Help Me With Another Goat Cheese

ritaweeda

I've made this goat cheese a couple of times here in the last week, fresh goat cheese with salt, pepper, and garlic chives. I was thinking the next time I make it I want to try something different, maybe some honey, chopped nuts and maybe some chopped figs but I might not be able to find that. I was trying to imagine if there would be an herb to add and was thinking maybe tarragon but does anyone out there have a good imagination on what would be better? Mint?

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plllog

Mint would be good if you like mint in food that way. Kind of a Middle Eastern approach. Tarragon is easily overwhelmed. I think I've had it in that kind of cheese, but imagining it, I can't bring it together. The trick would be to use enough tarragon to have a good flavor of it, without so much it tastes grassy. Or maybe dried would be better. Penzey's dry, though, not hard dry. Dill is really good because its intensity matches the cheese, and fresh or dry should work equally well.

Hm. Reread your question. I wouldn't put any herb with honey, nuts and figs. Aslo, be really careful combining honey and figs because it could easily get way too sweet. Honey and nut, yes. Go baklava on it. :) Fig and nut, yes. Honey, fig and nut, yes with caution. Honey and fig, no nut, no. Tarragon and fig, yum. Tarragon and nut, interesting. Tarragon, fig and nut, confusing. Mint, fig and nut, maybe good. Mint and honey, no. Dill and nut, good. Dill and sweet, no.

That's my opinion. As with anything, go ahead and try it and see what you think.

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party_music50

I did a search on 'flavored goat cheese' -- maybe a good idea there. Search results

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ritaweeda

I think you are right, the best choice would be the honey and nuts and since I don't have figs and it's such a chore trying to get anything in the store now, I'll forget that.

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lindac92

Are you making your own cheese??
I like a sort of "pesto" goat cheese. lots of basil and garlic....drizzled with EVOO.

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Islay Corbel

I find that website irritating. They go on about chèvre which means goat, not goat's cheese, when they are talking about cheese. Sigh.

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plllog

In French, that's true. In American English, fromage de chèvre is usually just called chevre (no accent), meaning the basic soft cheese, even though there's goat brie, goat gouda, etc.

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Bumblebeez SC Zone 7

I would like sage with honey and nuts also savory and marjoram.

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Islay Corbel

To English ears, it sounds pretentious. Does it to American ears? I'm guessing not....especially as it's not easy to pronounce lol

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plllog

Which sounds pretentious?

And who said Americans can pronounce French?

It's usually just called a short form of "Chevvy" (as in Chevrolet), "chev".

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Islay Corbel

Pretentious in that

A. Its the wrong word, should be fromage de chèvre

B. You can't pronounce it

C. There's a perfectly good English term : goat's cheese. 😋

There was a really funny series on english TV called keeping up appearances...it reminds me of that lol

https://youtu.be/4T0eXFpCx9c

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plllog

By American standards, "fromage de chèvre" would sound high-falutin', which is American for pretentious. In another thread recently, I did stick up for the term in France, since our previous discussion on this, because a poster in a different crossposted forum, who is American but said he'd worked often in France and spoke French well, claimed that in France they say, "chèvre". I've heard from others, as well, since you first said, that that isn't so, though I can believe if the context of cheese is already established, some French people might trim as well, and omit the "fromage", just as we might say give me "half a pound of goat," at the cheese counter and no one would think we were asking for meat.

But really, the package says chèvre, and the Americans do their best to read and say it. I always argue that "goat's cheese" isn't quite accurate, given that the white smeary stuff is sold next to goat brie, goat gouda, and other less traditional goat cheeses. Only the soft white stuff says "chèvre" on it, rather than "goat brie" or whatever, so it makes sense that we'd call it by the word on the package.

If the French can add "le" to "weekend", we can borrow your word for goat without pretension. :D

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Islay Corbel

Hahaha. They also have le parking, le camping.....but we say cul-de-sac, which in French is impasse! pied a terre...... so many of our words are common, like words ending ....tion. I love learning about all this stuff. I can only conclude that us Brits are a snooty bunch lol

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