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solstice98

What are you reading? (Garden books & others)

solstice98
16 years ago

Ambersky started this thread on the Discussions page but it's too good to lose! Jump to the end and share what you are reading. Garden books are, of course, of special interest, but I read a lot and always want to know about new, good books.

What are your favorite garden books?

And what are you reading now?

___________________________

From the original thread:

Pleasure Reads for Gardners

Posted by ambersky 9b FL (My Page) on

Tue, May 23, 06 at 9:43

I enjoy books about gardens, that are just for pleasure. You know, not the ones that tell you how to plant and fertalize, but simply entertain.

So far, my favorites have been "The Botony of Desire," and one called something like "A Walk in My Garden, by a gentleman who designed gardens. He had given up his home and traveled from place to place, living for a few months, designing a garden, then moving on. I loaned that one out and never got it back, and now I can't find it.

Anyway, right now I'm reading Jamaica Kincaid's "My Garden (Book):," and it's really very good. Of course, anything by Kincaid is wonderful, but this one is especially perfect.

So, does anyone else have a recomendation in this small but lovely lit catagory?

Follow-Up Postings:

__________________________________

* Posted by cindeea 10 Ft Myers (My Page) on

Tue, May 23, 06 at 19:56

Amber, I have to check out some of these books. They sound like a wonderful past time and escape. I often eat at my desk over lunch hour and do crossword puzzles. Reading Gardenesque novels sounds fun!

____________________________________

* Posted by ambersky 9b FL (My Page) on

Tue, May 23, 06 at 20:17

Oh they are very satisfying, though I have to confess that instead of reading, "My Garden" had me out clipping and weeding and planting...garden books are dangerous that way.

"The Botany of Desire," really can change the way you see plants, or it did me. He points out that plants stimulate and satisfy desires in other creatures, in order to spread themselves. Squirels desires for lunch, wasps desire for a mate, bees desire for pollen, human's desire for sweet.... He goes into detail on four plants that use 4 different human desires...Apple and our desire for sweetness, Tulip and our desire for beauty, Marajuana and our desire for intoxication, and potato and our desire for security. he shows how the evolution of those 4 plants is tied up in it's interaction with humans. It's very cool.

Kincaid's "My Garden" is much more intimate...a woman who happens to be both a fabulous writer and an addicted gardener tells about her garden obsesion. I am laughing with recognition all though it.

_______________________________

* Posted by lobelia 10a (My Page) on

Tue, May 23, 06 at 20:22

Sounds interesting! I never thought of finding a good book on those subjects & didn't know there was such a thing!

____________________________

* Posted by msmarion 9bFLPalm City (My Page) on

Tue, May 23, 06 at 21:27

Thanks Amber. I'm going to the library right after work tomorrow and see if I can find them.

___________________________

* Posted by solstice98 9b Orlando (My Page) on

Tue, May 23, 06 at 21:48

Thanks Amber. I read constantly and even listen to taped books in the car as I commute everyday (audible(dot)com is wonderful!), but I have not explored garden lit. Can't imagine how that escaped me!

______________________________

* Posted by maggie 10 (My Page) on

Tue, May 23, 06 at 22:08

Are there any other gardeners out there who "grew up" reading Thalassa Crusoe? Thirty some (or more?) years ago, reading her books was what got me enthusiastic about nurturing a plant and watching it grow. Her books really do give you an appreciation of nature and plants....an old-fashioned Kincaid!

___________________________________

* Posted by buttterflyy z9b FL (My Page) on

Thu, May 25, 06 at 8:35

I didn't know about the books at the time, but there were little articles by her in magazines, and wasn't she on public tv for a time? I loved her!

Linda

________________________________

* Posted by ambersky 9b FL (My Page) on

Thu, May 25, 06 at 9:49

Thanks Maggie, I'll do a library search for her.

____________________________________

* Posted by carmiewest South Florida (My Page) on

Thu, May 25, 06 at 10:04

Amber,

Thank you for posting about these books. I am going to try to get them at the library.

One writer that got me interested in nurturing my garden and growing vegetables was Barbara Kingsolver. She writes non fiction and novels but they are full of descriptions of nature and animals. She grows most of the things her family eats. I specially liked her novel, Prodigal Summer.

Carmen

________________________________

* Posted by ambersky 9b FL (My Page) on

Thu, May 25, 06 at 10:08

The only thing I had read by Kingsolver was "The Poisonwood Bible," and that just blew me away. I'll look for "Prodigal Summer." Thanks!

__________________________________

* Posted by tropicalfreak z10b Hollywood (My Page) on

Thu, May 25, 06 at 10:30

i have a book about the gardens of key west and their stories.... lot's of photos...easy to get lost in...

cliff

____________________________________

* Posted by solstice98 9b Orlando (My Page) on

Wed, Jun 7, 06 at 20:24

Amber,

I picked up The Botany of Desire and I'm loving it!

Johnny Appleseed was a possible pedophile?!?!? Who knew!!!!

Almost all apples were grown for cider, not for eating? Who knew!!!

I downloaded the book from audible(dot)com so I'm listening to it in the car - makes the trip to work each day something to look forward to.

If the apple chapter is this fascinating, I can hardly wait for tulips, cannabis and potatoes.

I also found Seeds of Change and am looking forward to that too.

Thanks!

Kate

___________________________________

* Posted by lyam z9 Tampa FL (My Page) on

Wed, Jun 7, 06 at 20:35

I am on the potato chapter in The Botany of Desire. It is a great book. I keep recommending it to everyone who will listen =) You can really tell the author loves the subject because he writes so well about it. You'll definitly enjoy the other chapters Kate.

After reading the chapter on apples I want to plant apple seeds, especially the wild type, and the same with the other chapters. I guess I could get away with planting tulips an potatoes, but I'll leave the Mary Jane to the pros =)

Thanks for starting this thread. I'm going to read the other suggested books too.

Tim

Witches HEHEHE

Comments (74)

  • mistiaggie
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Butterflygardener...I too had that problem with The Orchid Thief. I felt it lacking in many ways. I did love the history part of Florida. I want to read The Swamp which is supposed to be superb.

    I finished The Grail Bird, about the ivory billed woodpecker rediscovery, a few weeks ago. I highly recommend this book.

  • butterflygardener
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Misti, It is funny. While reading, I so thought of you with your great wildlife pics!
    Kat

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  • AmberSky
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    last modified: 7 years ago

    I've been reading "Seads of Change," but it frustrates me. I can handle popularizations of science and history, if the science and history are good...but too much of this book is bad science.

  • ladywingr
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Just finished reading all (except biography - "Sport of Queens") of Dick Francis' work. Has been quite a challenge, and one that took me 25 years to complete! Dick Francis' books are mysteries that all tie into the sport of horse racing in Britain.

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  • zozzl
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris.

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  • solstice98
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Seeds of Change - I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who thinks this is bad science. And maybe questionable history too. The original copyright is 1985 but it reads more like 1958.

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  • ladywingr
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Re: Vampire books... I read Anne Rice through to "Servant of the Bones" and quit then when I decided my brain was getting too warped. Did the same thing a few years back when I spent a year reading all of Stephen King & Joseph Wambaugh - too much creepy evil for a while... Spent the next year reading Harlequin romances (laughing smiley here)

  • AmberSky
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Zozzl, I ahve the sequil to that, and have never managed to find the first one, so haven't read it yet.
    Christopher Moore (A very favorite writer) has a very funny vampire novel called "Bloodsucking Fiends." If you are looking for more firmly vampish vampire novels, I recomend Chelsea Quinn Yarboro's "Le Compt de Saint Germain," books, or Fred Saberhagen's Dracula books. I like vampire books!

    Solstice, I couldn't agree more. Read like it was written in the 1950's. "The Botony of Desire," or "In Praise of Plants," do a much more creditable job.

  • zozzl
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Ambersky, I have read one by Christopher Moore about Christmas where zombies arise from the dead. It was very funny even though it was at Christmas time. An Angel sent from Heaven at Christmas time misunderstands the wish of a human and mistakenly reanimates dead people (Angels apparently take things very literally). I'll have to get some of his others. I finished the Dead Until Dark book and I am going to get her others as well as more Christopher Moore books.

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    http://www.ocls.lib.fl.us/flashDefault.asp?bhcp=1

    Kate & ladywingr, I like the more modern vamp novels that don't have pages of long,tedious description and explanations. Anne Rice is great but I think she gets so into it she thinks it is real:)

    Pat

  • AmberSky
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Oh, "The Stupidest Angel!" That Angel is from "Lamb" (my very favorite!) and the town and characters are from "The Lust Lizard of Melencholy Cove," which was my introduction to Moore. If you like him, I also recomend Neil Gaiman. He's a totally stellar writer.

  • florah
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I am reading anything and everything "Florida". Right now it is Edna Buchanan's mystery novel "Garden of Evil".

    She mentions African dust blowing across the Atlantic and coming down in Miami. Have you experience this dust?

  • zozzl
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Hey Ambersky,

    I ordered some more C. Moore books and a Gaiman from the library. I also want to read 'Target Underwear in a Vera Wang Dress'. I saw it over at the Target Store. Sometimes I just look through what they have at Target and other stores to see what looks good, but I am too cheap to pay for them:) I do that at Costco too, look at what bestsellers have come out and then get them from the libary. I do buy the Harry Potters because I just love them. You can sign up early at the library even before a book has come out and get the book very quickly when it hits the shelves. Pat

  • AmberSky
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I can see my local branch of the library from my front porch, and they have a great on-line catalog, so like you, I see a book I want, then order it to my branch.

    And yes, the Harry Potter books are just really good!

  • mistiaggie
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I reread HP and the HBP the other day. Can't wait for the next one. Also just finished The Blue Castle by LM Montgomery.

    Florah: We just had a dust storm a few weeks ago that left us some beautiful sunsets.

  • scents_from_heaven
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I must admit I have not had a lot of time lately to read many books. I go through my garden magazines and I read the little Woman's World Mag, but I spend most of my time working on several novels I am writing along with creating more chapters for my children's geography series. It is more fun to me to create my own works than to read others. I envy those of you who have the time. I used to read almost non stop before I began writing. Happy reading and enjoy hearing what you think about different books. Still take time to read my Emily Dickenson poetry. Linda

  • AmberSky
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Oh, that's an interesting twist to the topic, Linda.

    How many of you love poetry? And for those who do, whom is your favorite poet?

    I'm a Walt Whitman girl, myself. Swiftly followed by Edna St Vincent Milay. Uncle Walt has held my hand though many a dark hour.

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I'm not a huge poetry fan, but I always loved the poems of Rilke and Pasternak (yes, the Dr. Zivago guy).

    Here's a little sample of Rilke so you can see why I like his poems.

    Black Cat

    A ghost, though invisible, still is like a place
    your sight can knock on, echoing; but here
    within this thick black pelt, your strongest gaze
    will be absorbed and utterly disappear:

    just as a raving madman, when nothing else
    can ease him, charges into his dark night
    howling, pounds on the padded wall, and feels
    the rage being taken in and pacified.

    She seems to hide all looks that have ever fallen
    into her, so that, like an audience,
    she can look them over, menacing and sullen,
    and curl to sleep with them. But all at once

    as if awakened, she turns her face to yours;
    and with a shock, you see yourself, tiny,
    inside the golden amber of her eyeballs
    suspended, like a prehistoric fly.

    Here is a link that might be useful: Ranier Maria Rilke's poems

  • AmberSky
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Solstice, that is georgous! I didn't know I liked Rilke.

  • abendwolke
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I like reading through my own gardening journal and my favorite reading is actually this gardenweb.

    I agree with Kate, Rilke is one of my favs too:

    The Panther

    His gaze, going past those bars, has got so misted
    with tiredness, it can take in nothing more.
    He feels as though a thousand bars existed,
    and no more world beyond them than before.

    Those supply powerful paddings, turning there
    in tiniest of circles, well might be
    the dance of forces round a center where
    some mighty will stands paralyticly.

    Just now and then the pupils' noiseless shutter
    is lifted. - Then an image will indart,
    down through the limbs' intensive stillness flutter,
    and end its being in the heart.

    [Rainer Maria Rilke]

    Here is a link that might be useful: Der Panther

  • arabesque
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    O gosh. I am so full of responses. And so glad I happened to tune in to this. I have long loved Rilke yet am focused more now on Mary Oliver. Since it's August, I'll repeat her August poem, although I think I posted it once before. I re-read it over and over and never tire of it.

    (from her Pulitzer Prize-winner *American Primitive*, 1978.)

    August

    When the blackberries hang
    swollen in the woods, in the brambles
    nobody owns, I spend

    all day among the high
    branches, reaching
    my ripped arms, thinking

    of nothing, cramming
    the black honey of summer
    into my mouth; all day my body

    accepts what it is. In the dark
    creeks that run by there is
    this thick paw of my life darting among

    the black bells, the leaves; there is
    this happy tongue.

    But, I came to Conversations to talk about a novel and ask if anyone has read or is reading it. It is *Angle of Repose* by William Stegner. I have been mesmerized by Stegner's skill in describing the environment in which scenes take life. Most always his way of talking about the environment is a subtle telling of the underpinning psychic state of Susan, the grandmother through whose eyes we see the world. He is a poet writing a novel.

    Right now I am particularly fascinated that Oliver, her un-eastern, "unpolished" (in her eyes) engineer husband, who is practical, creative and consistently true to himself, takes on growing rose gardens for her in the desert, searching out the most unique barerooted roses around the United States in the earliest days of settling the west. There is such a discussion waiting to happen about their unhappy yet interesting relationship. I hope some of you have read it. I'd love to know how you see it.
    -Arabesque

  • zozzl
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Okay, I don't do deep, meaningful,thoughtful poetry, BUT....

    1 L lama he's a priest,
    2 LL llama he's a beast, but..
    I will bet a silk pajama there isn't any
    3 LLL lllama....

    Ogden Nash:)

    Pat

  • AmberSky
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    It's hard for me to find just a piece of Whitman to share, but here is one that I love.

    The Dalliance of Eagles - Walt Whitman

    SKIRTING the river road, (my forenoon walk, my rest,)
    Skyward in air a sudden muffled sound, the dalliance of the eagles,
    The rushing amorous contact high in space together,
    The clinching interlocking claws, a living, fierce, gyrating wheel,
    Four beating wings, two beaks, a swirling mass tight grappling, 5
    In tumbling turning clustering loops, straight downward falling,
    Till oer the river poisÂd, the twain yet one, a momentÂs lull,
    A motionless still balance in the air, then parting, talons loosing,
    Upward again on slow-firm pinions slanting, their separate diverse flight,
    She hers, he his, pursuing. 10

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Ah, Romance!

  • florah
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kat-butterflygardener,

    I am reading 'The Orchid Thief' right now (on your recommendation). It is absolutely fascinating, especially since I am very interested in Florida history.

    When I bought a Wanda orchid in a small nursery in Leesburg, the nice lady mentioned ominously that Orchid growers and collectors inhabit a very special world. Now I understand what she meant with her warning.

    I would definitely recommend this biography.

  • arabesque
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Ah Amber, what majesty and excitement in that kind of rush of words and energy! ;)

    Here's the middle section of Humpbacks, a Mary Oliver poem for anyone who loves the ocean and whales. It's hard to detach it from the rest which is so worth the read. (from American Primitive)

    HUMPBACKS
    (4th section)

    Three of them
    rise to the surface near the bow of the boat,
    then dive
    deeply, their huge scarred flukes
    tipped to the air.

    We wait, not knowing
    just where it will happen; suddenly
    they smash through the surface, someone begins
    shouting for joy and you realize
    it is yourself as they surge
    upward and you see for the first time
    how huge they are, as they breach,
    and dive, and breach again
    through the shining blue flowers
    of the split water and you see them
    for some unbelievable
    part of a moment against the sky -
    like nothing you've ever imagined -
    like the myth of the fifth morning galloping
    out of darkness, pouring
    heavenward, spinning; then

    they crash back under those black silks
    and we all fall back
    together into that wet fire, you
    know what I mean.

  • arabesque
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Ah Amber, what majesty and excitement in that kind of rush of words and energy! ;)

    Here's the middle section of Humpbacks, a Mary Oliver poem for anyone who loves the ocean and whales. It's hard to detach it from the rest which is so worth the read. (from American Primitive)

    HUMPBACKS
    (4th section)

    Three of them
    rise to the surface near the bow of the boat,
    then dive
    deeply, their huge scarred flukes
    tipped to the air.

    We wait, not knowing
    just where it will happen; suddenly
    they smash through the surface, someone begins
    shouting for joy and you realize
    it is yourself as they surge
    upward and you see for the first time
    how huge they are, as they breach,
    and dive, and breach again
    through the shining blue flowers
    of the split water and you see them
    for some unbelievable
    part of a moment against the sky -
    like nothing you've ever imagined -
    like the myth of the fifth morning galloping
    out of darkness, pouring
    heavenward, spinning; then

    they crash back under those black silks
    and we all fall back
    together into that wet fire, you
    know what I mean.

  • AmberSky
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Right now I'm reading "The Omnivore's Dilema," by Pollan, who is also the author of "The Botany of Desire." Once again he has written a book that I just can't put down.
    Give it 50 pages and see if it doesn't hook you, too.

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Pollan's book has received excellent and interesting reviews. I want to read it but was waiting for the less expensive soft-cover version! I LOVED Botany of Desire.

  • FlowerLady6
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    The Orchid Thief was great! I read lots of books on cottage decorating, cottage gardens, roses, herbs, gardening and fiction as well as inspiring books. Oh yea, books on crocheting and embroidery or shell and other crafts too. Right now I just finished 'The Things We Do For Love' by Kristen Hannah and 'Like a Watered Garden' by Patti Hill. I'm also reading 'The Successful Herb Gardener' by Sally Roth, 'Herbs and Spices for Florida Gardens' by Monica Moran Brandies, and 'It's Not About Me' by Max Lucado.

    I just got my first library card a couple of years ago and love going there to see what interesting and inspiring books I can find. I usually just go down the rows, looking at titles and pull ones out that interest me then read the inside cover to see if I want to check it out.

    I will have to see if I can find some of the titles you all have mentioned here.

    FlowerLady

  • arabesque
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Finished recently - The Book of Salt, by Monique Truong. This first novel received well-deserved high praise. It is a sad, imaginative, beautifully written and fascinating story spun from a quotation concerning an ad for a cook that Monique Truong came across in an Alice B. Toklas' cookbook. The story is the Vietnamese cook's, and intertwines his life with observations on the life and characters of Gloria Stein and Alice B. Toklas during the years they lived in Paris.

    I am reading The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera now and plan The Botany of Desire for the next read after this one.
    -Arabesque

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I just finished 'Theodore Roosevelt: River of Doubt' and really enjoyed it. Then I started 'The Devil in the White City' - a true story about a serial killer during the Chicago Worlds Exposition around the turn of the century. Fascinating and creepy. Interesting stuff there about Olmsted, the landscape god.

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    16 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Here's an interesting thing I just read about Frederick Law Olmsted. You may have thought he was famous just for Central Park and other parks and grounds in the north east, but he made his mark in Chicago too.

    "When you go to the local state or county fair you probably at one point or another make your way to the midway with its carnival rides, sideshows, and games of chance. Did you know that the origin of the term "midway" can be traced to the work of Frederick Law Olmsted? In 1870 the South Park Commission of Chicago hired Olmsted to plan a large park stretching inland from Lake Michigan. Olmsted envisioned two main divisions. The Lower Division (today's Jackson Park) would focus on a lagoon and the Upper Division (today's Washington Park) would center on a large open meadow. Connecting the two would be a 600-foot-wide (200-meter-wide) strip of land with trees and footpaths on either side of a waterway that would run down the middle. Olmsted called this strip of land the Midway Plaisance.
    The great Chicago fire of 1871 prevented Olmsted's plan from being carried out. But two decades later when he was asked to provide the design for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Olmsted incorporated his Midway Plaisance into that design. This time, though, the narrow connector would not serve as a quiet peaceful transition from one section of a park to another but instead would serve as the entertainment district for the exposition. Olmsted wanted to concentrate the noisy and disturbing attractions there so as not to take away from the grand park-like atmosphere of the rest of the grounds. Visitors went to the Midway Plaisance to ride the world's first Ferris wheel, see exotic dancers perform, cheer on Harry Houdini, and sample Juicy Fruit and Cracker Jacks for the first time. Thus the use of the term "midway" for (as Webster's dictionary states) "an avenue at a fair, carnival, or amusement park for concessions and amusements."

  • mistiaggie
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    *bump* for the other person who posted a similar topic.

    I am currently reading Plain Anne Ellis, the second in a series of books an autobiography of a woman who was on the frontier. I didn't read the first, but this one is good.

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Just finished Shadow of the Wind. Slow plot but beautiful use of words. Started Across the Nightingale Floor today.
    Kate

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Forgot to mention that I'm also listening to Ben Bova's Saturn from Audible(dot)com. Can't live without my books on tape!

  • garden_hands_feet
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Greetings!
    I highly recommend "People with Dirty Hands" by Robin Chotzinoff. It one of my re-read specials! I think we have all met folks like the gardening characters in this book. Ms. Chotzinoff also wrote "People Who Sweat." It is great, too. I have found a bit of brain-food and spiritual food in "A Woman's Guide to a Simpler Life" by Andrea Van Steenhouse, PH.D.
    Diana

  • cmeonthewater
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    I've been trying to make more time for reading things for ENJOYMENT (vice textbooks- which I spent way too much of the past years pouring over ;).

    I loved The Kiterunner- read that a few months ago. My mom loved it, too- she borrowed it after puppy-sitting for us last month while we ran around Vegas. :)

    Snow Flower and the Secret Fan is my most recent finish (in Vegas- yeah, I read in Vegas- LOL!)- very good story that was hard to put down. Very sad at times, though.

    I'm reading The Memory Keeper right now. :)

  • beth7happy
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    It's hard to imagine that I got through school without reading this: THE YEARLING !!!! (however, there probably are few of you who've read Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys, either!! Hahhahahaa)...(that's what ya get for growing up in Vermont! ANYway...I decided to read The Yearling...OMG...what a story! ...and how neat it is to hear about all the references to old Florida! and now, of course, I have Crosscreek checked out, as well. My daughter and I read Girl with the Pearl Earring together-long distance! (she's in Phoenix, but we shared the story as we went along). We've been talking about 'old classics' that somehow we've missed....... so..there are my current readings.....am reading Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistlestop Cafe right now...... sooo cute!

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Anyone else read Across the Nightingale Floor and Grass for his Pillow? Amazing tales of true love, special powers, assassins, Oriental culture, etc. Highly recommended. If you like SciFi or Fantasy, you'll find these hard to put down. Lovely use of words, great story, cool characters.

    Kate

  • julieyankfan
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Just finished World War Z by Max Brooks about the world's battle against the zombies. It was one of the best books I have ever read!!! So intelligently written. You can replace "zombie" with birdflu, aids, or any other disease and it would scare the heck out of you to think that this is probably how the governments of the world would react. Of course, people with birdflu don't reanimate and come after you!lol

    I read that the rights to the book were already bought by Brad Pitt and one of the big studios. Should be a good movie.
    Julie

  • carmiewest
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    After I finished reading The Omnivore's Dilemma, I read Fast Food Nation and now I am reading The Way we Eat by Peter Singer and Jim Mason. The more I read the angrier I get at the way food is produced in America. I think all three are excellent books.

    By the way, I got them on audiotape at the library.

  • julieyankfan
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Just finished Dead Wrong, by J.A. Jance. Not bad, but she's getting like all the other popular writers. It seems they write these books on their spare time to keep up with their contract.

    I see that they made Fast Food Nation into a movie.

    Julie

  • mistiaggie
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Just read Nights in Rodanthe by Nicholas Sparks. Good but not The Notebook.

  • zozzl
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Somebody here told me about Neil Gaiman. Terrific writer! I have just started his book, Fragile Things, a collection of short stories. He does know how to spin a tale!

    Gobble, gobble everyone:)

    Pat

  • carmiewest
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kate,

    I emailed you the other day about a book. Did you receive my email?

    Carmen

  • julieyankfan
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Just finished Echo Park by Michael Connelly. Good book, but he's starting to get predictable with the characters, too.

  • solstice98
    Original Author
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Carmen,
    Yes, I received it. Sorry I haven't responded. Been going through some health issues with my mother and haven't been on line at all or even checking my emails for more than a few seconds each day. I'll get back to you shortly!
    Kate

  • carmiewest
    15 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    Kate,
    Don't worry about answering. I am sorry to hear about your mom. I hope she will get better soon. I just didn't know if my message had gone through GardenWeb.
    Carmen

  • natgreeneveg
    12 years ago
    last modified: 7 years ago

    In case anyone missed the PBS special The Botany of Desire which premiered Wednesday, October 28, 2009, you can still watch the entire program online. It's incredible. Book turned documentary.

    BOTANY OF DESIRE is a documentary which tells the utterly original story of everyday plants and the way they have domesticated humankind. An interpretation of the relationship between plants and people. This two-hour documentary explores plant evolution and takes viewers from the potato fields of Peru and Idaho, the apple forests of Kazakhstan, and the tulip markets of Amsterdam.

    View online in it's entirety: here

    This is another related program by the same presenter on LINK TV (a cable access channel) which is timely:

    Deep Agriculture
    Traditional methods of agriculture in most developed nations have long ignored environmental concerns. Factors such as soil erosion, water shortage and the impact of chemicals on bio-systems have been overlooked in favour of massive crop yields and cheaper food. But what impact does this have on our health and our environment?

    View online in it's entirety: here

    __________________________

    Sit down with a cup of tea or coffee and witness the evolution of an Organic Kitchen Garden.