How do you approach poison ivy?

docmom_gw(5)

Poison ivy is actually a valuable part of the native landscape, at least in the Midwest. But, I am highly allergic. I was wandering through my newly purchased 2.3 acres and discovered thick vines climbing up many of my trees. I am highly suspicious that these are poison ivy, having identified it thousands of times in the past. My initial response was to eradicate it ASAP. But, I could just stay away from it or wear long sleeves. I can’t tolerate much sun, anyway, so wear protective gear most of the time, anyway. Thoughts?


Martha

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Iris S (SC, Zone 7b)

I am on 5 acres. I leave it alone in my brush pile and some trees that are far out in the back. I take out the ones popping up in the flower beds or around my fish pond. Last time I did that, I got the double whammy of poison ivy rash and chiggers. The chiggers were worse. If you are highly allergic, is there a chance your dog is wandering around and brushing against it? Never had a problem with my dogs, but I have heard of people getting a rash by just petting their pets.

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docmom_gw(5)

We’ve only owned this property for 6 weeks or so, and everything is dormant, currently. So, I haven’t confirmed the identity of the vines climbing up the trees, and I certainly haven’t come in contact with anything to cause a rash. We do have a dog, who would certainly go exploring and bring back oils on her fir. I guess I will wait until spring to see the extent of the poison ivy, and treat as seems prudent. I am highly trained in the identification of PI, having been highly allergic all my life.

Martha

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beesneeds(zone 6)

You might not have poison ivy... you could luck out and have virginia creeper instead. Just as invasive PITA, but at least it doesn't give one a rash.

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Skip1909(7a New Jersey)

I have some thick poison ivy vines. I removed the ones that produce branches near paths I walk by regularly. I still have a few big ones that I leave alone where the leaves are out of the way. I did get a poison ivy rash on my hand while digging out japanese honeysuckle last week, so residual roots and ground level vines are something to consider. Lesson learned, glove up.

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docmom_gw(5)

Beesneeds,

I would be thrilled if these vines were Virginia Creeper. That’s one of my favorite plants. But, I’ve never seen VC get this big. I will go take some pictures and see what you think.

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dbarron(z7_Arkansas)

Here, VC gets to the tops of medium sizes trees and the vines get several inches across near base of tree. You can always tell, because of the bright red fall color after the trees own leaves drop.

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beesneeds(zone 6)

Oh docmom, gonna keep my fingers crossed for you. VC are a bane in the area, swallow everything up as bad as wild grape and poison ivy. The area is a wee bit too friendly sometimes, lol.

I've allowed VC to get a couple good years on, and they will run up the electric poles and goodly ways up the cedars and pines too if I let them.

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docmom_gw(5)

Here are some of the vines. Now that some of the snow has melted, I can see that some of the vines have been cut near the ground, so someone has tried to eliminate the plants. I will see what comes to life this spring. Here are a few shots:

My internet is really slow, so it takes forever to load photos. I hope these are decent representatives.

Martha

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beesneeds(zone 6)

To be weird.. mark that spot now while winter is on. And note if that gets 3 or 5 leaves as soon as the vines bud.
I've been fooled a time or few by early vine of VC, PI, and wild grape, lol. And been wise a time or few too.

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