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Crassula / Jade collecting (Looking for UK sellers)

Callum G
6 years ago

Hi guys, I'm currently making a Jade collection, So far I have the common jade, Gollem/Hobbit, common variegated and a 'ripple' (Recently found in IKEA!!), I've ordered another 3 species online and hopefully I'll get them in the next week or so, then I shall have 7 varieties!

Have been growing them for around 10 years but have only recently decided to collect as many varieties as possible.

As you may be able to tell I am only collecting Crassula which have the same plant structure as the common jade for grafting purposes (Have already grafted a common jade with a 'gollem'), I hope to graft a plant with over 10 types of Crassula grafted onto a single trunk, a decade(s) long plan I'm sure!

Can anyone suggest other species of jade which share the same plant structure as the common Jade; Crassula Ovata?

I am missing 2 which I know of, 'Silver doller' and a Varigated version of Gollem and am having difficulty finding a vendor which sells either (I like in the UK).

If I propagate hundreds of thousands of common Gollem is there a chance it may turn variegated? (I've noticed a few of my variegated cuttings have gone back too normal).

Is the 'Gollem/Hobbit' the same as the red tipped 'Horned' jade? They look so similar and I'm well used to seller using tricks to try and sell 'rare' varieties which are in fact just unhealthy specimens of common varieties.

Comments (53)

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I am not very keen on grafts myself! I think the grafted Cacti look horrible hehe!

    Oh dam (Info about my purchases), they may not be viable for grafting then! Still, worth a try! Hehe... I shall do a search on these forums as you suggest thanks!

    Nice to hear you get some stunning colours in Ireland! I must admit it probably is due to my limited varieties which are likely normally a deep green? (Although I live in a Tower Block and they don't get the best sun).

    My plan is to have a large/mature plant of every variety of Crassula that I can find (A collection / obsession)...

    One plant will have every variety grafter upon it, if I have a plant with 10+ different varieties and managed to get it too flower it will be stunning, it's a little experiment / hobby that will likely last my lifetime...

    I must admit I researched extensively online if grafting was possible and got a massive 'not possible', not enough for me, I tried it and have had success :)

    I've done about 10 grafts and only 2 of them survived, but both are now very healthy...

    Here's a photo of my Common Jade and Gollum graft, I think it's pretty :)


  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Oh, there are some benefits to grafting, varieties which have mutations such as Variegated leaves have lower chlorophyll levels and so are weaker than then the non-variegated versions.

    So grafting a weaker plant onto a strong plant allows it to take energy from the more efficient part of the plant, this can be seen in plants where parts have fully lost their chlorophyll (Albino) but continue to grow due to the rest of the plant providing energy (Which the Albino part cannot produce).

    It can also be beneficial grafting a plant onto a stronger root stock (As some have strong roots and some weak), but I don't bother with that for hobby grafts (That's more for fruit trees).

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  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I must say, when I found article after article saying 'It's not possible', I replied "Challenge Accepted!"

    "not sure why you would want to do it. Is it for reasons of space? Or just to have a freak plant?"

    Boasting rights ;)

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Margaret knows lot about many jades - and has many different ones herself. I agree with what she says.

    I do not know much about grafting but believe that some of the reasons for grafting are 1: to have 'faster growth' - rootstock is much vigorous plant than grafted plant. 2: plants that lack chlorophyll not able to survive on their own. 3: propagate rare plants faster. 4: plants that are 'difficult' to grow - prone to root rot - may have better chance of surviving and grow faster...and many more reasons.

    Albino branches of many plants will continue growing if left on the plant itself, but most likely do not live too long on their own. It is suggested that they may slow down growth of mother plant, and some ppl just get rid of them. Albino parts seem to grow even slower too.

    I have C. o. Tricolor with couple of albino branches that I left on so far. They grow slow, but mother plant seems to grow same 'speed' as other Tricolors I have.

    These started to grow after I chopped/pruned mother plant first time. I have this plant since 2012, and has been pruned/chopped/propagated by branch cuttings 4 or 5 times. It grows very well. Some cuttings have produced occasional 'albino' (or almost albino) leave(s).

  • marguerite_gw Zone 9a
    6 years ago

    That last is a pretty, unmarked Tricolor, Rina. Hard to find those. Plenty around with those ugly brown marks. Have you discovered the secret? :)

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago

    Margaret

    Thank you. No, still did not :) Some ppl say to grow them indoors, but many do and still have some spots.

    I think this one is just luck - and I see a tiny spot on one of the leaves. Just about any Tricolor I have (and I have at least 20 of hem right now - all from cuttings) has some. Some more, some less but they are still there.

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    "Have you discovered the secret? :)"

    I don't think I have? From the looks of your unmarked Tricolour, Rina; you have! What a gorgeous specimen!!

    "I do not know much about grafting but believe that some of the reasons for grafting are..."

    Thanks, all your points are correct of course, when sunlight hits the leaf / chlorophyll it can create or destroy hormones which alter the way a plant grows (Such as initiating flowering), so albino plants will react differently to their environment (And may not receive the signal to grow vigorously).

    But that's why I love grafting so much, my common jade grows so vigorously that I often have to chop it back whereas my weaker plants grow very slowly, by grafting a weak plant onto a strong plant (Say replacing 10% of the plant with a weaker part but leaving 90% strong / vigorous) it will grow much faster / healthier than a 100% weak plant, as an added benefit the 'common' part of it may grow a little slower.

    I have a Albino clone myself, thanks for the nice photos!


  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Hehe, I also have about 10 Tricolour cuttings + Tricolour leaf clones + 10 Gollum cuttings (2 years old / much bigger).

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I would keep the mother leaf on that albino plantlet as long as possible - hopefully, it will grow some greener leaves for it to survive.

    Some Tricolor leaves will grow all green plants; 3 of the leaves in this photo are reverting to all green - at least so far, while other 3 are growing variegated:

    ETA: I just counted most of Tricolors I have - will not admit how many, lol.

    Few more grown from cuttings:

    I also prefer growing them on their own:
    - but also understand your 'need' to graft :) Good luck with this challenge - hope you'll post photos of results, successful or not.

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    "I just counted most of Tricolors I have - will not admit how many, lol."

    Hehe, be careful, so often am I suddenly overwhelmed by clones! On the plus side every clone has a chance of a mutation!

    This Christmas I will be giving my family some 4 year old Gollum clones which I've shaped so well over the years I'm finding it hard to part with them!

    I'm thinking of never removing a leaf without cloning it, going to be keeping a close eye on all my plants for mutations :D

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Oh, yeah! Since I took that photo this morning I have placed a small sheet of plastic under the mother leaf in a hope that when the soil is damp it will not cause the leaf to rot.

    I am kicking myself now, A fair few of my variegated clones reverted to 'pure green' and I pulled them out the pot (Seriously not needed), I went to pull one out and it was attached to the Albino one!!! (About the same size) but I damaged it! Had I left it I would have had a multi-stemmed plant that was 50% Green and 50% White (Cry).

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Lovely photos by the way, your plants are lucky to have such a caring owner ;)

    I do love the ones that grow on their own, have a couple of fairly mature ones myself, shall try and get a photo...

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Callum

    Thank you...:)

    I am not sure plastic under the leaf is good idea; I think that will possibly keep it moister rather than dryer. Mother leaf will eventually shrivel, dry up and detach itself. What I was referring to is not to rush with detaching plantlet too soon - I should have made it clear, sorry - many ppl get eager and want to repot, get rid of shrivelling leaf etc. too early. I leave them there until leaf actually detaches itself - may not 'look' fantastic with crispy-looking leaf, but until it is totally dry, it will keep feeding plantlet and roots. In case of albino, it is even more important to help it get 'food'. Different plantlets - see the dry leaves (2 at this moment):

    If you want to make sure leaf is not touching wet soil - and the soil shouldn't stay wet for long anyway - do not use plastic that will create more moisture-humidity. I would use much more inorganic mix than what I see in your photo, and put some gravel on top as top-dressing. IMO, much better than plastic.

    I grow all succulents in very gritty, inorganic mix. Top-dressing is often gravel just a bit bigger than gravel used for mix itself (photo above is just the mix: grit, perlite and some turface). Some ppl do not think top-dressing is good, but I have been using it on all my potted plants (not only succulents) without any problems at all.

    Please, can you post photo of your other plants? We all like to see pictures !:)

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Ah yes good point!

    I was thinking a piece of cloth or something would absorb the water and make it worse but plastic will be just as bad, new idea will be to cut a sliver of sponge (Kitchen sponge) that will cushion between the plastic and lift the leaf (just keeping it a few millimetres above the dry plastic) for air flow and such, thanks for the tip!

    (Sadly I've no gravel at the moment).

    If I am lucky it will sprout an additional stem (Fully green) again.

    Yeah my soil choice is very poor (Multi-purpose compost), I have about 1.5 inches of jagged stones lining the pot base to ensure their is not water pooling, to be honest my poor jades have to deal with drought rather than overwatering!

    My biggest issue with soil choice is root stability, all my semi-mature Jade plants have been shaped into single stem specimens (Bonsai) like tree's and their top-weight is an issue, I find they are much more stable in soil...

    Shall try to get a few photos soon, my mobile camera is not great and I can't find the connector for my proper camera (Doh!).

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Having trouble getting photos as it's late and the suns gone down, but I'll show yall anyway...

    This is my newest edition, it is labled 'crassula arborescens' but I am under the impression that is not its full name?


    Zoomed in a bit...


    Any idea on specifics? :)

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    This is my Gollum (Back and front).... although now I'm not sure if it's Gollum or Hobbit!

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    This is my Variegated... It is a quick grower, it grew so quickly that the weight caused the top to snap off, probably a good thing as I didn't want it to get too big!




  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    And last but not least, my oldest Jade (The cutting my mum gave me about 8 years ago...), from the looks of it I didn't rotate it enough this year and have taken a photo from it's bad side (Because it's good side has lost it's form).


  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    No no I love the replies thank you! I really want to master their care so any tips/tricks are welcome :)

    I did not realise they wired down bonsai roots, that explains a lot!

    At this point the only bonsai technique I have been practising is shaping its form, I am far too scared of trimming its roots! But hope to do so one day (The photo at the bottom of my oldest jade is probably about ready for such treatment).

    Wow.... 15-20inch Jade trunk diameter, that's impressive!!! I think my largest jade is likely 5 inches at best!!! (Probably less!)

    Edit: I assume trimming it's roots will significantly slow it's growth which is no good if the trunk is not thick enough?

  • marguerite_gw Zone 9a
    6 years ago

    Callum, Rina is right, that is a Bluebird, called Crassula arborescens Wavy Bluebird over here but Ripple Jade, I think, in the US. Blue Hale has the longest leaves of the C. arborescens jades, long and slender.

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Margaret

    Thank you for confirmation. I have that one too, and will make sure it has proper label :)


    Callum

    Measurements I gave are in cm!!! we use metric system in Canada and I thought you, in UK, too - not inches. I can only wish trunk was 15"...

    If I could make a suggestion: somehow, you need to figure out supplying more light to your plants. Ripple is compact, but other jades are etiolated. That is one of the reasons why they are top heavy. I keep all plants outside from Spring to late Fall, so they get as much sunlight as possible. They grow more compact - sets of leaves are closer together:

    Indoors, I have some supplemental lights, but there could be some etiolation. It isn't so easy to grow really compact succulents in cold climates:)

    In Summer, it is good idea to prune off etiolated parts, and let them grow in as much sunshine as possible for more of compact growth. Plant may not be as huge, but will look better IMO. And some branches should be pruned off anyway to 'control' the shape.

    Trimming some roots should be done when repotting, so it isn't something that is done very often. Depending on their condition, there could be very little trimming. For 'true bonsai', I believe wiring is needed to get that bonsai look...which includes shaped trunks and branches, reducing height and leaf size, tapering trunk that is wide at the soil level - at least that's what I think :)

    Btw: I wouldn't use piece of sponge under the leaf either: it will soak up extra water and release it back to plant. Just leave it as is - I don't think there is any need for extra protection, just proper watering.

  • marguerite_gw Zone 9a
    6 years ago

    Rina, keep an eye out for a Solana in all those Tricolor jades - I found one last summer, and I read where Nancy and Josh did at one time too.

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    How cool, I have a 'Wavy Bluebird', will also be labelling it correctly too! Thank you for the Identification!

    Oops oh CM! Yeah I'm so used to talking with people all over the world it's hard to keep track! (Although I misread as you certainly said 'cm'), That's a bit more reasonable hehe! Still thicker than mine though!

    Oh don't worry, the sponge will remain bone dry! (I'm very OCD that way) haha. It's only the size of a pea just to give the leaf a little lift (Plus it's a brand new sponge so will not absorb moisture so easily), I'll be careful, that Albino will be treated like a queen.

    Sadly I live in a Tower Block and have very limited space for plants! I live on the 9th floor and all my plants grow in weird ways (Due to the sun being significantly lower in the sky), I have a lot of very phallic looking cacti that grow horizontally towards the windows haha! I have to rotate my plants so often as they tend to grow sideways!

    I have built a partition wall in my living room and am hoping to make the part with the main windows into a conservatory (This summer was the first summer my plants spent in my half-built conservatory and they did very well!).

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago

    Margaret

    Thank you for the tip. Hope I'll eventually find one :) - but am not very sure if I'll be able to see the difference?

  • marguerite_gw Zone 9a
    6 years ago

    You'll know it immediately. The leaf colour is different, with the central variegation, but the green and the white just look of a different texture from the Tricolor variegation too. You'll know what I mean when you see it, Rina.



  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    So nice to see others speaking about their love of Jades (And plants in general).

    Do you think if I took many leaves from a Gollum which shows no signs of genetic variation (I.e. Variegated chlorophyll) and cloned them (Hundreds or thousands of clones) I might one day have a mutation such as Variegated?

    Or do these mutations only come from cross-pollination?

  • marguerite_gw Zone 9a
    6 years ago

    Maybe some variegates come from cross-pollination, but most variegated Gollums probably came about as sports on green ones. Hundreds or thousands of clones? Would you have room to keep these happy? Sounds like you have a nursery. Waiting patiently until you can buy one seems a better option to me otherwise.

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Indeed, I expect if I was simply hoping for a mutation it would likely go into the thousands and I may still never see a mutation! (In my lifetime).

    My plan is a bit cold hearted, my plants grow so vigorously I have to prune them back every year, I compost many leaves because I have no need to clone them, I was thinking of cloning them up until the point they grow a new plantlet, if the plantlet looks normal; compost it and instantly place a new clone/leaf in it's empty spot and start the process over.

    If I can fit say, 100 leaves in a single tray for cloning and make a shelf in my flat with enough space for 5 trays I could easily clone 500 leaves at a time (Although obviously I would likely find it hard harvesting 500 leaves without killing the mother plants).

    I tried the Nursery option once upon a time and 6 months later I had 300 house plants all growing strong, sadly it was not sustainable so I had to cut down my plant collection significantly (Lots of happy family members).

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago

    Callum

    If you don't mind me saying - again; your plants are showing some etiolation. So ..."my plants grow so vigorously I have to prune them back every year"... is partially just stretching - they are reaching for more sunlight. That is not the growth one would prefer. Some etiolation happens during winter, but that's why I suggested to prune etiolated parts off. Obviously, you should do what will please you - but etiolated plant doesn't look as good as compact does.

    Pruning every year is not a problem. If you are serious about growing bonsai or at least bonsai-like, it requires pruning more often. If you are just taking leaves off, that is not really enough to prune to shape plant.

    With enough light, branches will grow strong enough to be able to support themselves. Otherwise they are weak, thinner than they should be, and too long.

    I am not trying to criticize, so hope you can read into what I am saying.

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Your eyes may be deceived by their structure, I tend to prune my plants at an early stage to become etiolated (New word to me, did I use it right?), I remove a lot of side-shoots and concentrate on main-stems/trunk, rather than letting any side-shoot grow which runs the risk of needing to remove it later (When it has grown large and thus will cause a larger wound from removal and the plant would have wasted a lot of resources growing it).

    During the summer I am removing shoots growing from the base (And the first 10-20cm of the base) every week or two (What I mean by vigorous growth), and I use string / wire to curve the remaining branches as wanted.

    Although I removed all the string and wire yesterday to take photographs and to see how they fair without it, the last time I released them they quickly changed their form (Not woody enough).

    All done so that they stretch and become 'bigger' faster, once they reach the size I want I shall be pruning off the tips and make them bush out, I try to find the best balance between removing growth and negatively removing too much chlorophyll

    I dare not look up the average life-cycle of a Jade as I wish for these plants to be in my life for the next 65 years :D

    Obviously I would not have to deal with this issue if I purchased older specimens but almost all my Jades have been grown from a Leaf-clone (Myself).

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I don't see it as criticism! It's a difficult situation for me, I live in a Tower Block and have no garden, I can't really afford to buy grow lights (Or afford the electricity) so my plants are stuck with these conditions.

    You are right, no denying your points, just trying to give you a better understanding of the way I train my plants, to be honest I really neglected all my house plants this year; almost gave up on them all and many almost died, before I took my photos I had to remove loads of those shrivelled up leaves (The black husks) so my plants are a little poorly.

    Thankfully my successful graft and a trip to IKEA last week (finding of a new variety (Wavy Bluebird)), has re-ignited my passion!

    I really appreciate criticism, it's the only way to learn and although I reply (A lot) too you please see it as my way of asking more questions because I wish to pick your brains ;)

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Aka I am envious of your knowledge, I am really at hobby / beginner stage! So thank you, I've taken a lot of what you've said in and have already read your posts multiple times over (To let it all sink in).

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Thanks Callum...:)

    I understand your light limitations. I keep many succulents in my basement without natural light, so had to get some supplemental lighting. Or get rid of plants - instead, I got more!

    There is definitely cost associated with it. Lights themselves and the electricity they use. I have lights set up on timers. And reversed day and night: lights go on around 7pm and turn off around 7am. Cost of hydro here is almost half for those hours. I can do this only in the basement, any other spot I have is receiving daylight - whatever is available. So I try to keep plants that will do OK with less light on windowsills.

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Good idea! I was thinking of making a small part of my flat into a light area and just place my most special plants in there (Or ones that need some extra TLC).

    I've had to get rid of a few of my plants (Mostly Cacti) recently as my flats humidity was getting too high, and I spotted a laundrette the other day which might take some of my larger plants (A Yucca and a few others, each 6 foot tall).

    I've recently built a partition wall 3 feet away from my main windows and a massive shelf directly at window level so that I no longer need curtains (As closing the curtains cuts out the light) so hopefully that will improve the situation significantly).

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    This is my problem living in a Tower Block (54 different homes with no garden, people love a plant or two).

    People that are throwing out their plants leave them sitting on a shelf in the bin area/ground floor, I have found 100+ healthy plants in that area over 8 years lol, all I've nursed back too health, it's gotten a bit silly hehe!

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Hi again! Thank you again for the tips!

    I have decided I'm going to buy some nice heavy (Medium-Large) bonsai pots for the jades, replace the soil with better free draining soil and maybe even wire them down; hopefully forever eliminating my 'plants falling over' problem! Can't wait!

    Shall be reading the links on soil and water you provided before doing so ;)

    I got those 4 plants through the post today (All in perfect condition I'm amazed!) and thought you might enjoy the photos.




    Also, a bonus image, as I took this yesterday and love this little plant, it grows sooo slow...






  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Just don't look at the soil ;)

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Soil will be eventually replaced, right? :) Before you know it, you'll be living in a jungle.

    1sr plant looks like hardy succulent and best grown outdoors. Did it have a name?

    That last photo is a nice clump of haworthias I believe.

    I think you would need to prune your jades quite a bit to put them into bonsai pots - but that is just MO. And they wold need really good light to keep growing compact. Sorry for repeating myself.

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Oh a hardy succulent! How cool, It's labled as; 'Crassula Multicava' (I Assume that means multiple cultivars / no name? Although google says "fairy crassula, pitted crassula and London pride"), looks more like mini-cabbage leaves to me!

    Sadly I never bothered with getting the right soil but it shall be replaced (Or partly replaced) before this spring, it is now a priority ;)

    Looking forward to living in a jungle :D

    I will probably buy a few differently sized pot (Small, med, large), prune the roots in stages rather than hacking them back all at once, perhaps 1/4 at a time so I don't shock them (Over a few years perhaps).

    I won't go berserk but looking at your Jades (And a few other peoples) mine are in far too large pots (And all the wrong soil).

    "Sorry for repeating myself."

    No worries! Next year my plants will be getting significantly more sunlight (Once I build a new window - shelf for them, they won't know what him em! (It will be good sunlight hitting them).

    I now have 8 varieties of Jade and I'm getting a bit obcessed / addicted :D

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago

    If that is Crassula multicava, it isn't that hardy, only to about -4*C (maybe -5*C)

  • PRO
    Home
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Great thread with lots of information! I'm new to jades so all the tips being shared is helping me learn a lot.

    I would love growing a few more clones of my tricolor. A few leaves from my baby tricolor fell off, I think the shop kept them too dehydrated. So I decided to put each leaf in a different location to see which method is best for rooting. For the leaf sitting on top of soil, since it's a tricolor, does rooting surface need to actually be in the soil? I have it laying flat on the soil with the rooting end in the air because the leaf is curved lol. I'm just worried it won't root well because it's variegated. And I've never rooted jade leaves ever before! I just hope I get some extra tricolors from those leaves incase my baby mother plant doesn't make it :(!

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago

    I usually just prop them against side of the pot, or put small rock under to elevate tip, just enough that the part where it was attached is touching the potting mix surface. But you could stick it into mix, not too deep. Just about every leaf roots (if healthy enough) - in the photo I posted all rooted - but you have to wait & see if you get variegated plant or reversion.

    Callum G thanked rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
  • PRO
    Home
    6 years ago

    Ah I see, I wasn't sure if it would dry out too much if it wasn't at least touching the surface. Thank you again Rina! I hope they come out variegated. I wouldn't mind if one of them reverts, I have no plain green jades yet :) I'd love to find a solana like Marguerite suggested to watch out for. Your jades are already very large Rina, I have a feeling you may see some sports sooner or later!

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    So far, no sports but I keep hoping :). I have more whitish and yellowish leaves growing, but would love it if some 'special' variegation happened. My variegated are getting bigger, I kept just few from 1st 'chopping' that was in 2014. I have given many away. And I have quite a few smaller ones.

    When I started propagating leaves, they were all growing just green. Lately, they grow many variegated plants. I really do not know why, maybe just because plant feels like it, haha.

    Regular green jade leaves will grow very easily even just on a shelve (that's another reason I have so many :). Lately, I have been able to discard some leaves and small prunnings - there is not enough space to keep them all. Other jades seem to prefer touching the mix. Overall, jades are quite easy to propagate, some just take little longer.

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Hi Rina, thanks for answering Kvet's question; I thought I'd better leave it to you ;)

    Have you ever tried cross-pollinating Jades? None of my Jades have ever flowered so I'm unsure if they flower at similar times? When mine become mature enough to flower I intend to collect the pollen and store it in the fridge in a moisture free tube, and apply when another flowers?

    Just for funzies.

  • rina_Ontario,Canada 5a
    6 years ago

    No, I didn't. I have number of them flowering now, they are all C.ovata (green jades) but didn't even think about it. They are so easy to propagate that I really do not need to try seeds and since they are all same, I don't think I would get anything 'interesting'. I never saw any seeds either - I had few flowering last year too, at the same time. No seeds - but maybe because there were no pollinators? I do not know...

    Btw, I am not sure if plant needs to be really mature only to bloom. I have one flowering first time that have been totally naked - all leaves and branches pruned off in very late Dec. 2014 - that is blooming now. It was branch pruned off another plant that was few years in my possession and I do not know exactly how old it was. Here is photo of its progress during approx. 6.5mo:

    There are 2 branches now with few buds; here is 1 of them right now:

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Lovely photos thank you, never seen a mature branch taking root! They recover so fast :O

    As for pollination you're right, pollinating one Green Crassula Ovata with another Green Crassula Ovata will more than likely result in the same plant; you'd have to be the luckiest person on the planet for that method to throw out a new variant (The results will unlikely be good (Inbreeding))...

    What's even worse is that because Most Crassula Ovatas (Or succulents in general) are reproduced by clones their DNA is too similar (Normally identical) to successfully pollinate (And create a seed), if pollen with DNA contacts a flower with the same DNA the flower will die (To prevent wasted energy and inbreeding, as a seeds main job is variation and evolution).

    However, Hybridising two different species is different (So long as they share the same plant family (Crassula) and are close enough to still be compatible (Not always), same with grafting.

    If you got the pollen from something dissimilar (Noticeably different) it will certainly have different DNA, you could try and cross a Crassula Gollum with a Crassula Marginata and you could result in something entirely new (Crassula Gollum X Marginata), a deep red Gollum... yummy!

    Best way to do this is to ensure that bugs play no part in pollination, cover the flowers you wish to pollinate with a plastic sandwich bag (+elastic band), when the flowers are open collect pollen from one plant by hand and 'paint' it onto another flower (Delicately), then re-cover it and wait for the seed.

    If they flower at different times of the year you can pop that pollen in a container and store it in the fridge (Humidity is your enemy though, so some humidity cellulose packets will help).

    I've done it successfully with Orchids which flowered at different times of the year (It produced viable seeds) but I just didn't know how to germinate the seeds (As we said near the start of this nice conversation, no easy task).

  • Callum G
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    My Crassula Multicava arrived in flower, a tiny plant, so I think you're right about age not being the trigger, I'm guessing my plants don't get enough light to flower :(

    I will have to research what triggers flowering and set up a grow room so that I can trigger them when I need too :)