Best way to decrystallize honey?

linnea56 (zone 5b Chicago)

A classmate gave me a HUGE jar of honey. I found out she keeps bees! It's almost fully crystallized, though.


I usually spoon honey into a decorative ceramic jar. I made the jar, so I don't want to heat it.


I've only heated up very small jars of honey before, setting the jar in a pan of simmering water. Getting this big one made me wonder if there is a better way to do it, that I was not aware of. Thanks!

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Lars

I generally microwave it, at medium level, for a few seconds at a time. Otherwise, I just put the jar in a pan of almost boiling water (off heat) and let it sit for a while and stir it occasionally, similar to your method.

The MW option is faster, but you have to make sure that the container does not have any metal.

You can also set the jar in a ceramic container of hot water, and microwave them together.

How big is the jar you have? If it is extremely large, you can transfer it to smaller more manageable containers. I recommend doing this anyway, as large containers are very awkward.

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plllog

Same as Las, really, but if there's even one crystal, it'll all recrystallize soon. I have a bottle of crystallized honey I got tired of dealing with, so I've let it be and use it in cooking as honey sugar. The crystals melt in cooking. You can also just pull out as much as you want to use, like for tea or toast, in a prep bowl or custard cup, and zap that. but for tea, you can just use it crystallized and it'll melt just fine.

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linnea56 (zone 5b Chicago)

The jar is big enough that transferring it to separate, short jars would made a lot of sense. There's no way I could get a spoon even halfway down. But I'd have to liquify it to do that....


I thought I read somewhere that microwaving was bad for honey. Or made it crystallize faster.


It does seem like every time I liquify some, it recrystallizes faster.


It's fine in my tea crystalized. But I like it on grapefruit or in kefir too.

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plllog

The recrystallizing fast is that one crystal thing. If you heat it in a double boiler and stir with a scraper getting everything vlinging to the sides, and dissolving every single crystal, you might just succeed in keeping it liquid for longer but getting every last crystal is almost impossible without standing over it and stirring.

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lindac92

I have read that whipping crystalized honey will make a whipped honey product. Don't know if a hand held electric mixer would do it, or it you would have to put it in the blender.
I currently have a large jar of honey.....so maybe I'll have some first hand experience.

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wednesday morning

It will form crystals again after heating it.

It is still good to use for many things.

Whipped honey? That sounds interesting.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Huge like a half gallon? Can you get anything in the jar to cut or scrape some out? Meaning, is the opening large enough to get some out and put into a pint ball jar.

I want some, 😜. I've never had enough crystalized volume to make creamed honey. I used to know a bit about it. It can be further pulverized and used as 'seed' crystals to 'feed' fresh honey. Making a creamy or spreadable honey. A pint or so would need to be further dehydrated. then blendered to a table sugar consistency. A warmed runny pint added to the blender and whipped.

Or just warm one pint at a time. It usually takes some time to recrystallize. Pour from the glass jar into your homemade. If it crystalizes faster than expected, set into hot tap water for a 1/2 hour a few changes of water will help. I would not microwave as it can scorch and no longer considered 'raw' if that's important to you.

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