Another Q re: fruit storage

jally

Is there some reason i don't see more of the below as household fruit storage containers? Wouldn't they be softer on fruit compared to wire, wood, plastic, mesh, and wicker (with respect to marking & bruising the fruits?

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32372407681.html

OR even this shelf liner: https://i.ebayimg.com/thumbs/images/g/czsAAOSwfWpfAKQD/s-l225.webp

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Lars

I typically do not store fruit for that long.

Recently I dehydrated a bunch of apples and bananas from trees in my back yard, and I find it much more convenient to eat dried fruit. If you dehydrate it yourself, it is much tastier IMO. If I still had a mango tree, I would dehydrate mangoes. I don't know whether I could dehydrate figs in my dehydrator, but I would try, if I still had fig trees.

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lindac92

Those things pictured are for shipping very fragile ripe fruit. No idea how long you are storing your fruit at home but if a wicker basket is a problem, you are probably keeping it too long.

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plllog

I get it about soft fruit. I wouldn't put peaches in my wire fruit bowl. You do want the air circulation. I have a glazed ceramic fruit bowl with a very open weave (i.e., not for grapes and cherries). It's great for all kinds of fruit, and very easy to wash if something goes weird.

The soft lattice you showed, like they use for Asian pears, is lovely, but I don't know that it would be nice for very ripe soft fruit. You can give it a try.

The rubber shelf liner would not be nice directly on food. There's a green version that they sell for lining your crisper. I don't know if it's coated or just colored. If the former, that might be good. I figure anything that makes your hands stink isn't nice for food.

My ceramic bowl was a gift, and I don't know where to find them. I found this one on Amazon. It's pretty ugly, but the same basic idea. It's much better than a solid bowl and rounded works better than flat.

https://www.amazon.com/Modigliani-Italian-Dinnerware-Handmade-Collection/dp/B00Y9GPOL6/ref=sr_1_67_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=ceramic+fruit+bowl&qid=1610433401&sr=8-67-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzTzFRVlUxM1A5REpRJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwMjQ3ODI3MTNPTU05QTlaRFRRNCZlbmNyeXB0ZWRBZElkPUExMDA1MjEwSEk2WjhIRlhaVVpYJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfbXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

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colleenoz

Except that ceramic bowl is less than 5" in diameter :-D

That foam lattice is very environmentally irreponsible IMO.

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Islay Corbel

I dont think it's necessary unless you juggle with your peaches! 😁

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

If I don't want soft, thin-skinned fruits to bruise, I don't stack on top of each other, but spread them out in a single layer. I often use a wide, shallow bowl or colander.

I don't like to cover the fruits so I can't see the skin, because then I can't detect damage or rot until it's too late.

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plllog

Oh, dear! Colleen, I didn't see that! I was searching on fruit bowls and looking at the photo. Mine is about 12"+ in diameter I think. It's big, wide and has a shallow curve.

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jally

I would like to store fruit such as mandarins for longer periods of time, without them either drying out or rotting, because i prefer to buy in quantity when they're on sale.

I think the best for me would be something like the below, in a very soft/washable breathable mesh, for mandarins, bananas, stuff like that.

Except that each compartment should be able to button on and off, so that you can unbutton and wash whichever may have gotten smudged.

Question is, which mesh offers least-bruising and breathability, similar to the aliexpress link in OP.

https://homebnc.com/homeimg/2016/04/48-closet-hanging-shoe-organizer-shoe-holder-homebnc.jpg

So...why just for shoes? Why not something similar for produce?

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plllog

You can keep mandarins in the fridge for a long time. Keep them out until they're fully ripe. I've never found an acceptable way to keep bananas for more than a week.

You could definitely make a pocket curtain for your fruit. Buttons would probably have too much tension on them, especially with mesh. Better to use gripper snaps like for baby clothes, or heavy duty velcro.

An easier choice, however, would be to line the bottom of a tiered wire hanging fruit holder with the Asian pear wrappers you started with. Then you could inexpensively protect your fruit, keep it well aired, and save your creative energies for something less easily solved.

As to what kind of mesh, look at the kind they use for greens bags for anti-plastic people. I tried to like them, but don't. The fabric is strong, however, and still soft.

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Fun2BHere

I think that's why most sailors use fruit hammocks.

Of course, they don't use the stand part.

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Fun2BHere

I have a bread basket similar to this one that works well for fruit.


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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

I do not store citrus out on the counter for longer than a few days - it loses its nutritional value and shrivels up.

I store it in the fridge in produce bags from the grocery store. I just grab a couple extra when shopping and also reuse some.

I have a tangerine tree and have a couple bags of fruit in the fridge now. Oranges are not something I worry about bruising.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Previous discussions here and on a gardening forum, for fruit and vegetable storage, most have decided that what works for some does not work for others. Depends on your climate....kitchen, pantry, garage. A gift box of citrus is in my garage near the interior door. (45ºF) I bring up a few at a time and into the fridge. The few apples, pears, and plums in the fridge on a folded Terry cloth towel single layer.

Climacteric fruits are single layer on the counter so I can watch the ripening.

My kitchen pantry is against an exterior wall and not heated, door closed. 55º-60º.----ish. OK for garlic, onions, potatoes. If a larger quantity is purchased, I keep in the garage. A mesh shoe caddy would work for those in the pantry. I just use shelf baskets.

If I had a large family in and out and about, I might put out some fresh fruit daily like I do for house guests on the breakfast table...what needs consuming and what is ripe and ready.

Climacteric stone fruits are best letting ripen single layer and checking. Non-climacteric like your citrus, are sturdy enough to stack, but do like cooler temps. If your fridge is very dry, best in your crisper drawer separate from other veg. Mine has dividers. Trial and error how individual fridges will extend your fruit/veg life.

I picked up some mesh bags from the produce section of my grocery. They do not work at all for me. Herbs in a glass jar with water, loose bag overtop, does not work for me. Much better is rolling in a damp towel and into a loose bag fridged.

If short on fridge space, fit what you can, but store the remainder in the coldest place in your home. If you need to use an upper shelf, I need to bag mine for extended periods of time but fine for a week or so.


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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

Surprised to see that apples 'ripen' when left at room temp. They just get yucky if I do that here. I definitely refrigerate them to keep them firm and crisp. I hate soft, mealy apples.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Oh, I so agree. I can't find the two articles I wanted to link. One is more textbook and lengthy. I thought I had them bookmarked. It goes deeper into the grey areas. Non climacteric fruits do benefit from harvesting closer to fully ripe. A large commercial farm will pull that harvest date to gain finances way before the optimal time.

Exceptions fall in the middle but due to ethylene/etc they toss them left or right to keep it simple.

Apples are picked in the fall months and kept in cold storage. Then go into distribution though some are terrible right out of the bag. BigAg cares less about flavor. Like watermelon I gave up on a few years ago. (unless the market gives taste testings). The Misfit baby melons were excellent all summer. All the fruit has been excellent. Small farms like we find at local farmers markets are mostly great quality. A smaller farm will focus on their crops getting to us at the right time for fresh flavor.

I have cherries, grapes, berries, pears, apples, etc. It is a dance harvesting at the right time and then proper storage. Grapes and blueberries I can net from the birds but the cherry tree is now enormous and needs a harvest ladder. Every year I miss the timing except for the few branches I sleeve with a half dozen mesh socks. (birds descend as soon as they ripen). A bear loves one of my pear trees. Asian pears like to be harvested ripe. Short shelf life even in cold storage. So I eventually juice them and freeze. Always learning. My Meyer lemon has been flowering for weeks now. I hand pollinate every day....takes about two minutes, as well as my indoor tomatoes. Just read the lemon likes misting indoors....always learning.



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jally

Thanks pillog, sleevendog, etc., etc., for the feedback. The idea of mesh as an inner lining for tiered baskets is intriguing, though i don't know which is best value, and i'd love to see more pics.

When i posted my shoe-organizer pic, i didn't mean precisely that, but rather adapted toward fruit (somehow).

I do similar strategy as sleevendog's garage/fridge duo...

...albeit at my place, its a duo of basement and fridge.

I occasionally buy climacteric's such as peaches/mango's - which I keep inside paper-lunchbags, as i find that the best way for those to ripen. Apples and grapes i always store in my fridge. Ditto watermelon (though officially maybe you're not supposed to). I learned that the official way isn't always the right way for me.

As of right now, i have about 4 mandarins hanging via their original Halo's mesh bag to the handle of an old grandma shop-cart in the coolish basement. (I looped a cotton rope thru the mesh, which in turn is looped onto a plastic "S" hook that's hanging on the shop-cart.

...the remaining 5 mandarins are in another, red-mesh bag inside the fridge near right wall (since the left wall is near the air-vents of the side-by-side fridge.

...i have some green grapes suspended from that same shelf (weeks ago i posted a pic. of my hanging-grapes on houzz.

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