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debrak2008

When special milk is needed....

debrak2008
10 years ago

My flat biscuits thread got me thinking about this question.

What do you do when "special" milk is needed for a recipe? We always have skim/fat free milk in the house. Many recipes call for whole, half n half, or buttermilk. Sometimes I will buy these if I have a recipe planned ahead. Usually only a small amount is needed so what do you do with the rest? I hate it when I end up throwing it out. Also, if I want to make something like biscuits without pre planning I have to just use the skim on hand.

How does everyone handle this? The only thing I can think of is to freeze some of these milks but I'm not sure that would work very well.

Comments (23)

  • ruthanna_gw
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I always have cans of evaporated milk in the pantry to use for recipes requiring more richness than our usual 1% milk. It has a sort of cooked flavor that I don't find unpleasant. If I don't use the balance of the can, I'll use it in creamed soups, white sauce for creamed spinach or another vegetable or as a base for a creamy salad dressing.

    Evaporated milk is used in many pumpkin pie recipes so most grocery stores will have it at a loss leader in the weeks before Thanksgiving. I'll buy a case from the store with the lowest price and that will last us for a long time.

  • KatieC
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    We always have evap. milk in the pantry also, and I do the same as Ruthanna...stock up when it's .78/can. It makes good fake sweetened condensed milk, too.

    I keep a can of powdered buttermilk around, but you can sub buttermilk with a tablespoon of lemon juice to a cup of milk. Let it stand for a few min. We've been making kefir and I've been using it in biscuits instead of buttermilk. Works well.

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  • annie1992
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I usually have skim milk and use it in baking no matter what kind of milk is called for. I sometimes have buttermilk and sometimes sub yogurt for it, because I make yogurt and usually have that on hand.

    I mostly ignore the recommendations that call for cream or whole milk, but things like pumpkin pie I'll use evaporated milk. Like others, I always have some on hand.

    If I'm making cream soup and using skim milk, but want a thicker texture I use a few mashed potatoes to thicken it, the flavor doesn't seem to compete with anything, at least nothing I've made yet.

    Annie

  • Olychick
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I keep a box of this on the shelf. It tastes exactly like fresh, no off flavor, no cooked flavor, needs no refrigeration until opened and works well enough when 1/2 and 1/2 is called for in many recipes. I use unsweetened soy milk for most things but sometimes want to use dairy in recipes.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Shelf stable milk

  • ann_t
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I always use either heavy cream or buttermilk in biscuits and scones. And I use butter for the fat.

    ~Ann

  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I solve the problem by going to the grocery store all the time.
    Yes, I will hop in the car and screech up to the store for one item.

    I do keep buttermilk around, however, as it is usable in baked goods for at least a month or more past the expiration date. Just shake it up well before measuring. Offhand, I can't remember ever throwing buttermilk out as there are so many baked goods to use it in and it lasts so long.

  • foodonastump
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    "...but you can sub buttermilk with a tablespoon of lemon juice to a cup of milk."

    KatieC - I've used that substitution countless times, but nothing ever seemed to "happen." Then one day recently I had some whole milk to use up (rather than our normal fat free) and it quickly thickened right up. I'm wondering if the fat is required to make this work right?

    I like to keep shelf stable whole milk on hand but unfortunately lately I can't seem to find single serving kid size, only quarts. I probably just have to look harder.

  • laceyvail 6A, WV
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I do know that milk freezes quite well. My mother used to stock up when she knew family was going to be visiting and she always froze it. I don't know if buttermilk freezes.

  • sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    All of it freezes fine. Buttermilk might separate a bit but fine for baking. I just tossed out a few small containers in the freezer to make room for better things. I don't keep any milk anymore. We use yogurt for everything. I do have a tin in the pantry and have soy and goat milk in powder form....for guests that need choices.
    Using yogurt i just guess, adding a dollop or two to water in a lidded jelly jar and shake.

    One thing i really miss is an English style clotted cream from Holland that is no longer imported as of a few months ago. Nothing fat-free about that! But a real treat once or twice a year on desserts and scones....it will be missed.

  • Cathy_in_PA
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I hear my mom tsking, tsking, when I throw something out Debra:) And I'm laughing, Bumblebeez!

    I freeze buttermilk all the time. I know that there are probably some purists who may give this a thumbs down, but I've never noticed a difference in taste. In fact, I freeze 1 cup portions flat in ziploc bags and whisk if there is any separation when thawed.

    Cathy in SWPA

  • debrak2008
    Original Author
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    Thank you all for the great ideas I would not have thought of.

    Stocking up on some (on sale) evaporated milk is doable and then I won't feel so bad throwing it away. I guess I don't bake enough. Perhaps any time I have some milk to use I could do a batch of waffles to freeze.

    I will check into powdered buttermilk and stable shelf milk.

    Next time I have left over "special" milk that I can't seem to use up, I will freeze it and see how it turns out.

  • chase_gw
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    The best by date on 18% is usually 4-6 weeks out.

    I buy a small container and use it, mixed with my low fat milk, when a recipe calls for whole milk or half and half.

    I can always find uses for it in baking, sauces and soups over such a long period.

  • debrak2008
    Original Author
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    What is 18%? I never heard of it.

  • ci_lantro
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    You can buy dry buttermilk powder to use for baking. (Have used this in the past with satisfactory results--Wal-Mart should have the Saco brand.) Or, during the winter when I'm doing more baking, I buy a quart of buttermilk and use it to make more buttermilk...1 part buttermilk to 3 parts milk (we use skim milk) shaken up in a jar and left on the counter overnight to culture. Refrigerate the next day. Much more convenient than having to run to the store and less expensive, too.

    I've not tried freezing b'milk but will in the future--thank you for the comments about it freezing well.

    Like others have mentioned, I keep several cans of evaporated milk in the pantry to use in cream soups, scalloped potatoes, etc., in place of cream/ half n' half.

    Also, I usually have one of those large containers of either plain or vanilla yogurt on hand to sub for buttermilk in cakes/ banana bread & in place of part of the mayonnaise in salad dressings. You need to cut back a bit on the sugar specified in a recipe if you're using the sweetened vanilla yogurt...but then I almost always cut the am't of sugar called for in a recipe anyway.

  • grainlady_ks
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    We've used whey-based and fat-free powdered milk products of one kind or another as our primary source for milk and other dairy products since 1981, using both instant and non-instant varieties. I purchase it in #10 cans (for long-term storage) or bulk amounts in buckets to save on the price of milk. I always purchase enough for a year at a time. These are the substitutions I've used over the decades of powdered milk use.

    --Evaporated milk: double strength powdered milk (twice as much milk powder)

    --Sweetened condensed milk:
    3/4 c. non-instant (OR 1-1/3 c. instant) powdered milk
    3/4 c. sugar
    1/2 c. hot tap water
    2 T. butter
    Melt margarine in hot water, placing hot water in blender. With blender going add sugar and powdered milk, blend until smooth. (Makes about 14-oz.) Can be stored up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.

    --Buttermilk:

    Method #1- which is actually sour milk
    1 c. water
    1/4 c. powdered milk
    1 T. vinegar or lemon juice

    Method #2-
    Mix 4 T. buttermilk powder to 1 cup liquid (reconstituted) powdered milk

    Method #3- (source: Natural Meals in Minutes - by Rita Bingham) This is a recipe that is like commercial buttermilk - rich, thick and tangy, and is an actual cultured product.

    1 quart lukewarm water
    1 c. dry milk powder
    1/2 c. commercial buttermilk OR reconstituted buttermilk powder
    (Note: you can also use 1 quart of commercial milk - any fat level you normally use - whole milk, 2%, etc.)

    Stir well and cover. Let stand in a warm place (at least 80-degrees F - I use my oven with the light on, and place the quart jar as far from the light as possible) until clabbered, about 12-18 hours. Stir until smooth. Refrigerate.

    NOTE: You can now use 1/2 c. of your homemade buttermilk to culture the next batch using powdered or regular milk. Use the homemade buttermilk for the next batch within 2-weeks.

    Method #4-
    I make homemade kefir using reconstituted powdered milk and real kefir grains and use kefir in recipes calling for buttermilk. I also drain the curd (a curd similar to yogurt) to use for plain yogurt, cream cheese and sour cream.

    --Half and half:
    For 1-cup - 7/8 c. double-strength reconstituted powdered milk (or regular milk) plus 1/2 T. butter or ghee

    --Cream:
    For 1-cup - 3/4 c. double- or triple-strength reconstituted powdered milk (or commercial milk) plus 1/3 c. butter or ghee (used for cooking or baking only, not for whipping)

    --Whipped "Cream" Topping:
    Method #1 Whip powdered milk. Mix 1 c. instant powdered milk with 1 c. ice water in a cold stainless steel bowl. Beat with chilled beaters until stiff. You can add sweetener of choice.

    Method #2 Chill a 13-oz. can of evaporated milk for 12 hours. Add 1 t. lemon juice. Whip until stiff.

    --Almond milk:
    Soak 1 c. almonds in water 8-10 hours (overnight), drain, rinse, drain. Blend with water in a high-speed blender. Drain the almond pulp through a nut milk bag (jelly bag or fine-screen strainer). You can dry the pulp to use in recipes calling for almond flour. I make concentrated almond milk by blending 1 c. of almonds in 2 c. of water, but you may like 3 to 3-1/2 c. of water. I can always thin it with more water if I need to. You can also sweeten your almond milk (dates, sweeteners), but I always use it straight.

    --Coconut milk: I buy powdered coconut milk (Wilderness Family Naturals) in 5-pound bags and use it for making coconut milk. You can also take unsweetened shredded coconut and water and make coconut milk in a blender. (http://wellnessmama.com/2447/homemade-coconut-milk/)

    --Whole milk:
    Method #1 - 1 c. reconstituted non-fat dry milk PLUS 2 t. butter or ghee

    Method #2 - 1/2 c. evaporated milk and 1/2 c. water

    --Instant and NON-instant powdered milk measures differently. Instant has a larger particle than NON-instant. If you have instant powdered milk and need NON-instant, blend the dry instant powdered milk in a blender or food processor to make fine particles. Now you can use instant dry milk powder measure-for-measure for NON-instant powdered milk.

    -Grainlady

  • chase_gw
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I'm suure you must have it in the States too. Although I recall your naming convention/labeling can be different

    Here we label with % fat. This is what I think the comparison is but others may know better.

    skim - zero fat
    1% - low fat
    2%- not sure what you call it ...this is the one we prefer
    10% - half and half
    18% - table cream or light cream
    35 % - whipping cream
    over 35% - Heavy cream

  • ann_t
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I buy 18% cream for my coffee. I also cook with it. It is also called "Coffee Cream".

    I'm trying to remember what it was called in the US. Maybe "Table Cream".

    ~Ann

  • debrak2008
    Original Author
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    Light cream thats it! Thanks.

    Well this is another thread I need to bookmark.

    Grainlady, You don't have to answer this.....but how do you know all this stuff? It just amazes me.

  • grainlady_ks
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    debrak2008-

    I'm an information freak with an insatiable need to know (I was that little kid who always asked "why" and wanted to know how things worked). Lots of reading, studying, lots of classes taken and given, and research (come see my piles of files).

    I'm certified to teach food and nutrition classes. I've been a foods judge at County Fairs for decades, so I've needed a lot of standard food science information for judging standards.

    -Grainlady

  • foodonastump
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    The attached link discusses names based on milkfat percentages, and the terminology differences between US, CA, and UK.

    Sharon - 2% is reduced fat, 1% is low fat.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Translations

  • Olychick
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    I never buy buttermilk and don't keep the dried around (I don't use it fast enough to make it worth buying), but I do always have organic non-fat Greek yogurt in the refer. I just thin it with soy milk or any other milk I have and use it in place of buttermilk. Works perfectly.

  • debrak2008
    Original Author
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    Just went to the supermarket. Its a high volume store.

    The 18% or light cream best buy is Oct. 23 (3 weeks)
    Half and Half was Oct. 12th (2 weeks).

    I did buy some sour cream for a banana bread recipe and that best buy was Nov. 11th (6 weeks)

  • Cloud Swift
    10 years ago
    last modified: 8 years ago

    For milk, what I do depends on the other ingredients in the recipe. For a recipe that has other milk fat ingredients (e.g. butter, cream), I usually just use the skim milk - figuring that 4% fat for whole milk isn't going to make much change in the result.

    If the milk is providing the main source of fat in the recipe, then we usually have whipping cream around and I'll mix some of that in with the non-fat milk to make something close to whole milk.

    For buttermilk, we always have yogurt on hand so usually I just use that thinned with enough milk to make that more liquid.

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