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anm6831

Building Our First Home - Can't Decide on Builder or Floor Plan

anm6831
6 years ago

My husband and I are in the process of building our own home in the Raleigh/Durham area, specifically in the Granville/Alamance/Orange County area. We are still in search of land, but we are also trying to decide between two builders. I really like the Abigail floor plan from Schumacher, and my husband likes the Branford floor plan by Drees. There are things we like and dislike about both builders. We've seen some negative reviews regarding Schumacher; however, Schumacher seems a bit more custom than Drees, which makes me more inclined to work with them. Overall, the cost seems comparable.

Has anyone in the Raleigh/Durham area worked with either Schumacher or Drees before? Does anyone have any opinions about either builder or floor plan?


Schumacher - Abigail Floor Plan



Drees - Branford Floor Plan






I specifically don't like that with the Branford, you walk right into the dining room. I don't like that the entrance to the master is basically in the living room, and that the master shares a wall with the living room (it's pushed back in the Abigail floor plan). I also wish the family room and kitchen were a bit larger (longer). If you put furniture in the family room, the back of the couch is very close to the island. The Abigail is more spacious, and I believe provides a bit more counter top in the kitchen.

In the Branford, I like the bonus room (compared to the loft in the Abigail), and the extra unfinished storage. I also like that there is a linen closet upstairs (the Abigail has none).

This is such a major decision - we plan for this to be our forever home! Once our house is built, we actually plan to build a barn wedding/events venue on our property. I'm inclined to choose the option that lets me have more customization, to ensure that our forever home is EXACTLY how we want it, but I'm just not sure. We're stuck! Thoughts?! Opinions?! Advice?!

Comments (56)

  • Lori Wagerman_Walker
    6 years ago

    You pretty much walk into the dining room in both of them. You could define the spaces a bit more with a half wall or columns/posts. Lots of options there. In the first one, I think I'd take bedroom #3 and make it good sized bathroom. Take the bathroom & loft space to make bedroom #3. That's a lot of bedroom for such a tiny bath!!
    Site planning does have a lot to do with it, but if you have an idea of what you're going for, getting ideas with plans isn't going to hurt anything.
    Reading the info around in here is absolutely priceless...

  • AnnKH
    6 years ago

    How many people in your family? What part of the country?

    You say you don't like the front door opening into the dining room - but that is the case in both these plans.

    Both your plans have you going through the master bath to get to the closet. You must be OK with this - I definitely would not be.

    Both plans have 2-story rooms - again, I am not a fan. It sounds like your budget is closer to modest than unlimited; I would advise against planning spaces that have to be heated and cooled, but provide no function.

    In both cases the path from the bedrooms to the laundry room is a maze. Ideally, laundry should be on an outside wall to easily vent the dryer.

    The Abigail is a bit better in terms of natural light - at least the kitchen has a window. The dining room in the Bradford is going to be downright gloomy.

    Any time I see "Flex room", I read "Here's a space that doesn't serve an obvious function in the home, but maybe we can pawn it off as a Mom Den". An efficient house plan will have have rooms designed to do double duty (office/guest room, for example), instead of plopping in rooms that may or may not be used much.

    Assuming you have kids, the Abigail has no second living space. If adults are having a conversation in the great room, it will be drowned out by kids playing Mario Kart in the loft. Depending on how many kids, the little Flex room probably isn't going to cut it.

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  • anm6831
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    jannicone - We would certainly appreciate that! We found many plans
    online that we liked, but haven't found a builder who will allow us to
    bring in our own plan. I've emailed a number of builders, and they
    either don't build in the area we're looking to build in, are out of our
    price range, or we just haven't heard back at all. It seemed like Drees
    and Schumacher were our best/only options, but I'd be happy to contact
    anyone you know in the area.

    One Devoted Dame - I know!! I saw that and thought it was strange too! We would obviously choose to have a railing. :) Thank you for your feedback - those are
    certainly great things to know! We are very new to this process, so any
    tips are helpful! We hadn't really looked into using an architect, but
    maybe we'll have to do that.

    Lori Wagerman_Walker - Yeah, know they both kind of walk you into the dining room, but I think the Abigail doesn't feel as though you are walking into the dining room quite as
    much, because it is a little more sectioned off with columns. We
    actually did discuss adding a second bathroom upstairs. We also talked
    about adding a full bath downstairs, instead. So that if we used the
    flex room for guests, they would have a full bath to use downstairs, and
    it would be easier for older guests, so they wouldn't have to use the
    stairs. But yes, we do have a pretty good idea of what we're looking
    for, and there are just so many options!

  • palimpsest
    6 years ago

    If you are building on 20 acres you can do much better than this. These are houses meant to be built close together on small lots.

    There is no guest toilet on the first floor in the second plan unless you do the optional guest suite, and even then it is a full bath, not really a powder room for guests.

    I am really not a fan of either but the second house would be eliminated immediately for a number of reasons.

  • tqtqtbw
    6 years ago

    They both have TV on the master bedroom wall with no buffer and both have master closets connected to master bathroom. I don't like either of these details due to noise and dampness, respectively.

    "Open to below" space can make your rooms too cold downstairs and too hot upstairs in the winter. Railing vs short wall -- a short wall helps reduce noise from downstairs disturbing the bedroom closest to the railing. A TV in the loft of the first plan may fight with the sound of one downstairs. (We have a vaulted ceiling, short wall and game room more down the hall but still have a lot of "turn that down" going on.)

    Consider your furniture with the stairs have that many bends/turns.

  • anm6831
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    AnnKH

    Currently, it's just my
    husband and I, but we plan to have 1-3 children. We are looking in the
    Raleigh/Durham area of North Carolina.

    Yes, I realize that
    they both kind of walk into the dining room, but the dining room in the
    Abigail is a bit more sectioned off.

    I think we're okay with walking through the bathroom to get to the closets. What would be your issue?

    We
    both would like a 2-story great room - I realize that it's wasted
    space, but we like the openness of it and the natural light that the
    wall of windows brings in.

    Regarding a second living space,
    that is something that I like in the Branford, compared to the Abigail.
    We discussed possibly trying to close off the loft in the Abigail for
    the exact reasons that you mentioned.

    I appreciate your feedback!

  • Lori Wagerman_Walker
    6 years ago

    Personally, my closet is thru our master bath and I fracking love it. Hubby's door to his is in the bedroom. They actually back up to each other and buffer our bedroom from the garage.
    I love mine because I can go in the bathroom, turn on all the lights, shower (including singing), get my clothes, blow dry my hair, put on the rest of my clothes (middle aged fat woman, hot flashes suck), get completely ready without waking him. We leave at almost the same time in the morning, but of course he's up & out in 5.
    However, we have absolutely no problem bouncing around each other in the bathroom, one on the pot, one in the shower, doesn't matter to us. We only have 1 sink too!! I needed the counter space way more than I needed to stay out of his way while teeth brushing. :)
    I know some people aren't as brazen as we are... YMMV.

  • tqtqtbw
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I don't like the clothes near the steam from my long showers. I'm concerned about mold in the closet. Plus, now I want the bathroom to myself. Our closet is a buffer between the family room and the master bedroom.

    If you do build a house with a vaulted or open ceiling, consider where you put the thermostat for upstairs. Ours is in the hall and because of the rising heat in the winter, will not trip on to heat the upstairs bedrooms. An HVAC company suggested moving the thermostat into one of the bedrooms to get a reading of an occupied space. I had our unfinished storage area sheet-rocked upon move-in and it has provided valuable storage over the years.

    This is a great time for you. I remember selecting our forever home as a pre-child couple and watching our three grow up in the space.

  • AnnKH
    6 years ago

    My objections to a clothes closet in the bathroom:

    - I don't want to have to lug laundry baskets through the bathroom to put away clothes.

    - I'm lazy - I don't want to have to go 20 extra feet (as in the Bradford) to grab a sweater out of my closet.

    - If Hubby is doing anything in the bathroom, I don't want to go past him to get to get to the closet - nor do I want him interrupting my bath to get to his closet.

    - If you insist on closets in the bathroom, make sure you put in plenty of ventilation, so your clothes don't end up damp. You end up with a lot more volume that needs to be dehumidified.

    - Corners are the most desirable spaces in the house, and the Bradford ties up a lovely corner with a big closet. Yes, the closet has a window, but sunlight quickly fades clothing, and you aren't going to get a lot of cross-ventilation from that window. How much time will you spend in the closet, gazing out the window?

  • cpartist
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    In the first plan the powder room toilet is closet to the master bedroom than the master bathroom toilet.

    All the bedrooms upstairs have no sound insulation from one another. I could go on and on, but those are the first 2 things I noticed.

    The second plan requires walking through the kitchen to get from the garage to the rest of the house and as ODD mentioned is a fat house that will have an oversized roof and won't let in lots of light.

    You can do much better.

    As others have stated, first find the land and then find an architect to work with. Find a small builder, not a production builder. Production builders build fast and build to the lowest common denominator. Meaning they build the minimum required.

    As for not hearing back from other builders, that's because the best ones are busy now. Call again and be prepared to wait for them.

  • Lori Wagerman_Walker
    6 years ago

    As others have stated, first find the land and then find an architect to work with. Find a small builder, not a production builder. Production builders build fast and build to the lowest common denominator. Meaning they build the minimum required.

    Yes. Talk to people you know. A local custom builder would be a definite plus.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    6 years ago
    Understand one thing. If your budget for this house is under $400k you will be working with “production type” builder. You will have few options and lowest possible quality. The previous advise to find a good small home builder not a BIG corp builder and get your own architect are best advice here. That will cost you up front, but save in long run. You can dream all you want and that will help you clarify your WANTS vs nice to haves. But until you find property, just dreaming.
  • strategery
    6 years ago

    You have no land and can't decide on a plan or a builder. Hopefully you at least have a budget.

  • lexma90
    6 years ago

    You said above "Also, if we decide to go with a builder like Drees, they purchase the land that we select as part of the process, so we'd have to at least know that we like some of their floor plans prior to getting the land and working with them."

    Do you mean that you'll find the 20 acres, and the builder (Drees) would purchase YOUR property? That's a red flag in my book (we talked to one builder for our house who wanted to do this). What if you select your property, and Drees buys it, then you change your mind about using that builder? What if that builder goes out of business? Why would the builder purchase your land - the one we talked to said they needed to use the value of the land to get financing for the build. You don't want to be in that situation.

    Really, you can find an architect in all sorts of price ranges.

  • cpartist
    6 years ago

    Problems with the Branford:

    As mentioned, the first thing you see when you walk in is the dining room. The second thing you see is the angled staircase.

    Speaking of the staircase, winder stairs are about the most dangerous.

    The laundry is quite a distance from the master bedroom. Imagine hauling laundry from the bathroom or closet, through the living room, then the kitchen, then around the family foyer and finally into the laundry room. No thanks!

    Like others I'm not a fan of walking through the bathroom to get to my clothes for all the reasons stated. YMMV.

    The closet shouldn't get an outside corner of the house. Outside corners should be saved for rooms that we use more than a few minutes a day.

    The family room will not be 21'10" of usable space. The actual usable space is more likely 13'10" based on the fact that the entry to the owners suite interrupts the usable space towards the bottom. Meaning you need a pathway.

    Don't you like your guests? Making them sleep off the kitchen?

    And then to get to the bathroom, being in full view of the outdoor sunroom or deck.

    Speaking of dining, notice what a hike it is to the dining room from the kitchen? Now imagine doing that night after night carrying hot plates.

    Open to below sounds nice until you actually live in it.

    The angled closet in bedroom 4 makes for unusable space inside.

    The entry into bedroom 2 is just wasted space.

    Why do the bedrooms upstairs only have a single window? How depressing.



  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect
    6 years ago

    "Don't you like your guests? Making them sleep off the kitchen?"

    As long as they have breakfast ready by 7:30 am I will like them.

  • PRO
    Mark Bischak, Architect
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Anm - Do yourself a favor, contact a few local architects and talk with them about the benefits of designing a home with them. You don't have to be another vanilla cookie.

  • One Devoted Dame
    6 years ago

    You don't have to be another vanilla cookie.

    I'm a gingersnap, myself.

  • shead
    6 years ago

    Oh good lawd, if you are buying your own land and building, your options are endless. Don't marry yourself to either of these plans as both obviously have issues. Check out smaller custom builders and definitely hire an architect. Now is not the time to saddle yourself with a subdivision plan. As others have said, your land will decide a lot.

  • palimpsest
    6 years ago

    Especially on large plot of land there is nothing wrong with building a simple rectangular house with a single peaked roof and direct exterior exposure of every room in the house except powder rooms, the pantry and secondary bathroom.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    6 years ago
    Strongly recommend starting with your own architect. Interview several and get with someone who can help you create your Phase 1 of your project. With a Master Plan you will be so much better off. As Mark pointed out, there are so many great options to you when you get a creative architect to work with you. Seek expertise to help you. You need time to pull all the details together. As also mentioned, architects can help in so many ways, zoning, code compliance, survey professionals, design and making a space also ready from day one for expanded living and business endeavors. You have big dreams and i know what it takes to pull this type project off. Get an architect in the area you are shopping for property. They will have all the contacts you will need. Best of luck planning and executing your dream.
  • shead
    6 years ago

    And furthermore (lol), with 20 acres, you might consider doing a one-story plan. I'm not sure if basements are feasible in your area but, in my experience, 1 story plans with a walk-out basement would be ideal long-term.

  • chispa
    6 years ago

    If you can't afford the forever plan at the moment and also don't have any kids to fill it up right now, you could have an architect design a house to be built in 2 stages. The main part to accommodate a young/small family and an addition to be added as the family get larger, in quantity and size.

  • littlebug zone 5 Missouri
    6 years ago

    Have you read this thread below on Schumacher builders? The first post was made several years ago, but there have been some recent posters, too. Lots of information on this builder.


    Houzz thread on Schumacher homes

  • cac546
    6 years ago
    In addition to the many issues pointed out by others, I just want to really strongly suggest talking to people who have kids and also have a two-story great room. My husband and I built a (production) home pre-kids and a two story great room was a requirement for us for the reasons you mentioned. It wasn't a big deal until we had kids but now it's awful. As soon as our first child was born we essentially lost the ability to use our downstairs in any useful fashion after 7pm. We end up hanging out in our bedroom after the kids go to bed which is a giant pain. We're just about done with our custom build and I CANT. WAIT. to not have a two-story great room. As a bonus, our new great room has just as much light.
  • One Devoted Dame
    6 years ago

    It wasn't a big deal until we had kids but now it's awful.

    ^^^ I approve this message. ^^^

    -- Mom of 6, 5 of which are BOYS.

  • Kristin S
    6 years ago

    See, this is another area where I think it's more a matter of preference than any hard and fast rule. We have a five-year-old and a two story great room and we love it - it's nice to be able to keep an eye on the goings-on upstairs when she's up there alone or with friends, and she likes that she can also keep an eye on what we're doing downstairs. That said, we don't have a t.v. in our great room (by deliberate choice unmotivated by its two-storiness), and I might feel differently if we did. We also really love the light we get from the big wall of windows (and it's a south facing room, so we couldn't get anymore light just by reorienting the house).

  • jmm1837
    6 years ago

    @Kristin - I probably wasn't as clear as I should have been in my posting. When I said that orientation is critical, I meant that, with proper orientation and design, any house can be light and bright. Certainly, a one-story house, with windows oriented to the south and east in North America, will be lighter and brighter than a two story house with windows facing north.

    And unless you're backing onto a forest, as we were, you definitely don't want a lot of big windows facing west.

    So, a floor plan that would work for a design around light coming from the south won't necessarily work for one facing in a different direction. And we don't always get a choice about orientation: where the road is, the slope of the land, the setbacks (or, what we call here in Aus, the "building envelope") can limit which direction the house can face. That's where the issue of designing to fit the site comes in.

    As to whether you want a two story or not, I agree that's a matter of taste, but I wouldn't go for it solely because one thinks it will be lighter than a single story. Like the song say, "It ain't necessarily so" :)

  • robin0919
    6 years ago

    I would ck with the local lumber yards and get recommendations for local builders and stay away from tract builders. IMO....track builders are the worst out there.

  • anm6831
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    All, you have been so very helpful, and we truly appreciate
    all of your feedback! It’s clear that we need to look into the possibility of
    using an architect. To be honest, I think we had read and seen some things that
    made us feel that an architect would almost certainly be out of our budget, but
    as one of you pointed out, you won’t know unless you ask. We’ve already started
    our research, and my fingers are crossed that we’ll find an architect who is
    able to work with us within our budget! If any of you happen to live in the
    area and have any recommendations, we would really appreciate it!

    You all have also opened our eyes to a few things we didn’t
    really consider, or didn’t realize could pose an issue – having to walk through
    the master bath to get to our closets, the placement of the laundry room, the
    cons of a 2-story great room, etc. We have a lot to think about and consider,
    and again, we really appreciate all of the great feedback!

    Chispa – we LOVE your suggestion! That had never really
    occurred to us, but it makes a lot of sense. Since we don’t have children yet,
    and it will be a couple years before our family really begins to grow, our
    second story will remain largely unused for a while. If we could have our main
    level built now, and leave the second level unfinished, for example, we could
    save up front, and use what we’ve saved to begin building our events venue even
    sooner!

    Lastly, as most of you have pointed out, we should find some
    land! We have been doing research and have spotted a few pieces of land we’re
    interested in, but like the builders, have had trouble getting in touch with
    realtors to take us out and show us the property. We finally have a meeting
    with a realtor tomorrow evening, so the process of finding our land will hopefully
    be underway very soon!

  • Holly Stockley
    6 years ago

    It's Spring! So go out and hit the local Parade of Homes thingies. TALK to the builders, who are usually there. (Sometimes this is more likely on weekends than on weekdays) You'll rapidly get a feel for who you like and who you don't want to work with. You can do two other things this way: Get a feel for what given room sizes actually are like, AND start getting an understanding of who costs what. Bonus - those homes on the parade that are architect designed will usually have contact info for said architect. Be warned - everybody gets innundated right after a parade, so even after you've TALKED to builders, it might be a while before they follow up with you - they're trying to follow up with the 100 or so people they talked to.

    Keep up the land shopping. Hint - if you can't pay cash for the land, then use it as collateral on the construction loan, you may not have the best current plan. At the very least, you should be able to cover the cost of the land with what you get out of your current house when you sell. In my neck of the woods, the best land parcels never actually get listed. They're snapped up by people "plugged in" to the local network. I got around that by using the GIS system to locate likely parcels and contact their owners.

  • shead
    6 years ago

    When considering leaving an unfinished upper space, do take into consideration that all the expensive stuff must/should be in place when you do the original build (plumbing, electrical, HVAC, etc) or you will pay a LOT more later. Thus, unfinished upper space doesn't save you an enormous amount of money up front.

  • PRO
    Patricia Colwell Consulting
    6 years ago

    First you find the land, then you get an architect that designs a house for the place you want the house and it might be on a hill which will have an effect on the design of the house. Do this in order instead of trying to make a house plan fit the land.IMO there is no point in critiquing either of these plans without knowing where they are going.

  • Lori Wagerman_Walker
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    shead agreed... You're better to build small with room for expansion, than build "unfinished" areas.

  • anm6831
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Shead and Lori, I understand! It was just a thought that came to mind - we'll obviously need to talk with the architect/builder to see what possibilities we have if we go that route.

  • Lori Wagerman_Walker
    6 years ago

    Go find land! :) ha... keep us posted!

  • anm6831
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I certainly will!! :)

  • cpartist
    6 years ago

    BTW: If you can't find an architect locally, there are several here who will work remotely with you.

  • J G
    6 years ago

    I would think carefully if you want to have a first floor master bedroom with the rest of your bedrooms upstairs with a newborn. With small kids I want a space that can be the toy room that is not part of the living/dining room area that I personally like to keep picked up from toys. The flex plan provides this space, but it would not have any site lines or connection to the kitchen or the rest of the house...my 2 year old would certainly not have played in the flex room while I made dinner. I guess the flex room could become a nursery if you made a door in the closet...it just does not seem ideal

  • tqtqtbw
    6 years ago

    A first floor master is great with a newborn. Just put a bassinet/pack-n-play in your room. Plus, they are great when recovering from injuries, surgery, or just aging in place.

    I had a Little Tikes play tunnel and a toy box in the family room until my stair-step aged children outgrew them. I could see them right over the breakfast bar but it wasn't immediately visible from the front door.

  • anm6831
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Yeah, our thought was that if this is our forever home, we want it to be accessible when we are aging. It's also just more convenient, in my opinion. I know some folks have mentioned not wanting to walk the extra few feet through the bathroom to get to their master closet and grab a sweater, but I'd also rather not have to walk up a flight of stairs to grab a sweater.

    We planned to use either a flex space/guest room/bedroom downstairs as a nursery, and we had talked about using the sun room area off of the kitchen as more of a play room, so that we can keep an eye on the kiddos while we cook, etc.

  • shead
    6 years ago

    @anm6831, we access our closets through our bathroom and love the set up. I actually vote for having all clothing (undies, etc.) in the closet to not have to go back into my bedroom to retrieve forgotten items from drawers. DH is notorious for leaving the bedroom door open :/

  • grapefruit1_ar
    6 years ago

    We built our home ( used an architect and custom builder) 32 years ago. It has a master suite on the first floor, but we wanted to be upstairs while the kids were young. So, that is what we did. Our " kids" are now 34 and 35 ( and not at home!),and we are still sleeping upstairs! Our room has 5 windows and nice views. Of course the first floor master is still there in case we need it in the future.

    DH and I are residential lot developers. We will sometimes build spec homes when a new section is developed. In order to keep the costs down we always have walk out basements with plenty of Windows. We do not finish that space because we figure that the homeowner will want to make their own choices,. Maybe this is a way that you can keep costs down at the onset. Once the kids arrive/grow you can determine how you want to use that space.

    Enjoy the process!

  • grapefruit1_ar
    6 years ago

    I forgot to add, 20 acres is a lot of land. Our first home was on 14 acres ( DH was from the city so he wanted LAND)! We were there for 8 years before we built our current home on 2 acres. Keep in mind that your 20 acres will border on other properties and you can sometimes be reaponsible when something happens. We got a call from an irate property owner because one of our trees had fallen on his property. It was not a dangerous situation and had caused no damage. But, we still needed to deal with it. We had dirt bikes come whizzing by our deck, horse riders were cutting across the front yard, a bullet came flying by us and pinged off our downspout, and hunters were killing deer down by our pond. Gosh, I miss that place. :)

  • anm6831
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    grapefruit1_ar - I can't remember if I mentioned this in my original post, but our long term plan is to also build a barn wedding/events venue on the land. So, we're looking for a bit more land to encompass our house, the venue, parking area for venue, etc., while also maintaining a barrier/privacy from any neighbors.

    We actually did look at a few house plans that had a downstairs and upstairs master suite, but I wasn't sure how I felt about that. It just seems like whichever one we aren't using would be a large waste of space. I suppose whichever one we aren't using could be used as a guest suite, but we also don't have that many guests. :/

    I would definitely be open to the possibility of an unfinished basement to cut down on cost up front.

    So many things to consider! I appreciate your feedback! :)

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    6 years ago
    Have you looked at other Wedding venues and tried to pick their brains on all the issues you need to be aware of in setting this plan in motion? Have you considered building with a Bed and Breakfast Inn and make your living quarters part of a house and eventual complex. This is what I am talking about developing a Master Plan. Actually, a Business Plan as well. Get educated on local codes, zoning etc. because there might be areas that simply won’t let you do what you want to do. This is another reason to sit down with an architect and s/he can outline potential issues. Then weave in your personal short term objectives. Start with the end in mind. You may be jumping into the pool at the deep end to start to learn how to swim. It can be done, but you can drown too. Any home should have every bedroom with ensuite bathroom. At some point, you might want a separate home and then this house would be readily converted to a B&B for guests of wedding party members etc. it is an exciting venture but get informed. Meet with people who understand and can help you gain knowledge before you go much further. Hoping to help you avoid costly mistakes. This is not a small endeavor.
  • PRO
    Virgil Carter Fine Art
    6 years ago

    Well...with this level of complexity in land selection, site planning, architectural design, possible phased construction...have you considered working with someone who knows something about what your situation actually needs...

    Someone like...an architect?

    Might save you a lot of time and money. Really.

  • anm6831
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Flo Mangan - We are certainly doing our research before making any final decisions, and are aware of the issues we may come across finding land, due to zoning. We'd like to avoid costly mistakes, as well!

    Virgil Carter Fine Art - Yes! We are in the process of setting up meetings with a number of local architects to see if they can assist us.

  • Najeebah
    6 years ago

    "I'm inclined to choose the option that lets me have more customization, to ensure that our forever home is EXACTLY how we want it"
    There's a species suited to that; Homo Architectus. The subspecies Homo Architectus Customis Residentialis is particularly well suited.

    "It’s clear that we need to look into the possibility of using an architect."
    Make that a certainty, I'm with you.

    "I think we had read and seen some things that made us feel that an architect would almost certainly be out of our budget"
    Devious lies to defame the art. No, it is true it's a significant expense, but it's a valuable one. The good ones will keep you on budget.

    "You all have also opened our eyes to a few things we didn’t really consider, or didn’t realize could pose an issue"
    Kudos. Being open to feedback here can go a long way.

    Good luck finding that architect. And the land..