How do you cook a rump roast or bottom round roast?

arkansas girl

I normally use a chuck when I make a roast and just cook at for several hours until it falls apart. I haven't been able to make a good other kind of a roast that is more lean. I was discussing this with some other people and one said they bake it at 350 for about an hour and a half, covered to internal temp of 145. They also said it is hit or miss, sometimes it good and sometimes it very tough. I'd love to make a delicious roast like they look like in the grocery store ad, you know how that look so yummy and seared on the outside and pink and juicy on the inside. How do you make a roast that is like that without it being tough as a boot? I'm not talking about making a rib roast but rather a rump or bottom round. I guess I ask because they make them look so yummy in the photos and they are always on sale for a good price.

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Elizabeth

Make sure the roast has good marbling to ensure tenderness. I also roast at 350° until desired doneness.

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amylou321

For rump roast its always heavily seasoned with salt and pepper then slow cooked all day in the crock pot with onions until it shreds apart. Then I make a gravy with the juices and return the meat to the gravy. It's not grocery store ad pretty but it's so soooooooo good served on rolls or mashed potatoes.

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Bumblebeez SC Zone 7

I get good results with a 500 degree high heat roast. Seared on the outside pink on the inside. Let rest 30 minutes before slicing.

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ediej1209 AL Zn 7

I got one a couple of weeks ago that appeared to have a decent amount of marbling. And then got distracted and it cooked to medium-well and yep it was kind of tough. Sigh. So you do need to pay attention to timing. I like to brush just a bit of olive oil on and that helps seasonings stick (since I can't have onions or garlic I rely on herbs.) Here is a link to one method:

https://www.eatlikenoone.com/how-to-cook-a-tender-flavorful-bottom-round-roast.htm


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gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)

I think it depends on how you like your roasts. Personally, I would never dry roast a chuck, rump or bottom round as they all come from heavily muscled parts of the beef and while lean, have a lot of collagen and connective tissue that requires long and slow cooking to break down and become tender. They are best braised (roasted with a liquid) like you would do with a pot roast and so served well done and fork tender

Dry roasting I reserve for the better cuts - rib roasts, loin or sirloin. These are best with high heat, fast cooking like a steak (and are the source of most steak cuts) and can be sliced and served according to desired doneness.

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Bumblebeez SC Zone 7

I've been dry high heat roasting rump and bottom for years, comes out like deli roast beef. I never go beyond medium rare.

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arkansas girl

Thanks for the information! Never too old to learn something new right!? :)

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lindac92

I would not roast medium rare either of those cuts. unless your rump roast is very well marbled it will be tough....same for bottom round. For "picture perfect" roast beef I want either sirloin or rolled rib....rump and round get braised and turned into a "yankee pot roast".


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arkansas girl

Over the years, I had just resolved myself to buying chuck roasts because they are the most fall apart tender. But I thought I was missing out on something. You know, we all kind of get in a rut of doing the same thing over and over. I definitely do not want a tough roast though.

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chloebud

Ditto to gardengal's response for the exact reasons she mentioned. It can be hit or miss to dry roast a rump or bottom round roast. They're tasty but often tough. Cooking low/slow will allow the connective tissue to soften and melt. I just roasted a sirloin tip roast the other night...tasty.




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WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

Have always used rump roast when making our favorite Italian Roast Beef in the slow cooker. It is so easy and so yummy. We don't believe it is tough.

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chloebud

WalnutCreek, the slow cooker is a good choice for a rump roast. Definitely tender and yummy.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

Dry rub, homemade, includes a bit of coconut palm sugar. Pre-heat oven 450º. Dutch oven, enameled cast iron. Stove top medium heat with chunked onion, garlic, celery...wine or beer, two inches. Roast into oven on top of veg/liquids uncovered for 1/2 hour to brown. (roast cold, straight from the fridge). Oven down to 300º, cover. 2 hours. Check internal temp.

Same with steak and burgers. No salt. Dry age 10-24 hours uncovered in fridge. (salt makes proteins sweat and wet). They steam when wet. Cold from the fridge the internal temp stays rare longer. Medium heat will give a great sear and still be rare/medium-rare internal. No hot smoky pan needed.


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gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)

Walnut Creek, if you are using a slow cooker, then you are cooking low and slow and most likely with some sort of liquid. Pretty much any cut of meat will come out tender using this method :-) Meats prepared this way need to be - or will be - well done so no chance of the dark exterior bark and the perfectly pink medium rare interior. To not cook to well done will result in a tough chewy meat.

But I do not consider that 'roasting', which is defined by an open dry heat source. No cover, no liquid and usually a much shorter cook time for beef. But best left to the better cuts, IMO.

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WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

Very true gardengal. I was answering the OP's question to the best of my ability as to how I cook rump roast.

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Angela Id


I shove cloves of garlic into slits all over the roast, salt and pepper it, let it sit on a rack, uncovered, in the fridge overnight. Pull it out to come to room temp for a while. Pop it into a 200 degree oven until the internal temp reaches 115 degrees. Tent it and let it rest for half an hour to an hour, while I prepare the sides. Crank the oven to 400 degrees and put it back in for 10 minutes. Comes out just right for us.

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Bumblebeez SC Zone 7


This is a good method for

the high heat roasting. I typically just do the whole time at 500 for quickness but I might try this next time.

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Angela Id

I would probably cry if anyone put a piece of beef in front of me that was cooked to 145 degrees. LOL

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annie1992

Angela, I wouldn't cry outside, but inside, I'd be crying, LOL. I'm not generally a big fan of well done roasts, although I do occasionally put a brisket in the dutch oven or make beef stew.

I use AnnT's method of pre-salting and then high heat roasting, but I only cook to about 120F, let it rest then slice it really thinly. That thin slice makes even the tough roasts easier to chew, LOL.

Annie


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arkansas girl

Angela and annie1992, what cut of meat do you use?

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Angela Id

Rump roast, cross rib roast, sirloin tip steak ...

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arkansas girl

Maybe I'll try a small sirloin tip roast in my rotisserie cooker.

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WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

@arkansas girl, if you do try the roast on the rotisserie, let us know what you did and how it turns out, please. Just got an air fryer with a rotisserie and want to try it, but am chicken to do so unless someone who has actual cooked whatever says how they did and how long and how it worked out.

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arkansas girl

I've had this rotisserie for years and kind of just set it aside. I remember cooking a few roasts in it and it was kind of hit or miss. I don't believe that I ever used it for the sirloin tip roast though. I kind of stopped using it because it was more miss than hit. I will try to do this sooner rather than later and post the method and results.

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annie1992

I also use rump, sirloin tip, round or my all time favorite: "beef roast". Yeah, the guy who processes my beef will take some indefinable chunk of meat and just label it "roast", LOL/ I roast it rare, put it on the slicer as thin as I can set it and it becomes sandwiches.

Annie

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Islay Corbel

You'd get the kind of results you're looking for if you get a sous vide set up. It's all getting cheaper and cheaper now. Worth looking into.

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artemis_ma

I recently cooked a bottom round roast.

In my case, I cut it into thick steaks, at least an inch thick, add salt (not as much as G. Ramsey), ground pepper, and garlic. Sous vide at 133 F for about 24 hours for medium rare - if for more medium try 140 F.

Sear on a skillet or grill briefly, serve. For mine I made a horseradish gravy using the drippings from the bag.

This was vey good - not as good as a regular steak, of course, but still tender. Note that my cut was extremely lean (read: potentially tough) since it was what ended up in my house through a local beef share from cattle that are fully pastured all their lives.

Equipment needed: a sous vide immersion device (they are really coming down in price - I got mine for $60 something about a year and a half ago), a stock pot, foil to cover the top so water doesn't evaporate while this does its thing. I also bought reusable silicon bags with a tight zip locking feature so I'm not adding to the plastic stream (or making food taste like plastic). Those are pricy but you can use them again and again.



(Click image to see a larger photo)

You can also cook the whole thing that way, but since I didn't want to cook it all at once, the steaks helped make good portions. I might go a couple more hours if a whole roast, just to give the interior time to reach temperature before "counting".

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