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triciae_gw

Regional Sandwiches

triciae
12 years ago

I'm putting together a list of regional sandwiches for a future party idea.

Please take a look at my list & correct errors & also add your own regional sandwich. It's funny. I lived in Denver for a decade & can't think of a sandwich originating in Denver or even Colorado. There's got to be something?

I also don't know much about the mid-west or southern states do please chime in with your city/state sandwich!

Thanks,

/tricia

REGIONAL SANDWICHES

New England - Lobster Roll (Maine is known for lobster rolls & Connecticut is known for clam rolls). Must be served on a top-split, soft, white hot dog bun. The Library of Congress attributes the first hamburger sold in America to Louis' Lunch in New Haven, CT although there is lots of controversy around the hamburger. Louis' is still serving their burgers though on the same 1898 vertical gas cast iron stove.

Philadelphia - Philly Steak & Cheese

Maryland - Blue Crab

Florida - Cubano

Louisiana - Muffaletta but also Shrimp or Oyster Po' Boy

Kentucky - Kentucky Brown

New Jersey - Taylor Ham

Los Angeles - French Dip

Indiana - Breaded Pork Tenderloin

New York - Pastrami or Corned Beef on Rye (deli)

Michigan - Pastie

North Carolina - BBQ Pulled Pork (vinegar-based sauce)

Texas - BBQ Brisket (ketchup-based sauce w/dry rub)

Buffalo - Beef of Weck

New Mexico - Green Chili Cheeseburger

San Diego - Fish Taco

San Francisco - Saigon Sandwich but anything on sourdough is also associated with San Francisco.

Chicago - Italian Beef

North Dakota, South Dakota, & Nebraska - Bierock

Comments (150)

  • jimster
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Wow!! From 0 to 100 posts in less than 2 days and all of it interesting. What a thread!

    Jim

  • sffog
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    fried spam or fried spam and egg on Love's white bread's
    Arizona: Sonoran hot dog
    San Francisco: Bahn Mihn, (Vietnamese sandwich) from Saigon Sandwich shop on Larkin Street
    of course let us not forget Rainbow Egg Salad Sandwiches made by MOM with all those colored Easter Eggs

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  • kframe19
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    No one has mentioned the fried brain sandwiches that are found in Indiana and thereabouts?

    Thank God.

  • adriennecooks
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Hi, Mostly all the regional sandwiches have been named, so I'm out on a limb to add the A Dagwood Sandwich, you know the one in the Comic Strips. Using up any and all of your leftovers from the fridge. Hey, it is a sandwich right?

  • skeip
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    OK tricae, your thread, give us the definitive list!!

    Steve

  • triciae
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Yeah, right skeip. I've still got about half of the thread to work thru! I've started Googling some of the sandwiches unknown to me & giving a brief description. This is going to be more than a couple days exercise I'm 'a thinking! :) Anyway, here's what I've got so far...

    REGIONAL SANDWICHES

    New England - Lobster Roll (Maine is known for lobster rolls & Connecticut is known for crab rolls). Must be served on a top-split, soft, white hot dog bun. The first hamburger in America was also served in Connecticut. Flo's in Cape Neddick, Maine serves an iconic hot dog.

    In Connecticut, both the lobsta roll & the crab roll are served. Reviews pretty consistently say that Abbott's In The Rough (Noank, CT); The Cove (Mystic, CT); Sea Swirl, Mystic, CT); Captain Scott's (New London, CT); Johnny Ads (Old Saybrook, CT); & Bill's Seafood (Westbrook, CT) serve the best in CT.

    The iconic Connecticut crab sandwich isn't a salad-type mixture that most people think of as either a crab or lobsta sandwich. Here, it's served hot. There is no mayo, celery, or anything else...just crab. The crab is served hot mixed with a generous amount of melted butter.

    In Mystic, the standard is 1/2 lb. of crab per sandwich & must include multiple pieces of whole claw meat. It's served on a grilled top-split, soft white, New England-style hot dog bun. The sides are cold slaw & fries. In Connecticut, if you order "crab sandwich" that's what you'll get. If you want a "crab salad" type sandwich...you have to make a specific request & the waiter/waitress will say, "Welcome to CT. Where are you from?"

    Same with the lobsta roll here...1/2 lbs. of lobsta meat dripping in melted butter served on a grilled NE hot dog roll. You have to specifically request a cold salad-type sandwich.


    Philadelphia - Philly Steak & Cheese

    Maryland - Fried Soft-Shell Blue Crab

    Florida - Cubano

    Louisiana - Muffaletta but also Shrimp or Oyster Po' Boy as well as Roast Beef Po'Boy.

    Kentucky - Hot Brown; there's also a sandwich called an Olive Nut that very popular in Kentucky.

    New Jersey - Taylor Ham

    Los Angeles - French Dip

    Indiana - Breaded Pork Tenderloin

    New York - Pastrami or Corned Beef on Rye (deli)

    Michigan - Pastie & Chicken Salad with Dried Cherries

    South Carolina - Pimento Cheese sandwich & Pork BBQ (mustard-based sauce)

    North Carolina - BBQ Pulled Pork (vinegar-based sauce)

    Texas - BBQ Brisket (ketchup-based sauce w/dry rub)

    Buffalo - Beef on Weck (A beef on weck sandwich is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll (similar to a Kaiser roll but with Kosher salt & caraway seeds on top) and is a tradition in Western New York. The meat is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and fries. It is believed that a German baker named William Wahr, who is thought to have emigrated from the Black Forest region of Germany, created the kummelweck roll while living in Buffalo, New York.

    New Mexico - Green Chili Cheeseburger

    San Diego - Fish Taco

    San Francisco - Saigon Sandwich but anything on sourdough is also associated with San Francisco.

    Chicago - Italian Beef

    North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, & Nebraska - Bierock (also Runza)

    Minnesota - Fried Spam Sandwich (Spam is made in Austin,
    Minnesota) is the most iconic but the Fried Walleye Sandwich (on an elongated bun with tartar or remoulade sauce) is also a local favorite.

    Iowa - Maid-rite Sandwich (A special cut and grind of meat with a selected set of spices which is not a traditional hamburger. Rather, it is called a "loose meat" sandwich. While the component meat is similar, the Maid-Rite sandwich's meat is not formed into a patty, making it similar to a sloppy Joe only without the tomato-based sauce.)

    Ontario - Peameal bacon on a bun

    Quebec - Montreal smoked meat on rye

    Rochester, NY - White Hot (Rochester's hot dogs are often called "white hote" or "pop opens".)

    Saratoga, NY - Club Sandwich (originated in Saratoga). Potato chips were also invented in Saratoga.

    Vermont - Sharp Vermont Cheddar on whole grain bread

    California Central Valley - Tri Tip Sandwich (Thinly sliced BBQ Tri-tip with tomato-based BBQ sauce piled thickly in a soft French roll.)

    Georgia - Homegrown Tomato Sandwich & also a Bacon, Lettuce, & Tomato.

    Binghamton, New York - The Spiedie (pronounced "speedy") is a dish local to greater Binhamton in the Southern tier of New York State, and somewhat more broadly known and enjoyed throughout Central New York State. Spiedie consists of cubes of chicken or pork, but it may also be made from lamb, veal, venison or beef. The meat cubes are marinated overnight or longer (sometimes for as long as two weeks) in a special marinade, then grilled carefully on spits (if steel skewers are used, they are called "spiedie rods") over a charcoal pit. The freshly prepared cubes are served on soft Italian bread or a submarine roll, skewer and all, and sometimes drizzled with fresh marinade. The bread is used as an oven glove to grip the meat while the skewer is removed. Spiedie meat cubes can also be eaten straight off the skewer or can be served in salads, stir fries, and a number of other dishes. The marinade recipe varies, usually involving olive oil, vinegar, and a variety of Italian spices and fresh mint.

    Oregon - Salmon Sandwich & the Crab Melt along the coast.

    Hawaii - Spam Sandwich (ugh, more Spam!)

  • mustangs81
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Don't forget Spiedies:

    If you find folks who know of spiedies, they are most likely originally from Binghamton in Broome County, New York, or they know someone who is. Broome County is in New York's Southern Tier, southeast of the Finger Lakes and just north of Pennsylvania. People who live in the area eat them at restaurants, from street vendors, buy from supermarkets, and even make their own at backyard cookouts. Spiedies have been completely integrated into the food culture of the region, and natives who have moved away from the area have been known to have commercial spiedie sauce shipped, by the case, to their new homes.

  • cooperbailey
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Ok I have to jump in here- Crabcake sandwiches are also tratitional here in MD. Broiled or fried, it must have Old Bay seasoning in it, and only blue crab will do.
    And cooked crabmeat is easier to find in a market than fresh softcrabs( meaning alive)

  • compumom
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Great thread!! But wasn't Philipe's the originator of the French Dip sandwich?

  • triciae
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    mustangs, already got the spiedie on the list (see above). It's towards the bottom under Binghamton, NY.

    compumom, yep, I've always thought Philipe's invented the French Dip. That's why I gave it Los Angeles iconic status.

    cooperbailey, I'm not really looking for "traditional" as much as "iconic". So, is it a fried soft shelled blue crab or crab cake sandwich? DH lived in Baltimore for 8 years & says it's the fried soft shell crab. Please post a vote for the "iconic" Maryland sandwich??? When you think of Maryland...which one do people associate most with Maryland? Thanks.

    /tricia

  • jimster
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I think of fried soft shell crab sandwich. I've had it in Maryland and have never seen it offered anywhere else. It's unusual to find soft shell crabs in any form outside the Chesapeake Bay region.

    Jim

  • BeverlyAL
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I think it's difficult to say where most (not all) sandwiches originated. I do know that the Barbecued chicken (again the type with the vinegar and cayenne only)sandwich with white barbecue sauce originated right here in North Alabama.

  • beanthere_dunthat
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Iconic in Maryland? Yeah, soft-shelled crab immediatley comes to my mind.

    Surprised to see the tomato-based BBQ sauce for the Central Valley tri-tip. Maybe the area I lived in was a deviant pocket. The meat was marinated, grilled, and served plain or at most with a bit of mustrard or horseradish sauce.

  • Bumblebeez SC Zone 7
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    It's not about where it originated as much as where it is now associated. I would associate sausage biscuits with Tennessee only because everything else is taken, and the subliminal "Tennessee Pride" brand sausage is on my mind.

    Most southern foods -that's about all I know- are all over the Deep South.

  • mustangs81
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Sorry Tricia, knowing how thorough you are I should have looked closer.

  • weed30 St. Louis
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I had to jump in for a drive-by posting from St. Louis, MO.

    said to be available only in Chinese restaurants in St. Louis: Egg foo yung patty (made with eggs, minced white onion and bean sprouts), white bread, plenty of mayonnaise, lettuce, tomatoes and pickle.

    Fried calves brain slabs on white or rye, served with red onions, hot mustard and pickles.

    Shaved ham and turkey served open faced on toast, covered with cheese sauce and two slices of bacon crossed over the top.

    Italian bread with ham, roast beef, Genoa salami, brick cheese, dill pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion, pepperoncini & "Amaghetti's Special Dressing". (a tangy-sweet Italian salad dressing)

    Aside from the Amaghetti Special, the history of the sandwiches are more compelling than the sandwich itself. (For me, anyway. Google them for their stories.) What sets the Amaghetti Special apart, aside from being the sandwich on the list that is least likely to kill you, is the freshly baked bread. Absolutely devine.

  • judi_ia
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I am surprised no one mentioned the Tenderloin sandwich with catsup, mustard, pickles and onions...yummmm! My favorite!

    Iowa has so many places to buy one, but not sure it originated here! Hard to find outside of Iowa.

  • hawk307
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Triciae:

    In Philadelphia , it's a Philly CheeseSteak ,
    not a Philly Steak with Cheese.

    There's a difference , doncha no, LOL !!!

    When I was younger the CheeseSteak was made with thin
    slices of Steak.
    Not chopped like Hamburger as it is now.
    I don't know why and when this started ???

    Maybe it is because the meat is fluffed up and less is needed.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Please, don't leave out the Hoagie , in the Philly area.
    It started with the workers on Hog Island.

    Now it is called ( a Sub ) and many other names.

    Thanks, Lou

  • sally123
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Do people actually eat fried calves' brains or is that a joke?

  • caliloo
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    This might be of interest to you too. It certainly isn;t as complete a list but there are a few additions!

  • triciae
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Lou, I've corrected the Philly Steak's name. Thanks.

    I've added the Hoagie but with a qualifier. I don't think it's really iconic to Philly even though it started there & was declared the official sandwich in 1992. The Hoagie has been so generalized throughout the US that I just don't feel it's "iconic" anymore of any one region. I'm looking for sandwiches like the Hot Brown that immediately screams Kentucky & isn't nationalized.

    /tricia

  • triciae
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Sharon, I was just going thru the thread looking for sandwiches I missed & found your post! Somehow, I missed it even with the pixs! Now we've got the bocadillo & that other disgusting thing on our sammie list! Thanks.

    /tricia

  • jimster
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Lou,

    That's a beautiful looking hoagie, not like the pathetic ones served up by the big sandwich chains. I can't stand the ones made by Subway.

    Jim

  • BeverlyAL
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    The Philly Cheesesteak finally reached here a few years ago, however it is murdered in some of the cafe's. Even though it may not be very good in many places here, I've never seen it with ground meat. A good Philly Cheesesteak is one of my favorite sandwiches.

  • dcarch7 d c f l a s h 7 @ y a h o o . c o m
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    There was a one-hour program on PBS channel on Philly Cheesesteak sandwiches nationwide.

    Very interesting program.

    dcarch

  • triciae
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    OK, I've updated the "List"...how am I doing?

    REGIONAL SANDWICHES

    New England - Lobster Roll (Maine is known for lobster rolls & Connecticut is known for clam rolls). Must be served on a top-split, soft, white hot dog bun. The first hamburger in America was also served in Connecticut. Connecticut is unique in that lobster & crab rolls are served hot with just seafood & melted butter (no mayo or celery). Flo's in Cape Neddick, Maine, serving hot dogs, is also a local iconic sandwich.

    Philadelphia - Philly Cheese Steak & the Hoagie (The Hoagie was declared the "Official Sandwich of Philadelphia" in 1992. Originally created in Philadelphia there are a number of different versions as to how the Hoagie got its name; but all agree on the sandwich's origins. It is now a generalized sandwich available all over the U.S.)

    Maryland - Fried Soft-Shell Blue Crab

    Florida - Cubano & Grouper Sandwiches

    Louisiana - Muffaletta but also Shrimp or Oyster Po' Boy as well as Roast Beef Po'Boy.

    Kentucky - Hot Brown (created at the Brown Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky); there's also a sandwich called an Olive Nut that very popular in Kentucky.

    New Jersey - Taylor Ham (aka Pork Roll). The product, as it is made today, was developed in 1856 by John Taylor of Trenton, New Jersey, though several firms produce their own versions.

    Los Angeles - French Dip (created at Philippe's in Los Angeles)

    Indiana - Breaded Pork Tenderloin

    New York City - Pastrami or Corned Beef on Rye (deli). The sandwich must be over-filled to the point of being female unfriendly to eat.

    Michigan - Pastie is the iconic sandwich but Chicken Salad with Dried Cherries is another local favorite. Michigan has a large Middle Eastern population and the falafel in a pita is widely available.

    South Carolina - Pimento Cheese sandwich & Pork BBQ (mustard-based sauce)

    North Carolina - BBQ Pulled Pork (vinegar-based sauce)

    Texas - BBQ Brisket (ketchup-based sauce w/dry rub)

    Buffalo - Beef on Weck (A beef on weck sandwich is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll (similar to a Kaiser roll but with Kosher salt & caraway seeds on top) and is a tradition in Western New York. The meat is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and fries. It is believed that a German baker named William Wahr, who is thought to have emigrated from the Black Forest region of Germany, created the kummelweck roll while living in Buffalo, New York.

    New Mexico - Green Chili Cheeseburger

    San Diego - Fish Taco

    San Francisco - Saigon Sandwich but anything on sourdough is also associated with San Francisco.

    Chicago - Italian Beef & the Chicago Hot Dog (A steamed, boiled or grilled all-beef hot dog [I would say a Vienna] on a poppy seed bun... topped with mustard, onion, sweet pickle relish (often a dyed neon green variety called "Nuclear Relish"), a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers, and celery salt. Some variants exist, adding things such as cucumber slices, although ketchup is never included. The complete assembly of a Chicago hotdog is said to be 'dragged through the garden' because of the unique combination of condiments.)

    North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, & Nebraska - Bierock (aka Runza)

    Minnesota - Fried Spam Sandwich (Spam is made in Austin, Minnesota) is the most iconic but the Fried Walleye Sandwich (on an elongated bun with tartar or remoulade sauce) is also a local favorite.

    Iowa - Maid-rite Sandwich (A special cut and grind of meat with a selected set of spices which is not a traditional hamburger. Rather, it is called a "loose meat" sandwich. While the component meat is similar, the Maid-Rite sandwich's meat is not formed into a patty, making it similar to a sloppy Joe only without the tomato-based sauce.)

    Ontario - Peameal bacon on a bun

    Quebec - Montreal smoked meat on rye

    Rochester, NY - White Hot (Rochester's hot dogs are often called "white hote" or "pop opens".) When you order a hot dog in Rochester you have to specify red hot or white hot. Otherwise they won't know which to give you. White hots get ordered a little more often than red hots. White hots are made with a white wiener which would compare to bockwurst except that bockwurst can also be red. White hots are iconic.

    Saratoga, NY - Club Sandwich (originated in Saratoga). Potato chips were also invented in Saratoga.

    Vermont - Sharp Vermont Cheddar on whole grain bread

    California Central Valley - Tri Tip Sandwich (Thinly sliced BBQ Tri-tip with tomato-based BBQ sauce piled thickly in a soft French roll.) I don't know if this sandwich is really iconic or just popular?

    Georgia - Homegrown Tomato Sandwich & also a Bacon, Lettuce, & Tomato.

    Binghamton, New York - The Spiedie (pronounced "speedy") is a dish local to greater Binhamton in the Southern tier of New York State, and somewhat more broadly known and enjoyed throughout Central New York State. Spiedie consists of cubes of chicken or pork, but it may also be made from lamb, veal, venison or beef. The meat cubes are marinated overnight or longer (sometimes for as long as two weeks under a controlled environment) in a special marinade, then grilled carefully on spits (if steel skewers are used, they are called "spiedie rods") over a charcoal pit. The freshly prepared cubes are served on soft Italian bread or a submarine roll, skewer and all, and sometimes drizzled with fresh marinade. The bread is used as an oven glove to grip the meat while the skewer is removed. Spiedie meat cubes can also be eaten straight off the skewer or can be served in salads, stir fries, and a number of other dishes. The marinade recipe varies, usually involving olive oil, vinegar, and a variety of Italian spices and fresh mint.

    Oregon - Salmon Sandwich & the Crab Melt along the coast.

    Hawaii - Spam Sandwich (ugh, more Spam!)

    Spain - Spain - the bocadillo, a crusty small baguette sandwich. Filling can be slices of cheese or Serrano ham, or potato omelets. A favorite is a 'pepito' which has a thin steak wedged into the crusty roll, toasted in a sandwich maker so it's flattened and toasty top and bottom.

    England - England - Chip Butty - fries inside slices of supermarket white bread with ketchup. (Comes from the north of England somewhere where it may also be served in pubs.)

    Tennessee - The Elvis Sandwich (peanut butter, banana, honey, & bacon12 sliceson store bought white bread). While not limited to Tennessee & stretching the definition of "sandwich", sausage gravy on a southern biscuit is very representative of Tennessee.

    Mississippi - Fried Catfish Sandwich (Mississippi is the catfish capital of the world).

    Oklahoma - Chicken Fried Steak Sandwich is probably the iconic but fried bologna is a runner-up.

    Ohio - Shredded Chicken, warm, held in chicken broth and then piled on bread. Very bland. (if not iconic - at least representative)

    Cleveland - Cleveland Polish Boy - Kibalsi with fries, coleslaw, and BBQ sauce.

    Massachusetts - Fluffernutter Sandwich

    Wisconsin - The Brat with or without kraut.

    Virginia - Country Ham Biscuit

    Memphis - BBQ pork with a tomato-based sauce

    /tricia

  • jojoco
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Not sure how iconic this one is, but when I lived in Dublin, Ireland with a family during college, we often asked for salad with dinner. Leftover salad, with dressing, was put on buttered bread for a salad sandwich. I'm pretty sure it was iconic only to the family I lived with. So I am calling it the Saville Sandwich.

  • tmd15
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Pittsburgh - The sandwich mentioned with the fries and slaw originated from Primanti Brother's in the Strip District. It was originally made for truckers who could basically have a meal in a sandwich for eating on the road. The fillings were anything from ham and egg, cappicolla and egg, roast beef, steak, pastrami or just about any deli meat combination. the meats were grilled and topped with your choice of cheese, slapped onto a thick slice of Italian bread and topped with lettuce, tomato and originally a HANDFULL of cole slaw and fries and the second slice of bread. The original Primanti Brother's restaurant is entertainment in itself. They are opened until 3:00 am and it is popular with the after hours bar scene. It is the perfect sandwich to soak up all that alcohol you just consumed. Between the the cooks behind the counter making the sandwiches and the serving style and the patrons waiting for the food, you are always entertained. They will serve the fries on the side at your request, but you might lose a little respect from the cooks, lol. They have opened several chains from the original, I think there is even one in Florida, but the sandwiches just don't taste the same as the original. I think they use a different bread and they are just not as greasy (I know it's bad, but tastes oh so good) and sloppy as I remember them. Another Pittsburgh iconic sandwich is Isaly's Chipped Ham. Basically a pressed ham loaf that was finely chipped and mounded between two slices of white bread with whatever condiments or sandwhich fixings you like. The ham sandwiches always tasted best when made as soon as you got it home and lost something once the meat was refrigerated. I think that is where the variation of Isaly's BBQ Chipped Ham sandwich came from: melt a bit of butter in a frying pan add your chipped ham and mix in your favorite BBQ sauce (some people also add sweet pickle relish)and serve on a hamburger bun. I haven't had either one in years, but this thread has got me wanting them both. Thanks for jogging my memory on this.

  • jazmynsmom
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    At the risk of sounding contrarian, I lived the first 18 years of my life in North Dakota and never saw a Bierock or Runza there. It is, however, impossible to go to any kind of outdoor festival type event in North Dakota without seeing multiple vendors selling fresh, hot Fleischkuekle.

    I live in Wisconsin now, and LindaC, I know other states have bratwurst, but trust me on this one: No one is as dedicated to their brats as the cheeseheads.

  • triciae
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    jazmynsmon, I've Googled "Bierocks, North Dakota" & there are a multitude of articles noting North Dakota as being Bierock territory. Is it possible you know them under a different name? Runa, for example. I've never lived in North Dakota but I am German-Russian & have belonged to the American Historical Society of Germans From Russia for decades. The AHSGR is located in Nebraska & they tell me beirocks are considered an iconic "food pathway" of North Dakota's eastern European earliest settlers. The German-Russians were encouraged to move from Russia to North/South Dakota by the railroads in the 1880s. The German-Russians sent scouts & returned home telling villagers that North/South Dakota was similar to the Russian steppe & would be a good place to relocate their village. Entire villages from Russia uprooted themselves & resettled in the Dakotas bringing their beirocks with them.

    Here's an article you might be interested in...

    /tricia

  • jazmynsmom
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Tricae, five of my eight great-grandparents were German-Russian immigrants. Your link summarizes most of my family history. I won't pretend that my knowledge is comprehensive, but I never once encountered a beirock, runza or runa while living there.

  • Ideefixe
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Nevada's got a lot of Basques--how about a piperada sandwich?

  • jimster
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    "(Rochester's hot dogs are often called "white hote" or "pop opens".)"
    The phrasing here is a bit confusing. Not all of Roschester's hot dogs are called white hots. Some are called red hots. I have never heard the term "pop opens" but it probably refers to the very popular natural casing ones made by Zweigle's. Zweigle's makes both red hots and white hots. Having said all that, the simple answer would be to delete the whole sentence.

    "white hote"
    Is that a typo? I don't know what hote is. Hots?

    "White hots get ordered a little more often than red hots."
    That is a personal impression of mine which might not hold up to scrutiny. I suggest omitting it.

    Jim

  • bunnyman
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Did anyone claim the Egg Sandwich?

    I recall a "Slaw Dog" as being popular with the MacDill AFB crew.

    From the suburbs of Bently in Mid-Michigan we have the BBQ Bacon sandwich. Hot strips of bacon on buttered toast with BBQ sauce drizzled on while the bacon is still sizzling.... mmmm one of my favorites when I'm thinking "what diet?".

    Don't miss Silverwood's Polish Dog... polish sausage on a hot dog bun with mustard and onions.

    In grade school they used to serve us fried bologna sandwiches. If you have to eat bologna that is the only way to have it.

    At work we have been on a BLC roll. That would be Bacon, Lettuce, and Cheese.... on a toasted sub roll. We get a massive delivery order every Thursday so the restaurant knows what we want and how to make it. They have crumbled crispy bacon for a pizza topping and just put a handful on a bun and glue it down with broiled cheese.... needs lots of lettuce. Again... "what diet".

    I used to like sitting in the Crossroads Cafe at MSU and watch the foreign students take their first crack at a hamburger. Seems the most "American" of sandwiches is a hamburger piled sky high with all the toppings... and cheese. The thing that seemed to puzzle them most was how to get a bite of a burger that is 5 inches high. Who me?... sit back and just watch people? The visiting students seemed to be having so much fun with it I often wished everyone visiting the USA for the first time could be handed a burger when they get off the plane... welcome!

    Ack!... how do you spell Rubean.. ruban.. ruben

    : )
    lyra

  • triciae
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Jim, yes...typos. Since my stroke there's a lot of typos. Sorry. I'll fix it. I'll take out the personal impression stuff & just leave the nuts/bolts.

    ideefixe, I lived in Ely, Nevada for a few years in the late 50s & early 60s. Lots of Basque people herding sheep. Once a year, they would camp above town with their wagons & invite the entire town to a huge BBQ of pit cooked lamb. Delicious food. Something representative of the Basque culture does seem reasonable, to me, for Nevada especially since we're lacking any other iconic foods. I've added it to the list for Nevada.

    jazmynsmom, well, first of all..."Hello, I'm always pleased to meet another German-Russian. Mary1000 is one of us also. My Russian village is Norka." I don't know what to say about the bierock thing other than I'm going to leave it as a Dakota's sandwich. If you haven't had one...make some up...they're delicious! My freezer is always full of bierocks. DH feels there's nothing to eat if we run out. :)

    I also want to thank everybody for the great participation with my sandwich list. I'm going to put a copy in our car's glove box so when we're on the road we can seek out some of these regional specialties.

    My intent is to keep working on this list & eventually give a description of each sandwich so somebody could try making them. That's going to be a lot of work so guess I've got a new summer project!

    We're still missing some states...Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Alaska (don't we have somebody on the forum from Alaska?). What a fun project!

    /tricia

  • beanthere_dunthat
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Lyra - What's a slaw dog? Hot dog with slaw? That's very popular in NC. DH used to look at me like I had two heads when I insisted I had to have cole slaw on my hotdog.

    Wyoming - My BIL was born three. He says a Kronski on a bun. Kronski is the manufacturer in Rock Springs, but the sausages and sandwiches - a really garlicky kielbasa-type sausage - are referred to AS Kronskis

  • hawk307
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    tricia:
    What does Iconic have to do with the Hoagie ?
    It started in Philly.

    I don't think you can convince a Phillian otherwise.

    I've given you the true facts from History that ( I lived )
    All the other sources lie , lol!!!
    I always tell the truth. That's the truth.

    You can say the same thing about the Philly CheeseSteak.

    Cheese Steaks are made throughout the Country.
    So is Pizza !!! When I make a Sicilian Pizza, I don't think of Chicago or NY.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Jim: Thanks !!! I don't care for Subway either.
    The Bread is like a large Hamburger Roll.
    But many like Subway.

    The Photo is too light.
    Have to get the PC working right, one day .
    The Hoagie looks better on the old computer.
    - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Lou

    PS : Vinegar and Pickles weren't used in a Hoagie, way back when.

  • gldno1
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I think Breaded Pork Tenderloin would have to be king here.

  • triciae
    Original Author
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Lou, if somebody in Phoenix is asked what sandwich do you think goes with "Philly"...what do you think they would say?

    That's right. They would say, "Philly Cheese Steak" (did I get that right?) not "Philly Hoagie". lol

    I'm not removing the disclaimer. :)

    gldno1, "I think Breaded Pork Tenderloin would have to be king here." Thanks, but where is "here"? :)

    BTDT, Wow, thanks for Wyoming. I've never heard of Kronski even after living in Denver for a decade.

    /tricia

  • Ideefixe
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Utah--home of the ribbon sandwich.

  • twoyur
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Thanks for answering a 40 year old mystery for me

    i grew up in an area that had a very large transient work force. I been moved was what i heard the company's initials stood for. For a year or so a family lived near us that came from the south not sure where but think i know know. Their favorite lunch time sandwich was olive nut. Now why any one would torture perfectly good cream cheese like that is beyond me. I do remember someone's Mom saying that olive nut spread proved that you could not put any old C&ap on bread and 12 year old boys would eat it

  • hawk307
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Tricia:
    I asked someone in Phoenix:
    " what sandwich, do you know of, relates to Phila" .
    They said " the Philly Hoagie "

    I wouldn't lie, lol!!!
    LOU

  • beanthere_dunthat
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Twoyur, Not just 12 year old boys, but little old ladies, too. I swear they were on nearly every menu in the area (except the chains). It was a taaste I could never acquire. And I've never seen them in any other region. If your neighbors weren't from Kentucky, I bet they had spent a lot of time there.

    (Tricia - Cheesesteak)

  • hawk307
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Tricia:
    When I helped; in a friends Pizzera, making Short Order sandwiches, I made loads of Pepperoni and Egg.
    Also Peppers and Egg sandwiches.
    Don't know the origin but they were very popular.
    Maybe someone else can elaborate.
    Lou

  • gellchom
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Tricia, don't forget the slider (White Castle hamburger) for Columbus. BTW, I've never even heard of the chicken sandwich you have down for Ohio, and I've lived here for almost 28 years.

    I see Spain made your list. So are we on to other countries?

    Cuba - medianoche
    Israel - felafel in pita
    Vietnam - Bahn Mien

  • Islay_Corbel
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Well. Imagine my shame - the chip butty being British LOL. Happily, it's a northern thing and I'm southern or it's strictly for tourists. In Scotland, they deep fry Mars bars dipped in batter but I digress!

    In France, oddly enough, one of the most popular baguettes is called an "Americain" - very good. 1/3 of a baguette, mayo, ham, tomato, hard boiled egg, cucumber, all rolled up in aluminium foil. You peel it like a banana and nibble your way down or you end up wearing more than you eat!

  • caliloo
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Okay - my kids now want "Chip Buttys" to take for their lunch at school tomorrow! LOL!

    And you are absolutely correct:
    "That's right. They would say, "Philly Cheese Steak" (did I get that right?) not "Philly Hoagie". lol"

    Alexa

  • lindac
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I have to take issue with your description of a Maid-Rite...it's not seasoned at all but with salt and pepper, nor is it a special type of meat. My good friends who own the local Maid-Rite use the whole steer and has it ground, then the meat is steamed.
    But I can't let you omit the tenderloin sandwich. I know of nowhere else that serves such a thing. It's a slice of boneless pork loin, pounded thin, breaded and seasoned, which varies by the maker...some use a bit of sage, some just salt and pepper some a seasoned salt like Lowries....then deep fried and served on a large hamburger bun....but the meat must overhang the bun by at least 2 inches on all sides....3 inches is better, and served with some chopped onion, a slice of pickle and mustard...ketsup on the side.
    And I think the issue with the Philadelphia Haogie is that in Philly they call what the rest of the country calls a "submarine" or a "sub" a hoagie.
    Linda C

  • dgkritch
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Triciae.............I think Idaho just provides ALL the fries! LOL

    I'm not much help, but Salmon was the first thing that came to mind for Oregon, then crab melt......
    Must. Be. Dungeness!

    Deanna

  • moosemac
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I'll add one more to the list:

    Pilgrim Sandwich - New England
    White bread, turkey, mayo, stuffing, lettuce and cranberry sauce.

    You see these at agricultural fairs like the Deerfield, NH Fair and the Brimfield, MA Antique Show.