Eat "Dutch" -- Rouladen

Martha Scott

We ate "Dutch" last night as my father's German family used to say when eating German food. Rouladen which I had eaten before but never made. Modestly, I must admit that I "nailed it"! Served with the required red cabbage!


BEEF ROULADEN


4 8 ounce sirloin steaks

2 t. salt

1/4 t. pepper

4 slices bacon

4 thick slices onion, cut in half

1 large dill pickle, cut lengthwise into fourths

1/4 c. plus 1 T. flour, divided

4 t. butter

2 cups beef broth

2 T. ketchup


Flatten steaks with meat claver until very thin; season with salt and pepper. On each steak, place a slice of bacon, 1/2 onion slice and one pickle stick. Roll up steak and tie with string. Roll in 1/4 c. flour and saute in butter until well browned. Add 1 T. flour to butter. Add broth and ketchup, cover pan and cook slowly for 30 minutes. Remove string before serving.

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Comments (29)
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party_music50

I love rouladen! My recipe came from a co-worker/friend from Germany, and he told me it HAD to be served with mashed potatoes and Le Sueur baby peas, so that's what we always have. lol! I haven't made it in a long time, but it's come to mind recently and I think it's due!

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Rusty

I grew up on dishes like this. I guess that's not too surprising, seeing as how I am first generation American, parents born and raised in Germany. But my mother never put pickle in them, consequently, I don't, either. I'll have to try that sometime.

Yours look delicious, Martha, and have sent me on a trip down memory lane this morning.

Rusty

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louiseab Ibbotson

The recipe that I’ve used, doesn’t call for a dill pickle per se, but a German pickle that’s a little sweet and savoury at once. I can’t remeber what they’re called.

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Martha Scott

My German was on my Dad's side so we didn't eat a lot of German food growing up (pork and sauerkraut served with mashed potatoes is about the one I remember). But we have a German restaurant about an hour from here. She w as from Germany (but cannot remember which part) and this is how they serve their rouladen. I thought it tasted like theirs! But Germany is a lot like the US -- there are regional specialities. (I'd never heard of a bierock until I moved to SW Missouri and a family from western Kansas started coming to church -- I later found out that it was a dish brought to the US from Eastern Germany along the Russian border -- my family came from the NW). All regions seem to eat sauerkraut, cabbage and potatoes, however!

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foodonastump

I haven’t make them in a while either. Mine get a pickle. Gewürzgurke. Mine also get a smear of mustard before rolling them up.

Looks great and I’m inspired!

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seagrass_gw

I traveled with my husband on business for over 10 years, NATO countries. We lived in the Netherlands for several years about 11 years ago. The food in the Netherlands wasn't all that great as far as restaurants but we did have access to good grocery stores. When we traveled to Germany, Belgium & France we had no trouble finding delicious meals to eat out.

What I learned living in Holland was that about 20,000 Dutch died of starvation during the Hunger Winter of 1944-45 and millions more suffered from malnourishment because of the Nazi occupation. The Dutch hold no affection for the Germans to this day. So, I don't understand the phrase: "Eating Dutch".

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foodonastump

Seagrass - I assumed Pennsylvania Dutch (PA Deutsch)

Martha?

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seagrass_gw

Thank you, FOAS. That makes sense. I thought about deleting my post but I wanted to understand.

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lizbeth-gardener

I remember when I was a child hearing Germans referred to as "Dutch" and not understanding why, as they weren't from the Netherlands. Then at some point finding out people were meaning "Deutsch", not "Dutch".

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lindac92

Deutsch is German for "German"...as in sprechen zie Deutsch?
My Father's family is Dutch Dutch....many generations removed.

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Martha Scott

But my GERMAN family said "DUTCH" not "Deutsch" when referring to having a meal of German food. As in "Eat Dutch". I'm sure it was from Deutsch but was just "shortened". And they were not referring to the Netherlands. They also came over way after those Pennsylvania Dutch immigrants. So it didn't refer to the Pennsylvania Germans. Seagrass, somehow, it just got shortened to "Dutch" over here and doesn't refer to people living in The Netherlands at all. Early (as in the Pennsylvania Dutch) as well as late (as in my 1880 immigrant ancestors).

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John Liu

That's a neat story.

"Dutch" gets used in a lot of sayings that today don't have much to do with the Netherlands.

I found this list: https://www.dutchnews.nl/features/2015/01/10-english-expressions-involving-dutch/

And this: https://www.iamexpat.nl/expat-info/dutch-expat-news/english-expressions-and-idioms-word-dutch

Most of those likely referred originally to the actual Dutch, but there may be some that are derived from "Deutsch".

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foodonastump

John - I was SURE your link would forget one expression, but it didn’t. I snorted loudly on a conference call.

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pkramer60

I am grinning at your photo Martha. Being German, roladen are always ready to eat in my freezer, served with klosse or spaetzele and red cabbage. Mom never added the pickle or the tomato, but I do add the pickle. But Mom was sneaky. A neighbor asked for her recipe and she gave her the one with the tomato. We were invited to dinner at their house 2 years ago and both Dad and I informed her that Mom NEVER used the red stuff. She didn't believe me, showed me the recipe card and I had to send over my roladen to prove it. Next time you make them, try it with thin cut round steak. Just simmer a bit longer.

As for the grin, you have the same Spode Blue Italian that Grandmother, mother and now I have.

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foodonastump

Yeah I was surprised at the sirloin. I get round cut on the slicer.

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John Liu

Snorted, or _____ed?

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mamapinky0

So this dish has a name outside of beef in gravy as my German father called it. But I was 8 when my parents divorced so it could be he called it that as an explanation to children. I don't recall any pickle though. I have never made this and can't even remember thinking much of it through the years.

It's now on my menu in the near future.

Thank you for the memory and recipe.

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foodonastump

Another name? They were Tote Mäuschen (dead mice) in my family growing up. Which I can’t believe I forgot until just now.

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John Liu

Is German-style roulade also made with pork? Any recipes?

I tend to eat more pork and chicken than beef.

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foodonastump

I don’t see why you can’t. Would just need to pick a cut that will stand up to the braising. I’ve seen shoulder cut into cutlets for pork braciole. (Beef for braciole is what I buy when I don’t go to the German butcher.)

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Martha Scott

John -- I've only seen it in beef but I don't know why you couldn't make it with pork. I have some thin boneless pork chops in the fridge and I've been looking at veal recipes for those --


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pkramer60

John, I have never seen it done but I did Google it and a bunch of recipes came up and they use the same ingredients. I wonder how thin cut pork loin would work. They certainly would look like the Tote Mäuschen.

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Sherry

Martha, I have got to stop clicking on your posts, lol. I can't make things fast enough! Foas, I had to google gewürzgurke. Turns out it is gherkin in English. We always had them growing up. Dad had a German background (last name Geiger), but never made rouladen. He probably didn't know how.

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Ellie RK

Looks so good!!

My husbands family is Polish, but they're about 2 hours from the German border and they make this too. There's a Polish butcher here and if you tell him what you're making, he'll cut the beef into perfect thin slices for this dish.

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artemis_ma

That looks great!!!!

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Islay Corbel

Dutch oven lol

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mamapinky0

I made this for today's dinner. Very good. My grands LOVED it. I used round steak which the butcher kindly sliced very thin for me. I simmered longer do to the cut of the beef. I will make it again, and again. Thank you for the recipe.

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Martha Scott

Glad you liked it mama pinky!


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foodonastump

I’ve been inspired, too!



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