Do you cook with red onions?

olychick

I have quite a few recipes that call for red onions...mostly raw in salads and I always temper them in vinegar before adding to a dish, so I often have them on hand. But tonight I was making a marinara sauce for pasta and the red onion I had was soon to be past its prime, so I decided to use it instead of the Walla Walla sweet that has more life left. I realized that I never cook with red onions, but am not sure why. Do you? Is there a reason not to?

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blubird

I always have red onions but only use them raw. I cook with my yellow onions or shallots. Don’t know why, just do.

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amylou321

I have always gotten red onions if they are going to be raw, like on a cheeseburger or something, because SO prefers them. He says they are sweeter and milder than a yellow or white one. Since its just two of us, I always have leftovers and I will use the leftover onion when I cook something. But if I am buying an onion specifically to cook in something, I usually get a yellow one. I think its a subconscious thing why a lot of people only use them raw. Red onions are always used raw in cooking shows and stuff because they are pretty, and why would you waste such a pretty onion cooked into something that you cant see it in?

To me, an onion is an onion is an onion. They all taste like onion. So yeah, I cook with them.

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foodonastump

I cook with them in a vegetable dish. For example if I’m doing a sauté of a mix of vegetables on hand, I’d reach for the red onion if I have it. It’d feel weird using it in meatloaf or tomato sauce but I would in a pinch, and admit it’s more psychological than anything.

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olychick

Thanks, I guess my instincts are pretty right on...no reason to not use them, but not the first choice for cooking - for no good reason.

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annie1992

I grew both yellow sweet onions and red onions in the garden this year. The red ones did very well so I have a crate of them in the garage and I've been using them for everything from chili to fajitas. I haven't seen any difference.

I don't eat any onions raw because they give me horrible heartburn, but the lady across the street makes a salad with red onions and feta. Yes, that's it, just red onions and feta. I can't even imagine, LOL.

Annie

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olychick

Annie, when I read that about the red onion and feta salad, my mouth watered! Not sure why, but it did.

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lindac92

There ae 2 kinds of red onions....the sweet mild and the "regular"...I really love a slice of sweet red onion on a burger or a tuna sandwich.

Mostly I buy red onions to use raw....but I do cook them with red cabbage.....and I have made a "purple soup" with kidney beans, red cabbage, red onion....ham as a base....and the usual seasonings.
And I have a jar of pickled beets and red onion in the refrigerator right now.

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olychick

I only see red onions of one kind in our markets. How do you discern which they are?

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neely

I would use them in a purple soup but don’t use them in other sauté things where their cooked blueish tinge is a little off putting for me.

Raw.... perfect sweetness.

However, I have been using green onions (Spring onions)) for most things lately including cooked. Sometimes just a slight onion taste is all DH and I seem to like.

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colleenoz

I use them raw in salads, but because they are significantly more expensive than brown/yellow onions which I used to use for cooking, that’s why I don’t cook with them.

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Bumblebeez SC Zone 7

I have some that need to be used up and they are going in a Hungarian round steak and peppers goulash today. The paprika will cover the gray color.

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party_music50

I generally don't use red onions in cooking because of the color/staining, but I do like/use them in fajitas, omelettes, some soups (e.g., not potato. lol!), etc.

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LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

I use them raw most of the time on burgers or in salads. I did use several red onions last weekend when I made a big batch of caramelized onions. No difference that I can tell after 45 minutes.

I also dehydrate them along with white and yellow onions. After grinding down a mixed batch of dried onions I get a unappetizing pink powder but it tastes great!

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eld6161

I was thinking the same as Oly. In my market, the white onions are all sorted, but I usually just see one bin for the reds.

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Lars

It never occurred to me not to cook with them, if that is what I have on hand. I do buy them to use raw, and they are maybe a bit more expensive than some other onions, but I have never hesitated to cook with them.

I sometimes make refrigerator pickles with red onions.

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Jinx

I use them for my broccoli/tortellini salad, and sometimes on burgers. Otherwise, I prefer sweet yellow onions (Vidalias are my favorite) in my recipes. For me, it’s just a taste thing.

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beesneeds

I tend to prefer them over yellow or white onions for raw use. But yep, I use them all over in cooking too. And the are the only choice when I can up a few jars of sweet & sour onions- the final product just wouldn't taste the same or be that pretty pink color if I used something else.

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l pinkmountain

I think it might be a color issue in cooking, (they bleed a slightly purple dye that turns grey as it oxidizes) but you have to use quite a few before it gets really, really noticeable. They are more expensive than yellow onions so I only use them when their color is a plus. I have used them in tomato based soups, roasted vegetable mixes, and other times when I needed an onion and that was all I had. I tend to use them more for raw dishes that benefit from their color.

As a side note, the color change is in response to pH and temperature, the solution in which you are cooking the vegetables influences the level of color change. That's why folks add cider vinegar to braised cabbage and why tomato soup accepts red cabbage without as much muddying, and why I add a bit of balsamic vinegar to my vegetable roasting. They will bleed much more of the grey color in a milky, cheesy eggy kind of dish.

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seagrass_gw

I use red onions raw for salads. I slice them very thin and soak them in ice water. They lose their sharp taste. I like raw sweet, Vidalias on sandwiches. I cook with them, and with yellow onions for the most part. I also use shallots, leeks and green onions depending on the recipe.

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plllog

I don’t like raw red onions very much. Here, at least, they're very strong and not pleasant raw. I prefer white onions raw on burgers, and scallions in salads. We always have lovely scallions. I generally cook with Spanish (yellow) onions, though I always have white as well, and couldn't explain when I use which, though white in ground beef. Never sweet onions.

Recently, however, I've been keeping a red onion in the house for my mother’s favorite zucchini pickles. As was said above, the vinegar tempers them, as well as a little sugar, and they look pretty. So when I was temporarily short of onions, awaiting my produce delivery, I used a red onion, and purple carrots, instead of white and orange, in meatballs. They were particularly good! And pungent. The stronger red onion did itself proud. I may do that again. :)

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olychick

I realized it wasn't an informed or conscious decision I made to not ever cook with them, so I was curious what others' experience and reasons might be. It makes sense, reading the various replies here. Thanks!

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

I don't. Mainly because they're more pricey, and also because they're not as sweet as yellow onions, IMPE.

If I had them on hand, I would certainly cook with them, unless the color was a consideration in the finished dish.

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