Am I a wild/native daisy & if so, what kind?

LibbyLiz

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Judy_B_ON(Ontario 5B)

Looks like chamomile to me, a non native weed.

Here is a link that might be useful: Chamomile

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LibbyLiz

Uh-oh! A weed you say? But I thought Chamomile was an herb. But then some/most herbs can spread like weeds, so I assume it will take over my flower garden?

I thought perhaps it was Chamomile & when I showed it to a friend she thought it was some sort of Daisy. Darn!

Thanks for the info!

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Judy_B_ON(Ontario 5B)

A weed is any plant growing where you don't want it. Kentucky blue grass is a weed if in your flower bed and not a weed if in your lawn. Lupines are weeds if in the lawn and not weeds if in the flower bed.

Chamomile can be grown as an herb and the flowers are used to make tea. Some people use it as a lawn substitute. It is spready, but if you like it, keep it.

BTW, "Daisy" is not a particular flower, it is a generic descriptive term, usually referring to any flower with white petals and a yellow centre, though many daisies come in other colours. Most of the composite family, including chamomile, could be described as "daisies".

Use the URL below to access the USDA plant database. Type in "daisy" as the common name in the search field. You will get several hundred different plants.

Here is a link that might be useful: USDA database

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moonwolf23(8)

i have one of those in my yard, i don't think its chamomile. I think its a wild daisy. It looks a little different from most of the wild daisy that grow abudantly in my yard and have to be yanked repeatedly or they'll take over everything.

chamomile is supposed to be fragrant try sniffing it.

might be fleabane or ok mind went blank.

try posting it on the weed forum or the name that plant forum. the herb forum will know if its chamomile.

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well_drained(z6a MA)

In eastern Mass. at least, the most common plant that meets the 'daisy' archetype (Jungian perhaps? It seems like kids know how to draw them without actually seeing one) -- fairly large flower, white petals, yellow center (I apologize to the botanists cringing at my inaccurate use of these terms for composites) -- is the oxeye daisy, a non-native. The easiest way to identify it is the depression in the center of the yellow (which is lacking from the flowers in the picture from Utah). Asters and fleabanes, while they also may have white petals and yellow centers, are generally too small to fit my concept of a daisy. My field guide's description of wild chamomile is consistent with the flowers and foliage in the photo. (Oxeye daisy leaves are much wider and lobed/serrated.) Other daisy-like flowers in my guide (albeit only an eastern U.S guide) are: sneezeweed yarrow, mayweed, feverfew, and scentless chamomile, all non-natives to this area. (Sorry, too lazy to put in latin names, but they are available upon request.)

-- wd

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ahughes798(z5 IL)

It's chamomile. Not native, and it can be very weedy. april

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Vera_EWASH(z5 EasternWA)

That is false chamomile... mayweed AKA Dogfennel
Very stinky...not like apple scent from crushed Chamomile blooms...Pineapple weed looks simular in foliage but blooms don't have ray petals, center is more elongated and whole plant smells of pineapple.

Vera

Here is a link that might be useful: Mayweed

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Vera_EWASH(z5 EasternWA)

Forget to mention the latin name has been changed to or was changed from Anthemis cotula
Vera

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flowersandthings(MidAtlantic 6/7)

No I'm not a native I'm chamomile! :)

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Judy_B_ON(Ontario 5B)

Moon wolf, "wild daisy" is not a useful term. "Daisy" is mostly a descriptive term, not a botanical name -- people use it to describe the composites with white petals and yellow centres (there are hundreds of different plants that fit that description). Many plants have "daisy" in their common name including English daisy, Daisy Fleabane, Ox eye daisy, Shasta Daisy, African daisy and so on. Some of these are native, some are weeds, some are highly desirable horticultural plants.

The "wild daisy" in your yard is likely a fleabane or ox-eye daisy, they have quite different leaves than chamomile.
And there are several types of chamomile, some scented, some not. The original poster will need a field guide to identify exactly which plant she has.

Below is a link to some chamomiles, you can search the data base for more.

Here is a link that might be useful: Chamomile

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LibbyLiz

Nevermind about this plant. I ripped 'her' right out of the ground & kicked 'her' butt to the curb!!! LOL

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