color will shine in any garden from the Gulf Coast to Canada, and it is hardy to Zone 4. Of course, it is a single, medium to 3 inches, one to five flowers to stem. It is said to be very vigorous, upright, 4 to 4.5'. Sounds like another goodie in the Knockout family. Look into it, if it interests you.

  • 16 years ago

    One word of warning about Sunny Knock Out. My understanding is that it is, at best, light yellow, and it bleaches quickly to creamy white in hot weather.

    That doesn't make it a bad rose--just a very pale one--NOT a rich yellow, if that is what one is looking for.

    Kate

  • 16 years ago

    Thank you SO much for the pics, Mordenman. Well Being is also one of my VERY favorite roses of the 70 we have. It is CONSISTENTLY like your photos. We spray, so I can't say much about disease resistance. It is so unusual and so pretty...often VERY fringy. I feel the same way about Well Being as I feel about Star of the Nile. There's just something very unique about them both.

    Julia Child has been great its first year here. One my husband just LOVES. He doesn't always remark about his favorites.

    We have Strike It Rich coming in the spring from Pickering. I just love glowing colors for the vase!
    Have fun choosing! :0) Phyl