FIND PROFESSIONALS
SHOP BY DEPARTMENT
caflowerluver

Where have all the noodles gone?

caflowerluver
4 months ago

DH went to 5 stores today looking for packaged noodles. Finally found some expensive imported ones. This is the first time we couldn't find an item. I know there are supply chain problems. Have you found it hard to find certain items? How is the noodle situation where you live?

Comments (102)

  • OutsidePlaying
    4 months ago

    I too believe the terms are synonymous. I always referred to the generic term as pasta, but sometimes (rarely really) use noodle when referring to a specific type of long skinny pasta. I just use the term spaghetti, fettucine, or macaroni without tagging on the term noodle. My Italian friend, who practically raised my DD did the same.

    caflowerluver thanked OutsidePlaying
  • foodonastump
    4 months ago

    Trying think when I’d say noodles, aside from Asian foods I’d use it for egg noodles which are in fact noodles and for elbows. I looked at the box and half expected it to say Elbow Noodles as that’s what i grew up calling them.

    caflowerluver thanked foodonastump
  • Related Discussions

    Where have they gone...where have they gone

    Q

    Comments (4)
    Forgot to add, if they are sensible, they are out in their gardens instead of wandering the Web. :)
    ...See More

    Where have all the (female) flowers gone?

    Q

    Comments (11)
    Oh, I think they are very unhappy plants. I have 6 zucchini plants. 4 of them are living in a small kids pool of MG potting mix. Sadly the mix settled since I planted them, so I think they don't have as much soil as they would like. The other 2 are in a larger kiddie pool I bought for my son's pumpkins. I didn't think the pumpkins would live since I was transplanting them, so I filled the pool 1/3 full of dry leaves and the rest of the way with MG garden soil to avoid wasting $ on plants that wouldn't survive. I threw the 2 zucchini plants I had left to transplant into one side of the pool. After I read you guys say that garden soil isn't meant to be planted in without mixing with regular soil I threw some more soil from the yard into the pool and mixed it in the top few inches. The weird thing is that while I wound up with 6 large zucchini plants, the ones in the large pool (leaves and garden soil) are way healthier looking than the ones in the small pool. Apparently more crappy soil is better than less better soil. The cucumbers are actually very happy. I've got them growing in a city pickers box and they seem to be loving the constant supply of water. I originally had 6 cucumbers (3 of straight eight on one side, 3 pickle barrel hybrid on the other) planted in the box and asked you guys what to do about thinning. I built a little trellis in the box and cut out the weakest looking one, which seems to have been a mistake. The two on the side I cut are producing a TON of male and female flowers and the three plants on the other side are only producing male flowers. Oh, and I went an checked out the pumpkin flowers this morning. There were 6 flowers and they were all male.
    ...See More

    Where have all the birds gone?

    Q

    Comments (32)
    I’m so glad to read all the conversation about everone’s thoughts and experiences in each of your own neck of the woods. In the several weeks since my last post, I have slowly noticed changes around my feeders. We now have about a dozen bluebirds who are daily visitors. They began coming even before the recent arctic weather we’ve been experiencing here in the NE lately. Same for the woodpeckers - downy, hairy, and red bellied, and cardinals. Before the cold blast, we had more chickadees than we do now. We had less than a handful of goldfinches, but now their numbers are ever so slowly creeping up. Not too many nuthatches or titmice, but a few that frequent daily. A couple of squirrels have returned. Interestingly, my husband has a friend who feeds squirrels exclusively and his friend said the population of those that are regulars at his house nearly all but disappeared! Also, last week we heard about a gentleman in his 90’s in our town who has fed the birds for over 40 years! He experienced the same mass feeding frenzy near summer’s end that I did, then the complete drop off of any birds to be seen at all. He says he’s never experienced this in all his years of bird feeding that he recalls. We were going through nearly 2x’s the amount of seed than normal, to all of a sudden having seed sit out and basically spoil because it was hardly even touched for weeks on end. With the frigid temperatures, I have noticed an increase in the hawks eyeing our feeder birds. They have been unable to find food in the woods and areas they normally frequent due to a tremendous amount of snow and have, unfortunately, captured some of our unsuspecting feathered friends. They are quite bold, and hard to scare off, which is also unusual. And yes, we also have some feeder birds that seem unbothered by my presence at the feeders while filling them, and don’t fly away til I’m nearly on top of them! This year has certainly been a very interesting year in the local bird world!
    ...See More

    Where Have All the Flowers Gone?

    Q

    Comments (19)
    Maryl - Both Razor Sharp and All of My Love to You have watermarks and some teeth, but I don't think they look alike. Razor Sharp is a much larger sized flower. All of My Love to You is much darker in petal color. But here's a bonus for you. All of My Love to You will survive in a pot during hard winters. Razor Sharp will not. I've never noticed whether All of My Love to you fades much by evening. To tell the truth, it's not one I pay a lot of attention to (except using its pollen). Debra
    ...See More
  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    4 months ago

    "I never heard the term ”pasta” used until the 80’s. It was just the name spaghetti, not spaghetti noodles or spaghetti pasta. Lasagne was the same way. The other shapes of pasta or noodles didn’t show up in the stores until the 90’s."

    You must live away from any large cities :-) The term 'pasta' and a wide variety of pasta shapes and sizes have been commonplace here (large metropolitan area) for nearly as long as I have been cooking! Certainly well before the 90's!!

    caflowerluver thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • nickel_kg
    4 months ago

    My childhood was very "white-bread suburban, middle-middle income level". Never far from large cities (east coast or mid-west), but grocery stores didn't stock the variety (of everything, cheese for example!) we are used to today. So when did pasta shapes start showing up -- I know they were around by the early 90's when my daughter was born. They weren't common in the early 80's when I started shopping for my own self. So sometime in the mid- to late- 80's the explosion of shapes became so common even my area experienced it.

    caflowerluver thanked nickel_kg
  • plllog
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Pasta was an Italian borrow word until the 1970’s or ’80’s. That is, it was in use in the USA but mostly by Italians, italian adjacents, people who had beem to Italy, foodies (back then they'd have called themselves gourmets even if they didn't meet the main definition of that) and snobs. Noodle was the common term in most American homes where there was no Italian influence. Currently, pasta is used for any Italian form, as in, ”What kind of pasta is that?” “Linguini.” and noodle is used for all Asian versions, and people call cous cous, which is a Middle Eastern pasta, a grain, and others call orzo, a rice shaped pasta, “rice” in a way that implies it's a grain also. People I know differentiate it as pasta are shaped and noodles are rolled and cut or stretched and long. Many do say ”lasagna noodles”, which does fit this definition. Pasta just means paste, as in flour plus water. Noodle is from German meaning strip of dried dough. So ”linguini noodles” is correct because they're long and flat strips, and ”linguini pasta” is correct because ”linguini” is Italian for tongues, and no one says tongue noodles the way they say elbow noodles.

    None of which matters. I understand Floral's curiousity about American language, but it's not as if she didn't know what was meant if someone said penne noodles. And most literate Americans know what ”frock” means, but would never normally say it outside of constructions like ”frock coat” or ”defrocked” which have nothing to do with ladies’ dresses.

    caflowerluver thanked plllog
  • chisue
    4 months ago

    To further expand the theme: When and where is it pasta 'sauce' and when is it 'gravy'?

    caflowerluver thanked chisue
  • Lars
    4 months ago

    Pasta (or marinara - the term I use) is called gravy in NYC, especially among Sicilian-Americans there.

    caflowerluver thanked Lars
  • floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    I’m simply interested. This is the only place I get to ’converse’ with Americans and I find the differences in language and customs fascinating. Sorry if my being curious offends anyone. In my defence, my first degree was in linguistics.

    The two words are not interchangeable over here. The usage is as pillog describes. When I read the intial post I thought the topic was Asian cuisine. The reference to De Cecco disabused me of that idea. Hence my question.

    I’ll refrain from commenting on gravy, for fear of upsetting those of delicate sensibilities. And I don’t know when I last heard the word frock. 😉

    caflowerluver thanked floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK
  • functionthenlook
    4 months ago

    Floral, if any one is offended they are way too sensitive. My SIL was from Scotland and moved to the US when she married my BIL. There was plenty of times she had to ask what we were talking about and vice versa. Nobody was offended.

    caflowerluver thanked functionthenlook
  • nickel_kg
    4 months ago

    Floral, our shared language differences can be so fun. So ya'll don't use "frock" much anymore? that's sort of disappointing, it's such a charming word. I heard (well, read) it quite often in the early 2000's on a London music groups forum. People were always saying they needed a new frock (dress), were looking forward to a knee's up (party), chuffed (pleased) about something or other. Oh well, good times (and none of it taken too seriously).

    As far as I know, older Italian-heritage people called tomato sauce "gravy". Maybe someone closer to the action will chime in to say what it's currently called.

    caflowerluver thanked nickel_kg
  • Lars
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    The American language is not uniform throughout the country, and I doubt British English is either, but I've not been to UK personally. I've met British tourists in Europe and Canada, and some of them I can understand better than others. I could not understand the Cockney that I heard in Vancouver BC, and I sometimes turn on English subtitles for movies made in Britain.

    When I moved to San Francisco from Texas, I had a roommate from NYC (who had Sicilian heritage) who spoke much differently than I did, but I had lots of friends from NYC, and he had lots of friends from Texas. He would say things like "I'm going to put up some gravy" that meant he was going to start making marinara sauce, but to me it sounded like he was going to put something away. When he would say "Get outta here," I thought he wanted me to leave. That took the longest for me to get used to.

    caflowerluver thanked Lars
  • lizbeth-gardener
    4 months ago

    I only use the term noodles if talking about an egg noodle or lasagna. If talking about pasta, I usually refer to the specific type: Elbow macaroni, spaghetti, penne, fettuccine, linguini, etc. I use the term pasta when discussing the family of pasta in general, never spaghetti pasta, penne pasta, etc. That would seem redundant to me.

    I have often heard any red sauce/marinari used on pasta called gravy, but the person using the term is usually Italian or raised in an area with an Italian influence.

    caflowerluver thanked lizbeth-gardener
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    "Noodle was the common term in most American homes where there was no Italian influence."

    Is this an example of regional usage differences? This wasn't my experience at all growing up in a West Coast family with no prevailing ethnic practices. "Noodles" were in Chinese food. "Macaroni" was the word for a dish with cheese or a salad of same. Otherwise, Italian-style dishes were called by the name of the shape with no other words used - whether spaghetti, linguine, etc. When my mother made casseroles, she may have said "elbow macaroni". But I never heard the word "noodles".

    As far as "gravy" for tomato sauce, I think this is an affectionate pet name that came into use in Italian-American families to describe what was often Grandma's all-day effort (with everything but the kitchen sink thrown in) in advance of a family meal. Sometimes also called "Sunday Gravy", again, as a pet name. Not referring to gravy, which is something different of course, but "gravy" in the sense of putting it over many types of food. Just as if calling Grandpa's homemade wine "juice".

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • Sherry
    4 months ago

    This morning, no shortage of any pasta or noodles of any kind, but no oyster crackers. I did learn how to make eggs noodles, like for stroganoff, from here, but like Pinkmountain, I will buy unless an emergancy.

    caflowerluver thanked Sherry
  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    4 months ago

    As far as I know, older Italian-heritage people called tomato sauce "gravy". Maybe someone closer to the action will chime in to say what it's currently called.


    As Elmer said, his gravy term is Italian-American. Most Italian-Americans do not speak Italian or have much connection to Italian culture as it exists in Italy. Pasta based dishes are described by the type of pasta, as Elmer points out, and the sauce served with the dish. So linguine (small tongues) with lemon sauce might be served, or perhaps orrichiette (small ears) with broccoli rabe. The generic Italian meat sauce is called a Bolognese sauce (Bologna, home to the oldest University in the world, is known for its meats.)


    caflowerluver thanked Zalco/bring back Sophie!
  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Floral, I found the question interesting too. I thought the poster must have meant to use noodles as a generic term, maybe the way we say maccherone in Italian, IDK. Personally, I never use the term noodles, unless modified by the word egg.

    PS Pasta in Italian refers to dough and comes from the word for paste, which you probably know.

    PPS Ever watch Pasta Grannies? Love them!

    Tried to post video, failed. Here is a link:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCedsqpl7jaIb8BiaUFuC9KQ

  • plllog
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Elmer, there are always exceptions to every generalization.

    What is gravy? A sauce made with pan drippings. Yes, you can substitute other fats and liquid, season it like gravy, and call it gravy because you're pouring it on your food in a gravy way, and that's fine, but the foundation of gravy is not its sauce for the whole plate-ness, but drippings, and the others are extentions of that for their similarity.

    Awhile back after discussions in CF and some online research, I came to the conclusion that the Northeast Italian-origins community calls ithe sauce ”Sunday gravy” or ”red gravy” because it had meat or meat drippings in it, and was sloshed on meat or meatballs as well as in pasta.

    Words aren't absolutes. Different people say things differently. Things catch on, spread, and change. Lacking a word for a new meaning another word conveying the idea is chosen. A belfry is a moveable tower used in battle. When people started putting bells in towers, they looked like, and perhaps were constructed like, belfries, plus the first syllable makes them sound like they should be for bells, so the name stuck long after the war machine was mostly forgotten. 90% of communication, according to the books, is non-verbal. Hence the invention of emoticons in the earliest days of the internet.

    To this day, people make the sauce the way nonna did, with a whole roast simmering away in the pot. Why boil it separately and lose all the goodness in water? The sauce is the braising liquid. The juices from the meat become the drippings in the gravy. Even though it's a cheap, tough piece of meat, it's enough to feed the whole family, tender from the long cook, helped by the acidic tomatoes to break down the connective tissue, and while pasta may stretch a tight budget in a satisfying way, Sunday best means everybody gets meatl

    Someone else's nonna used the water from boiling the meat wa the foundation for the sauce, Others roasted the meat and literally put the drippings in the saucel Some just browned scraps of meat in the pot and left them in. Foods are often some of the first things one learns in a new culture. What's that on the meat and potatos? Gravy. Stir some flour and [liquid] into the pan after you remove the meat and catch all the goodness. [Cool!] Now there's a word for the Subday red sauce.

    caflowerluver thanked plllog
  • Judi
    4 months ago

    For those of you finding a shortage of pasta --- order directly from Delallo.


    https://www.delallo.com/

    caflowerluver thanked Judi
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    I commented because of your sentences "Noodle was the common term in most American homes where there was no Italian influence." and "So ”linguini noodles” is correct ...". I simply said that when and where I grew up (baby boomer), the term "noodle" wasn't used or heard outside of its use for Asian food. Which, at the time, was mostly of Chinese origin.

    The word gravy when used has an unambiguous meaning as to what it broadly is and what it's used for. Neither the ingredients nor process to make is a factor by those who use it, it's like a type of table condiment. It can come out of a can or from a package too. It's specific and not general, just as no one would call their beverage a liquid, as in "pass the liquid please". You can insist it's otherwise if you want.

    My experience is that calling tomato sauces of any kind "gravy" is playful and even self-deprecating in a family or among people of Italian origin, whether cooked all day or out of a bottle. It describes the end result, not the process or ingredients.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago

    And to Zalco's correct comment:

    "PS Pasta in Italian refers to dough and comes from the word for paste, which you probably know."


    In French, it's "pate", likely the same latinate root as Italian.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • caflowerluver
    Original Author
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    We just call them noodles, never egg noodles. As in "Get the package of noodles out of the pantry please." I never even thought about Chinese noodles since we never buy them. And what would you call German Spaetzle? Noodles or pasta?

  • chloebud
    4 months ago

    Just got back from the grocery store. They were completely stocked with egg noodles and pasta.

    caflowerluver thanked chloebud
  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    4 months ago

    I call spaetzle, spaetzle. This conversation is making me hungry. I am so tempted to make some spaetzle ... must. resist.

    caflowerluver thanked Zalco/bring back Sophie!
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Yeah, spaetzle is spaetzle. In Germany or in a German restaurant, you know what it is. If you saw "pasta" on a menu in a restaurant in a German speaking area, expect a dish of Italian influence, likely with some kind of tomato sauce on it.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • vgkg Z-7 Va
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    When I was growing up there was spaghetti and macaroni, "pasta" was only listed on Italian restaurant menus......and noodles were only found in cans of Campbell's soup.

    caflowerluver thanked vgkg Z-7 Va
  • plllog
    4 months ago

    Spaetzle are dumplings.

    caflowerluver thanked plllog
  • salonva
    4 months ago

    I grew up in Brooklyn, and my Italian friends referred to it as sauce for Sunday dinner. As I recall, I only started to hear of gravy when we moved to New Jersey.

    Similar to Sherry, I think I only saw the word pasta on menus.

    We only knew spaghetti and "elbow macaroni". Noodles were the egg noodles.


    Tomato Tomahto


    caflowerluver thanked salonva
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    "Spaetzle are dumplings."

    No, dumplings are knoedel. As in leberknoedel (liver dumplings) or kartoffelknoedel (potato dumplings)

    Spaezle are like large orzo.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • Lars
    4 months ago

    My Italian roommate in SF was born in Manhattan while his parents were living in Little Italy, near The Bowery, which is where he said his father used to hang out. When they could afford it, his family moved to Queens, which is where he grew up, and I believe his grandmother moved there with them. Anyway, he always said "gravy" and never "sauce." Maybe Brooklyn is different from Little Italy.

    His grandmother had a heavy Sicilian accent, but his mother had more of a Brooklyn accent, rather than Queens. Richard, however, sounded like he was from The Bronx, and he did not talk like his mother or grandmother, both of whom I had talked with on the phone.

    caflowerluver thanked Lars
  • Judi
    4 months ago

    When I was growing up there was spaghetti and macaroni, "pasta" was only listed on Italian restaurant menus......and noodles were only found in cans of Campbell's soup.


    No homemade egg noodles? Those were the best!

    caflowerluver thanked Judi
  • plllog
    4 months ago

    I make spaetzle. They are indeed a kind of dumpling. The name isn't dumpling, but the method of making is.

    caflowerluver thanked plllog
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Here's what spaetzle looks like, they're not dumplings but rather small pieces of egg pasta. If your recipe comes out looking differently, then it's something else. Click to enlarge.



    Here are potato dumplings:



    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK
    4 months ago

    It’s a long time since I ate Spaetzle but the one’s I’m familiar with from living in Bavaria were made by extruding a dough through a special Spaetzlepresse straight into boiling liquid. The result was thick worms not balls. German wiki refers to them as ’Nudeln’ ie pasta.

    caflowerluver thanked floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK
  • Lars
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    I think of Spätzle as small dumplings. Some people call them noodles, but more people call them dumplings, from what I have heard.

    Here's another recipe, which calls them "little sparrows."

    caflowerluver thanked Lars
  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    4 months ago

    Spaetzle is referred to online as dumplings by numerous sources (including German ones) but most refer to them both as a soft pasta noodle OR a dumpling. I doubt it is quite so cut and dried as some posters would have us think :-)

    caflowerluver thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    "Thick worms" is a good description. And nudeln is also on the mark, I suspect it's the origin of the English word noodle.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • lily316
    4 months ago

    Here in PA noodles were egg noodles put in soup or a casserole. All others were pasta. Never was sauce called gravy and I never heard that until an Italian friend used the term. I just was cleaning my pantry and threw out four boxes of expired Barilla angel hair pasta. We just don't eat pasta that much. However, I glanced at the pasta aisle at the grocery store and saw it was partially filled, but again for the 10th week in a row, no Fancy Feast. I called the company this week and they were sympathetic and sent me coupons for five purchases. They expire in March and I doubt I'll see FF by then. So cats have been eating Wilderness and still living the good life but they miss their flaked fish and shrimp FF.

    caflowerluver thanked lily316
  • plllog
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Not all dumplings are balls!


    The German nudel is in fact the origin of "noodle". As I said previously, it meant flat, dry strip of dough.

    caflowerluver thanked plllog
  • arkansas girl
    4 months ago

    What I've noticed is that Walmart's pasta/noodle section is always skimpy but if I go to a different store, it is fully stocked. Normally I just go to Walmart because I can get all things and don't have to run to a bunch of different stores since the covid hit. I used to go to several stores to buy my groceries but now it's "in and out nobody gets hurt" for me...HAHA!


    caflowerluver thanked arkansas girl
  • functionthenlook
    4 months ago

    Arkansas I agree, walmart is skimpy on some items normally. The two different walmarts I go to are both skimpy on some basic item. They have a whole isle of all different kinds of candy or 50 million types of frozen pizza, but their spice section is pitiful. Same with the flours, soup base , etc. Aldi's I noticed are heading the same direction since non food items are taking up more shelf space.

    caflowerluver thanked functionthenlook
  • chloebud
    4 months ago

    A little off topic but the mention of dumplings and "thick worms" made me think of something I saw in Fine Cooking yesterday. Anyone heard of "schupfnudeln?" The name is new to me but they're just "...finger-shape potato dumplings from southern Germany and Austria."


    With pot roast and veggies...

    caflowerluver thanked chloebud
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    It appears a difference between pasta/noodles and dumplings is that while the former is made of only a few customary ingredients - flour, water, and sometimes egg, dumplings include these plus other ingredients usually in substantial part and in some cases can be "stuffed", as with Asian dumplings of various kinds.

    One recipe I found for schupfnudeln described it as being a German form of gnocchi, although traditionally cooked by pan frying. The predominant ingredient in Schupfnudeln is potato with only a little flour added to it. Like gnocchi, it would seem because of its ingredients to be not a type of pasta or noodles, the name notwithstanding. Dumpling for both the German and Italian variants seems right.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • jmm1837
    4 months ago

    Noodles can be made of things other than flour - rice or buckwheat for example. And there are certainly types of dumplings which have very few ingredients.  Then we have ravioli, tortellini and agnolotti, all containing multiple ingredients and stuffed, yet normally thought of as pasta.  I think we're getting caught up in meaningless distinctions here.

    caflowerluver thanked jmm1837
  • Elmer J Fudd
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Yes as to rice noodles and a few Italian exceptions that are very pasta like. It doesn't much matter.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • jmm1837
    4 months ago
    last modified: 4 months ago

    Yes as to buckwheat as well (soba noodles are one of my favorites). And yes as well to cellophane noodles made out of things like potato starch. And udon noodles have a very dumpling-like consistency.

    I'm not sure what cooking methodology has to do with it, since dumplings are often cooked the same way as pasta.

    I have always associated the term "pasta" specifically with Italian cuisine and " noodles" with various Asian cuisines, because there are obvious, important differences between those cuisines. I just don't see the same significance in the term "dumpling. " They can be simple or complex, and belong to many cuisines.

    caflowerluver thanked jmm1837
  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    4 months ago

    Chloebud, you are ruining my diet! Those look amazing.

    caflowerluver thanked Zalco/bring back Sophie!
  • seagrass_gw Cape Cod
    4 months ago

    @Lars - that My Drunken Kitchen YouTube video gave me a good laugh! My German is rusty but I loved the word play. Danke schoen.

    caflowerluver thanked seagrass_gw Cape Cod
  • chloebud
    4 months ago

    "One recipe I found for schupfnudeln described it as being a German form of gnocchi..."

    Elmer, that did cross my mind. The ingredients they give for "Basic Schupfnudeln" are russet potatoes, flour, salt, egg yolks and butter.


    "Chloebud, you are ruining my diet! Those look amazing."

    Zalco, they do look tasty! Along with the pot roast recipe (Parsley Schupfnudeln With Red Wine Braised Pot Roast), they include a recipe for Chive-Tarragon Schupfnudeln With Braised Chicken and Spring Veggies.


    caflowerluver thanked chloebud
  • plllog
    4 months ago

    From Merriam-Webster: dumpling: a small mass of dough cooked by boiling or steaming

    caflowerluver thanked plllog
  • CA Kate z9
    4 months ago

    caflowerluver, I haven't looked lately for noodles - or pasta - but I learned to make egg noodles by hand when a small child and can whip up a batch pretty quick, so a darth of those wouldn't present a problem for me.

    In Omaha, Nebraska, in the 50s, we had: noodles; spaghetti; macaroni (for salads); potatoes; and rice; that was it ! I remember a recipe that called for Acini de Pepe when living in Wisconsin in the 70s. I had to hunt for such a pasta in more than a few stores to find it. (Such a wild thing. ) Probably had to go to Old Italy in Milwaukee to find it.

    My German/American Mother occasionally made potato dumplings that were heavenly tasting and shapped like a long, skinny, breakfast sausage. Never did learn to make those because she always made those when alone.

    My DD lived in Berwyn - suburb of Chicago - in the 90's . The Italian/American neighbors always called what they put on their pasta "gravy".

    caflowerluver thanked CA Kate z9