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Does this Master bath work better?

cpartist
6 years ago
last modified: 6 years ago

I wasn't 100% happy with the master bath. the problem was where to put towels when in the shower, and not having doors banging into each other.

this is the original layout. the problem is you open the door to the bathroom and have to walk past the door to the toilet to turn on the lights. If I switch the door, then you have to close the bathroom door to walk into the toilet. I could have just switched the toilet so it is on the other wall, but that creates another problem. While the wall of the shower next to the tub is a pony wall and I could hang a towel bar there, the only way to access the towel from the shower would be to step out of the shower first to grab the towel. If I switch the toilet, I have no wall to hang a towel for the shower.

So, I came up with the idea of switching the toilet closet with the bath. that would allow me to then switch the direction of the door for the shower, so I could then reach out of the shower for a towel. It would still give me a wall, (actually 2 walls) to hang towels for the bath. I can switch the door swing into the bath so now the light switches are on the side wall where the linen closet is. And I now enter the bathroom looking at the vanity and tub as opposed to the toilet closet/shower and tub. While the door t the bathroom would have to be at least partly closed to open the shower door, I think that's less of a problem since the shower is only used 2x a day when DH showers and then when I shower. (Sometimes it's only used 1x a day. ;) )

Does this work better? For scale, the vanity is 72" as is the tub. the toilet closet is 3' x 5' and the shower measurements are 5' x 3'4".

FYI, I cannot move walls at all, nor add more space. Going to x-post in bathrooms too.

Comments (38)

  • gwlake
    6 years ago

    Not your question. But how do you plan to turn the faucet on in the tub. That is an awkward reach.

    cpartist thanked gwlake
  • Lavender Lass
    6 years ago

    Good point about the tub. What if you flip it...and add some towel hooks by the shower door?


    cpartist thanked Lavender Lass
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  • gwlake
    6 years ago

    I don't think you can put long enough screws for a bar or hooks with a pocket door.

    cpartist thanked gwlake
  • Lavender Lass
    6 years ago

    Gwlake- That's true, but maybe heavier 3M hooks would work?


    cpartist thanked Lavender Lass
  • mrspete
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    This probably isn't an answer you want, but you're illustrating why toilets just don't belong in closets. The doors, the lights, the small and difficult to clean spaces -- more expense, more square footage, yet less usable space -- they just don't work.

    If I were arranging this bathroom, I'd turn the toilet 90 degrees and set it next to the wall shared with the hallway. This would also allow space to add a 2' wide linen tower between the shower and the toilet, which could include towel bars on the doors.

    I'd also flip the door swing so that as you enter the bathroom you're oriented towards the sink, the most-used item in the bathroom. This has the positive benefit of placing the toilet slightly out of view behind the bathroom door.

    If you're leaving the toilet in a closet, I would swap the shower and the closet as you showed in your second pix. It really just rearranges the problem, but it would allow you to add a small window in the toilet closet.

    I don't share gwlake's concerns about reaching the tub faucet. Most bathroom vanities are only 18" deep, so the tub's water source will be place in an indentation, but it won't be buried so deeply as to be difficult to reach.

    If anything, you might consider "chopping off the corner" of the vanity -- no, chopping is too strong a word: clipping. I mean just take off an inch or two from the countertop so that you won't have a sharp 90 degree angle that could be a bruise magnet. Likely this tiny detail would go unnoticed by anyone who comes in to see the room.

    And off topic, but related to the depth of the sink/vanity: Last week we were in Florida and stayed in a wonderful resort. I kept wondering why the sink /vanity /mirror felt "odd". It took me about two days to realize that the vanity was 24" deep. The sink and the wide-set faucet were both large, and they'd used a kitchen-wide vanity to accommodate them (plus they still had about 4" between the countertop edge and the sink). I didn't like it. It placed me farther from the mirror than I'm used to being, farther from the faucet too -- and I found it uncomfortable. I couldn't lean towards the mirror as closely as I'm used to doing. In the spirit of full disclosure, I am a very small person; other people might not dislike it as much as I did. It made me determined to use a narrow vanity in our upcoming build!

  • chisue
    6 years ago

    I like the toilet room on an outside wall so it can have a window. (Consider need to insulate against freezing.)

    A shower door *can* swing in as well as out. It has to be able to swing out to meet code.

    Your tub will be a pain to enter and exit unless you free up space with pedestal sinks.

    Is this a new build? Are you stuck with these dimensions for the bathroom?

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    GW asked: Not your question. But how do you plan to turn the faucet on in the tub. That is an awkward reach.

    the style of tup hasn't been determined. Additionally we will probably wind up with a 66" tub instead of a 72" one. When I decide on the exact style, I will place the faucets where I will be able to reach them. this was drawn by a draftsman. ('nuff said. lol)

    Lavender Lass, did you even look at the redo of the bathroom where I switched the shower with the toilet? Your suggestions are moot if you look at my redo!

    I don't think you can put long enough screws for a bar or hooks with a pocket door.

    Actually if I decide to keep the original way I had my bath (upper photo) and not switch to the new idea (lower photo in my first post) then I still could put hooks on the door because the wall would be reinforced. However, that was not my question.

  • Lavender Lass
    6 years ago

    Above, I said...." I think putting the toilet back by the tub is going to make it more awkward...and maybe a little cramped."


    cpartist thanked Lavender Lass
  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    This probably isn't an answer you want, but you're illustrating why toilets just don't belong in closets. The doors, the lights, the small and difficult to clean spaces -- more expense, more square footage, yet less usable space -- they just don't work.

    I don't clean. LOL. But seriously, we like a toilet closet (helps keep the odors inside the toilet closet for one) and it's the same square footage as a pony wall would be. I know you don't like them MrsPete and take your comments under advisement. We have one in our condo and for us it works great.

    If I were arranging this bathroom, I'd turn the toilet 90 degrees and set it next to the wall shared with the hallway. This would also allow space to add a 2' wide linen tower between the shower and the toilet, which could include towel bars on the doors.

    I personally would not want to walk in and have the toilet the first thing I see when I enter the bathroom, even if the door were facing the vanities. Additionally I really do not like linen closets in my bathroom. I have that here in NY and just don't like having to go into the bathroom just to get sheets.

    I have designed the linen closet right outside my bathroom so I can take my sheets and pillowcases into my bedroom right there, and my towels into my bathroom.

    I'd also flip the door swing so that as you enter the bathroom you're oriented towards the sink, the most-used item in the bathroom.

    that is exactly what I did with the new bathroom version. I agree with you that walking in and seeing the vanities is so much nicer. :)

    If you're leaving the toilet in a closet, I would swap the shower and the closet as you showed in your second pix. It really just rearranges the problem, but it would allow you to add a small window in the toilet closet.

    I like the idea of adding a small window in the toilet closet!

    I don't share gwlake's concerns about reaching the tub faucet. Most bathroom vanities are only 18" deep, so the tub's water source will be place in an indentation, but it won't be buried so deeply as to be difficult to reach.

    Since it will be a claw foot of some type, I intend to put the faucet either on the left or centered behind the tub. I agree with you, it won't be a problem.

    If anything, you might consider "chopping off the corner" of the vanity -- no, chopping is too strong a word: clipping. I mean just take off an inch or two from the countertop so that you won't have a sharp 90 degree angle that could be a bruise magnet. Likely this tiny detail would go unnoticed by anyone who comes in to see the room.

    Excellent point. I intend to do just that since I'm the one usually with the bruise marks on my hips.

    And off topic, but related to the depth of the sink/vanity: Last week we were in Florida and stayed in a wonderful resort. I kept wondering why the sink /vanity /mirror felt "odd". It took me about two days to realize that the vanity was 24" deep. The sink and the wide-set faucet were both large, and they'd used a kitchen-wide vanity to accommodate them (plus they still had about 4" between the countertop edge and the sink). I didn't like it. It placed me farther from the mirror than I'm used to being, farther from the faucet too -- and I found it uncomfortable. I couldn't lean towards the mirror as closely as I'm used to doing. In the spirit of full disclosure, I am a very small person; other people might not dislike it as much as I did. It made me determined to use a narrow vanity in our upcoming build!

    I have experienced the same thing as you and hated it! I too am not a very tall person (5'3", okay almost 3") and like you prefer a narrower vanity and a smaller sink. Excellent reminder.

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    chisue wrote: I like the toilet room on an outside wall so it can have a window. (Consider need to insulate against freezing.)

    thank you chisue. You and MrsPete both suggested the window. I like that idea and will see if it can be added. If not, what I was planning on doing is what I did in my condo, which is to have frosted glass doors for the toilet closet. It lets additional light in, but you can't see what's going on in there. (thankfully)

    As for freezing, I am in SW FL so won't have that problem.

    A shower door *can* swing in as well as out. It has to be able to swing out to meet code.

    that is what we have in our condo and it works great.

    Your tub will be a pain to enter and exit unless you free up space with pedestal sinks.

    We will have a minimum of a 45" space (if I use a 21" deep vanity) to enter the tub. that is almost 4 feet of space to get in and out of the tub. I don't think we will need more than that.

    Is this a new build? Are you stuck with these dimensions for the bathroom?

    Yes to both questions. :)

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    LL said: Above, I said...." I think putting the toilet back by the tub is going to make it more awkward...and maybe a little cramped."

    I missed that LL. My apologies.

    Why do you think it might be more awkward?

    the only thing I did was switch where the toilet and shower were. I didn't change any of the dimensions, including the door to get into the shower and the door to get into the toilet closet. I would think it might be a problem if I were using a regular door to the toilet closet, but I can't see it being a problem with the pocket door?


  • mary8153
    6 years ago

    I like LL's second drawing the best. (toilet up against hall wall). One thing that I find important is to separate the dry areas from the wet areas, so I think the shower needs to stay next to the tub. Of course this may be more important up north where we wear socks more often but its something to think about.
    As far as towel hooks go. I'm sure there are ways to attach towel hooks to a pocket door wall.


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  • Lavender Lass
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    As you said, you use the toilet more often than the shower....so why scoot past the tub any more than you have to?

    If it were me, I'd rather have the glass shower by the tub and the window. More light and just seems nicer not bathing right by the toilet...even with a door.

    I like this idea, with toilet 'flipped' and door opening against it. Then you have view of sinks, tub, window, shower glass and not toilet. Just my two cents :)

    As for faucet....maybe like this, but with vanity slid over and tub under window.

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I like LL's second drawing the best. (toilet up against hall wall). One thing that I find important is to separate the dry areas from the wet areas, so I think the shower needs to stay next to the tub. Of course this may be more important up north where we wear socks more often but its something to think about.
    thanks Mary, and that's a good point. In our tub now because it's a jetted tub, we get out and walk over to the shower which is right next to it to actually clean ourselves off. We don't use soap in the jetted tub because we don't want to clog the jets. However, the new tup will also have a hand shower attached to it and no jets. Something like this style or the style that LL posted is what I'm thinking:

    As far as towel hooks go. I'm sure there are ways to attach towel hooks to a pocket door wall.

    the problem is if I switch the toilet like LL is suggesting, then no there isn't room for towel hooks where she's showing. Or if there is, it's only room for one towel at most. We are two people and the biggest problem in my condo is I didn't account for towel hooks so every time I want to shower, I have to walk across the room, grab my towels and put them over the tub. DH has a free standing towel bar right next to the shower and I hate it. I know this is a first world problem but I do want to avoid it next time.

  • Lavender Lass
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Personally, I'd have the robe on the hook....as I said 3M has some pretty ones, even look like crystal knobs. Or maybe two hooks, one below the other? Or maybe lay one towel over the edge of the tub?

    cpartist thanked Lavender Lass
  • Oaktown
    6 years ago

    I like lavender's most recent layout, the light switches can go on the side of the closet.

    We also have towels on bars on our shower pony wall, but a hook just outside the shower door. Towel goes on the hook when I go in the shower, when done it's back on the bar to dry. Had a similar set up at our old house so we're used to doing it this way, though.

    Another possibility, you could put a towel bar on the glass door. I know some folks don't care for that look, though.

    cpartist thanked Oaktown
  • Lavender Lass
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Or you could do as MrsPete suggested...and eliminate the water closet in favor of easier access to linens. Maybe even make the shower a few inches longer, so door doesn't swing quite so close to the tub.

    This creates a nicer/larger vanity area and room for storage there, too Just another possibility :)

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    As you said, you use the toilet more often than the shower....so why scoot past the tub any more than you have to?

    I agree, in a perfect world. Sigh.

    If it were me, I'd rather have the glass shower by the tub and the window. More light and just seems nicer not bathing right by the toilet...even with a door.

    I like this idea, with toilet 'flipped' and door opening against it. Then you have view of sinks, tub, window, shower glass and not toilet. Just my two cents :)

    I do too but then I have no where to hang towels

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Personally, I'd have the robe on the hook....as I said 3M has some pretty ones, even look like crystal knobs. Or maybe two hooks, one below the other? Or maybe lay one towel over the edge of the tub?

    I like lavender's most recent layout, the light switches can go on the side of the closet.

    We also have towels on bars on our shower pony wall, but a hook just outside the shower door. Towel goes on the hook when I go in the shower, when done it's back on the bar to dry. Had a similar set up at our old house so we're used to doing it this way, though.

    Another possibility, you could put a towel bar on the glass door. I know some folks don't care for that look, though.

    I actually do not have towel bars for my towels but beautiful hooks. I don't have towel bars because DH's idea of hanging a towel on a towel bar is just to toss it any which way. Hence the solution was towel hooks. I have small towel bars by the sink for the hand towels but it's kind of hard to make a huge mess of a small hand towel. :)

    I will have to check with the builder as to what size that wall will be between the shower and toilet and whether it is wide enough for two hooks. I would not be happy with one. If it is wide enough, then I can leave the toilet closet where it is and just switch it to the opposite wall. I'm sure my builder would be happier too.

    As for draping towels across the tub, I'm tired of having to step out of the shower to grab my towel. I want to just reach over and grab it.

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Or you could do as MrsPete suggested...and eliminate the water closet in favor of easier access to linens. Maybe even make the shower a few inches longer, so door doesn't swing quite so close to the tub.

    This creates a nicer/larger vanity area and room for storage there, too Just another possibility :)

    I do not like having the linen closet in my bathroom. Actually, I hate it. LOL.

    And as mentioned, we like the toilet in a separate closet. It means I don't have to look at the toilet and it also means that it um cuts down on the smell in the bathroom since the door is closed and it has its own exhaust fan. :)

    Right now the one sticking point will be if we have enough room for 2 hooks by the shower. If we do then I will keep the shower where it is and just switch the toilet to the opposite wall. I would need about 8" - 10" for the hooks.

    thank you everyone because it is making me think hard about it. I just assumed the space would be too small for hooks, but now that I'm measuring, it might actually work.

  • autumn.4
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    Just an example of a Double hook.

    My boys each have their own double hook but only ever hang them on one side. They are deep enough that they do hold the towel well. Food for thought if you run into a tight space.

    cpartist thanked autumn.4
  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    I like those too Autumn. Not sure what kind of hooks I'd do, but being I have bath sheets, I don't want to hang two on even hooks like that. they really need their own hook.

  • autumn.4
    6 years ago

    My layout is nearly identical to what LL drew except we do not have a tub or that linen closet. . Door open hides toilet. Door closed you have it all to yourself. Either way it's fairly private.

    Could you put a towel bar on the fixed portion of the shower door? Then you would only need room for one hook. My hook is on the very small wall between shower and toilet. I doubt it would fit two. I actually grab my towel before I get in the shower and drape it over the back end of the shower. I don't like opening the door to grab it letting all that nice hot air out. Our shower door opens out and it opens toward the middle so you can get your towel from the towel bar vs the end.

    It works but yes I'd like to have more space or options. On the whole it doesn't bother me though.


    cpartist thanked autumn.4
  • Oaktown
    6 years ago

    If you use a sliding door instead of a pocket door on the toilet room, you could add hooks on the outside of the door.

    cpartist thanked Oaktown
  • Vith
    6 years ago

    For either of your first post pics, use a pocket door on the bathroom entrance, and you can put a light switch on the right hand side.


    For towel racks on pocket door walls, either anchor them to the studs in the wall or use tap and lock drywall anchors. In either case use screws long enough but not too long so they engage but don't touch the door.


    cpartist thanked Vith
  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Could you put a towel bar on the fixed portion of the shower door? Then you would only need room for one hook.

    thank you! I could not on the fixed portion of the shower door, but on the pony wall. (there is no fixed portion of the door. I decided on the pony wall so I wouldn't have to squeegee as much glass every day. However as I mentioned already, DH's idea of hanging a towel is to toss it over a towel bar so I only use hooks for our big towels.

    If you use a sliding door instead of a pocket door on the toilet room, you could add hooks on the outside of the door.

    I'm not understanding what you mean?

    For either of your first post pics, use a pocket door on the bathroom entrance, and you can put a light switch on the right hand side.

    that is definitely a solution but one I am trying to avoid since I really dislike pocket doors. the only doors I dislike more than pocket doors are slider and bi-fold doors. LOL.

    For towel racks on pocket door walls, either anchor them to the studs in the wall or use tap and lock drywall anchors. In either case use screws long enough but not too long so they engage but don't touch the door.

    My builder is not concerned about putting hooks or a towel bar on the pocket door wall. :) thank you!

    I've written the builder to ask him how wide the wall would be if I switch the toilet to the other wall. I'll be sure to let everyone know if hooks will be doable. :)

  • gwlake
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    I am glad it is working out for you. Just an FYI my plumber is doing the fixed faucet through the tap holes of my clawfoot tub I use my tub every day and he said it is better than the faucet line running free over the tub. Something to think about as you decide faucet location.

    cpartist thanked gwlake
  • mrspete
    6 years ago

    Opinions aside, turning the toilet and eliminating the toilet closet definitely saves square footage. Lavender Lass drew out exactly what I was imagining, and you can see that it saves space because the bathroom's pathway allows the necessary space in front of the toilet. It gives you more space around the toilet as well as the storage space; since this is a retirement house, you may want to place grab bars in this area, and that space may be welcome. Located behind a door, it's not going to be the first thing you see when you enter the room, and a vent fan can take care of "odors" just as easily with or without being in a closet.

    I hear you when you say you don't want to go into the bathroom to fetch sheets. I've always subscribed to the keep-items-where-they're-used theory. I store my extra bed linens in a cedar chest at the foot of my bed (it's an antique I inherited from my grandfather). However, you're not required to store your linens all in one place. A small linen closet INSIDE the bathroom will let you keep towels right there where they're used -- very convenient.

    I love my 2' wide bathroom closet: On the bottom is an open space that holds a cheap plastic hamper. The first shelf holds two stacks of bath towels, the shelf above stores extra toiletry items and a basket of washcloths, and the top shelf (difficult to reach -- you have 4" on me) is reserved for beach towels and emergency toilet paper.

    I continue to think the tub's placement is fine, and that turquoise tub is wonderful !

    I also don't see that the shower will be difficult to access at all. The door is close to the tub, but it swings clear of it. However, I agree with the poster above who says that a sliding door will eliminate this problem altogether AND will give you a place to hang the towel on the sliding door. This seems to be the best answer.

    OR consider doing away with the door altogether and go for a barrier-free shower. Since this is a retirement house, that seems like the best idea of all. Your shower's large enough to handle the necessary linear drain.

    As for towel hooks, I've never had them, but do the towels dry as quickly as they would on a traditional towel rod? It seems that they'd stay damp because they're "bunched up" instead of "flattened out".



    cpartist thanked mrspete
  • autumn.4
    6 years ago

    Oh I see now that is a pony wall. That will work and sorry if you had already mentioned that and I missed it. Our linens are not in the bathroom but right outside the pocket door in our closet - just a reach away and I do find that works just fine for us.

    Mrs pete-in my experience they do not work as well. In the summer I do hang my towel over the shower door so it can dry out thoroughly as it does still stay damp on the hook. If we'd have had room I'd have done a bar. But in Florida I'd imagine they have the a/c on consistently where you may not have that problem. We are in MI and don't have the humidity all the time - so a/c doesn't run all the time.


  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago
    last modified: 6 years ago

    thank you GW. that's good to know. I'm not married to one way or another as to how the plumbing is done for the tub, only that I want some sort of clawfoot or old fashioned looking tub.

    MrsPete, I do see what LL did for the toilet. I just still don't like it. I am plumbing for grab bars in case it's ever needed and if push came to shove, I could always remove the closet completely. that is the other reason I'm realizing it's better where it is than moving it closer to the shower.

    I hear you when you say you don't want to go into the bathroom to fetch sheets. I've always subscribed to the keep-items-where-they're-used theory. I store my extra bed linens in a cedar chest at the foot of my bed (it's an antique I inherited from my grandfather).

    that is definitely a special thing to have.

    However, you're not required to store your linens all in one place. A small linen closet INSIDE the bathroom will let you keep towels right there where they're used -- very convenient.

    Having them right outside the bathroom is also very convenient. toilet paper will be stored in a small cabinet inside the toilet area and under my vanity will be drawers or pull out shelves. Both vanities will have medicine cabinets for the smaller items we seem to have.

    My closet will hold our hampers. Notice the plural. I have learned over the years that having 3 separate ones works better. Extra towels will be on a train towel rack above the tub somewhere.

    I continue to think the tub's placement is fine, and that turquoise tub is wonderful !

    thanks. I do agree with you especially when I go down to a 66" tub. I LOVE the turquoise too but am actually thinking of doing red. I'm thinking the bathroom will be black,white and red but am not quite sure yet.

    I also don't see that the shower will be difficult to access at all. The door is close to the tub, but it swings clear of it. However, I agree with the poster above who says that a sliding door will eliminate this problem altogether AND will give you a place to hang the towel on the sliding door. This seems to be the best answer.

    Oh, duh to me! I thought the poster meant a sliding door for the toilet area. (smacking my head) LOL. Yes that would work. I was thinking of a door like I have now that swings in and out.

    OR consider doing away with the door altogether and go for a barrier-free shower. Since this is a retirement house, that seems like the best idea of all. Your shower's large enough to handle the necessary linear drain.

    I am definitely doing curbless and that linear drain is already factored into my plumbing needs for the shower. As for doing away with the door, I could eliminate it in the future if needed but I hate those showers without doors because I am always cold in them. the door does help to keep the heat inside.

    As for towel hooks, I've never had them, but do the towels dry as quickly as they would on a traditional towel rod? It seems that they'd stay damp because they're "bunched up" instead of "flattened out".

    Well DH never flattens them out. LOL. If you drape them in such a way that they aren't bunched up, I think they dry just as quickly. those double hooks like Autumn showed are perfect for that because they help spread it out. Or maybe it's like Autumn just said and it's because we almost always have our AC on. Hmmm, I'll have to do a "test" when I get back to FL at the end of August.

    Oh I see now that is a pony wall. That will work and sorry if you had already mentioned that and I missed it

    Please, no need to apologize. there's a lot of posts already and a lot of reading. What I may wind up doing is the hooks where I said, and then a towel rod on the pony wall.

    Again, thank you everyone for your help. It definitely is helping me finalize my plans and ideas.

  • stellaalto
    6 years ago

    I just wanted to comment that the thought you guys put into the smallest details is amazing! I am learning so much from all of you. I had never thought about towel rack locations or faucet positions!

    cpartist thanked stellaalto
  • stellaalto
    6 years ago

    Cpartist: I am also having my toilet in an enclosed room and hadn't given much thought on the type of door. I see that you have a pocket door in your plan. May I ask why you decided to go with pocket door in lieu of standard hinged door?


    cpartist thanked stellaalto
  • jackson2348
    6 years ago

    You can have hooks installed on your shower door if you don't have wall space. Example:


    cpartist thanked jackson2348
  • Lavender Lass
    6 years ago

    So....a red clawfoot tub with black and white? Maybe with silver legs instead of gold.....

    And maybe something like this with it?



  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Yep, a red tub with chrome LL. I'm thinking maybe a double slipper, where it dips in the middle and both ends are up.

    Haven't decided quite on the rest of the bathroom yet. thinking a dark cherry cabinet, undermount sinks and built in medicine cabinets. Looking to continue the craftsman feel. A patterned "rug" out of tile on the floor.

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    Cpartist: I am also having my toilet in an enclosed room and hadn't given much thought on the type of door. I see that you have a pocket door in your plan. May I ask why you decided to go with pocket door in lieu of standard hinged door?

    My choice would be either a pocket door or a door that swings both ways. I have the swinging door that swings both ways now and it works well. You want to have a door where if something happened, help could get in to help you. A pocket door or a door that can swing both ways will do that.

    the problem with a regular hinged door in a small bath like mine is that it uses too much room when opening which is why I chose the pocket door this time and not the swinging door.

    If you have the room and decide on a hinged door, make sure it opens outward so if you or anyone else ever needs help, you can get into the closet.

    Additionally, what I did in my condo was I made the door frosted glass to let in more light. I love that and plan to do something similar this time around.

  • cpartist
    Original Author
    6 years ago

    thank you Jackson. I had to run before so sorry I didn't post earlier. I'm not sure I'd like hooks on the glass.