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behlgarden

Can someone identify the roses in my garden?

behlgarden
11 years ago

I inherited 48 rose bushes that are about 8-10 years old. The previous owner was Asian and had a great taste for plants and I ended up with 48 rose bushes of different colors, lots of exotic fruit trees, etc.

here is the link to the two roses that I took pictues of, rest I will post later. Please let me know if you can identify what kind of roses these are so I can take appropriate care of these.
{{gwi:310496}}Roses

Comments (23)

  • jacqueline9CA
    11 years ago

    Hard to tell for sure, but they look like hybrid teas to me. I see you are in zone 9 - what part of the country? Is the warm summer there humid, or dry? Your roses look sort of stunted, so the first thing I would do is to give them LOTS of water. As long as the drainage is OK, you cannot overwater. Then after at least a week, I would feed them - just get any rose food from a nursery and follow the directions. Then see what happens. They should get bigger. Then if they want to grow, I would let them grow for a few months to see what they do. If they are hybrid teas you should (in zone 9) prune them in December or January.

    Look up your local rose society near where you live - there will be lots of folks there who would even come to look at them and help you. Good luck!

    Jackie

  • behlgarden
    Original Author
    11 years ago

    Thanks for response. Yes, these roses are not only stunned but got spider mites and fungus as well. previous Owner got these catalogue ordered and planted 9-10 years ago. then at some point these were left at the mercy of mother nature. They got deep roots and are in planter on top of a cliff so it drains very well.

    Its been 6 weeks since I moved and started watering and fertilizing and I saw a burst of bloom already. its a lot of work to keep dead heading 48 bushes. Now I have water schedule 3 min each time, twice a day daily with 4 GPH drippers. these bushes are now getting about 3 galons of water per week.

    Although I seee growth returning back to normal, I cant wait to get rid of the mites, bugs, and fungus. going to drip irrigation was one way to avoid fungus.

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  • rosetom
    11 years ago

    Peace is the white-yellow with pink edges. It's a bit more pink than mine usually gets in my climate, but I've seen them look that way sometimes. The clinchers are the leaves and the buds in the background at top left and right bottom.

    I'm just guessing on the orange, but perhaps Folklore? It would help if we had more scenes of the leaves and buds in addition to the bloom. Is it very tall?

  • rosetom
    11 years ago

    Whoa! Just spotted that 3rd pic! That's quite a garden of roses, there. The canes look large and very mature, so you should get some consistent and large blooms on a regular basis.

    However, if that's Peace and Folklore above, you probably need to get on a regular spray regimen to keep them healthy. The Bayer Disease Control is a good choice and easily available - just be sure you don't get one of the Bayer all-in-one products - just the Disease Control spray.

  • ken-n.ga.mts
    11 years ago

    The orange rose looks like Tropicana to me. That 3rd pic shows a bunch of VERY mature bushs. A bunch of years old. Water,water, water. Go easy on the fert. until next spring.

  • jerijen
    11 years ago

    Please -- Your location! There are probably good folks in your area who can be helpful. I'm thinking you're in Southern California?

    Jeri

  • roseseek
    11 years ago

    I honestly try never to do this, I can't tell you what the orange one IS, but it is NOT Tropicana. Form, texture and color are all wrong. It IS beautiful, but Tropicana, it is not. Kim

  • ingrid_vc so. CA zone 9
    11 years ago

    I would also suggest some kind of mulch to keep the roots cool in what looks like a very sunny and warm spot. I've noted a big improvement in my roses after I mulched them with a thick layer of decomposed leaves that were under our pepper trees. They put out tons of new growth and buds almost immediately. Healthy roses are also much more able to fight off disease and insect infestations. I never spray and have little disease, but on the other hand I don't have hybrid teas which are much more difficult to grow well than older varieties of roses. Good luck!

    Ingrid

  • behlgarden
    Original Author
    11 years ago

    I appreciate all the responses. Yesterday the system did not let me comment here. Yes, in Riverside county in Los Angeles Suburb, in summer months it gets to above 85 degrees average temperature and its dry. All roses are along the fence line in a very well drained planter. I do plan to mulch the planter, any recommendations on what type of mulch for roses?

  • seil zone 6b MI
    11 years ago

    There are lots of rose societies in LA. Contact one of them and have someone come out and look at your roses in person. They will be better able to ID them that way. And you'll meet a lot of nice people who will be happy to help you with specifics for your area. Advice from other areas can only be general. For instance we have little problems with rust in Michigan but I understand it's a much bigger problem in California. Advice from a local will be the most help to you. You can find a listing of local rose societies at the American Rose Society's web site.

  • particentral
    11 years ago

    that is nowhere NEAR enough water for the plants that size. They need a lot ore water than that. I run mine on 1 gph drippers twice a day for an hour. :) they are doing great. 3 gallons a week in well drained, HOT climate is not enough water.

  • behlgarden
    Original Author
    11 years ago

    I increased the timer to 4 min, twice a day on 4 GPH drippers. that gets 1/2 of what you put in in your bushes. My problem is that system is tied to guava trees and they dont like too much water. I have lowered the pressure on guava trees now. I plan on tilling/levelling the soil around the rose bushes and doing heavy mulch, burry the drippers close to the bush root. then I will increase the timing to 6 minutes, twice a day = 12 minutes total, it will get about 6 gal/week/plant. I got 48 bushes to worry about. LOL

  • jacqueline9CA
    11 years ago

    Don't till the soil - you will disturb the rose roots, and the good soil wildlife. Just mulch - maybe 2 inches worth, but do not put it right up to touching the rose canes - leave a little space around them.

    Best advice you have gotten is to contact local rose folks and get some hands on advice. Good luck!

    Jackie

  • particentral
    11 years ago

    Mine get 2 gallons a DAY of water. Not a week......I said that 3 gallons a week is nowhere near enough. You are giving a quart of water twice a day. Mine are getting 4 times the water you are giving yours, IF the drippers are actually putting out that much. If you do not have enough pressure they will not put out the amount they say they will put out. I would bet they aren't looking at the bushes. Especially in elevated planters they need a lot of water. I am dealing with well over 100 bushes here. :) Its the feeder roots in the 12 inches around the plant that get the water drawn up into the plant in roses. Not a good idea to put the dripper really close to the plant as it can cause cane or crown rotting.

  • jerijen
    11 years ago

    As several have said, local advice will be the best advice for you.

    You won't find an ARS Rose Society in Riverside, but there is an active Rose Society in Palm Springs, which might be helpful to you. Or Inland Valley Rose Society, in San Bernardino. Maybe Mountain View R.S.?

    Find contacts for these societies at the address below.

    In your area, summer temperatures of 100 degrees won't be unheard-of at all. Your soil is fairly sandy, too. Mulch for your rose bed IS an essential, and will help the roots retain a little moisture, and keep them relatively cool. Any good ground-cover mulch will do. We use "Western Bark" sort of stuff, which you can buy at any Home Depot garden store.

    If your drip system is keyed to the needs of your trees, and in summer weather, that is not enough for your roses. You can supplement this with a hand-watering, say, every other day. It's a nice, mindless, relaxing sort of activity, so barring hose-kinks, I sort of enjoy that.

    Jeri

    Here is a link that might be useful: Local ARS Rose Societies

  • roseseek
    11 years ago

    Check the drainage before dumping a ton of water in the strip. How old is the house? That is a created, engineered slope. For some years, it is law in California to compact the soil to up to a 98 percentile to provide seismic stability. That kind of compaction does NOT drain. Been there, dealt with it for many years in Los Angeles and the Santa Clarita Valley. I've heard all the "dig a big hole, put in rocks for 'drainage' and replant with amended soil". NOPE. You get a bucket full of rocks and soured soil.

    If those planters are raised sufficiently and have had enough loosened soil added to provide for somewhere for the roots and water to go, there may not be a problem. But, if it's normal SoCal compacted drek, more water will pool on the surface, run off and any that percolates through the root balls into the holes made for them to fit in will pool, fill the holes and rot plants. I know they've been there a long time, but the previous owner could well have determined the setting he chose was what was needed for the situation. Kim

  • behlgarden
    Original Author
    11 years ago

    OK, the fence line that you see sits on top of a slope and base of the planter probably has compacted fill that is mixture of soil and cementitious product for stability. The planters appear to be added on and are about 18" tall and fill is very fertile. I was able to dit it quite easily when I planted one rose bush at location where there was one missing. The planters also drain quite well as they have holes at the base.

    If there was problem of subgrade or drainage, the roses would not have survived for this long. The slope is watered by the City and my take is that rose bushes may have found its roots way deep, more than 6-8 feet in search for water as these bushes were not watered for almost 12-18 months and they still survived.

    I have increased the watering of roses to 5 gal/week. Now the question is do I water it all 7 days OR water every other day and increase the time I water? I think every other day would result in deep watering due to longer period of drip.

    I will get in touch with Rose society. I found one in Riverside which is very close to where I live. Hopefully I can get an expert to look at it.

    Thanks for comments and help.

  • roseseek
    11 years ago

    Congratulations on finding drainage! I've dealt with too many situations where there was NONE, yet the homeowner still wanted "a garden". Not an easy thing to do in that situation.

    How deep is the soil damp? If what's below the plants is wet, you may not need to raise the rate nor frequency. Does the upper soil in the feeder root zone dry out quickly, perhaps more quickly than the sub soil lower under ground? If you're finding nicely damp to wet soil deeper under the plants, but the top layers dry out more quickly, keep the schedule less time but more frequency. And, get the mulch on it to keep the upper soil more insulated and damper. Kim

  • behlgarden
    Original Author
    11 years ago

    I will do a digging test for moisture in one area where there is a bit wider gap between two bushes. that will tell me the condition of soil.

    I am worried about some of the plants that are infected though and I will get someone to look at it. worst case, if Organocide doesnt work, what would be the most powerful thing that I can spray? everytime I get in contact with the bushes, I get an insect bite here or there. I want to get rid of all mites. I have spotted spider mites there.

  • roseseek
    11 years ago

    Well, this is the lowest tech advice you can follow. You can find it discussed here on GW if you search "spider mites". The mites love hot, dry and dusty conditions. Your plants are water stressed, that's a given. Get out early in the mornings with a water wand and drench the plants with plain old water. The water wand permits to to flush the under sides of the leaves where you'll find the webs and most of the mites. Wash them really well and repeat this a couple of times a week at first, then you can probably taper off.

    You'll be cleaning off the dust, dirt, chemicals, smog and bugs with their webs as well as hydrating the plants. Leaves take in water just as they release it to the air. Bathing your roses will jump start them like you won't believe. You'll drown many of the insects and make conditions so unfavorable for many others, they'll leave.

    Why put any more chemicals on the plants or in your garden during this heat when what will most likely be the most beneficial and effective is good old fashioned water? You do need a water wand for best results. You need to be able to reach inside the plant and thoroughly rinse off the backs of the foliage. Kim

    Here is a link that might be useful: {{gwi:285419}}

  • behlgarden
    Original Author
    11 years ago

    Thanks for all the help here folks. I took the advise and increased watering dramatically, I did the water wand as suggested and did a complete soaker to the planters, drenched the rose bushes in water.

    I also put another dose of organicide mixed with BT, it caused the most infected plants to shed leaves by turning yellow. But I see new wonderful growth everywhere. I have fertilized and am watering a lot now.

    My only regret is not mulching, I have to put my garden lights in the planters and I want to mulch after the wire is burried so I dont disturb the planter fill.

    I will post some really nice rose pictures in about 10-days. I can see a burst of bloom coming. few roses had fragrance that I cant even describle, it almost felt as if someone sprayed concentrated rose essence on the flower, LOL, Love it! Many thanks.

  • seil zone 6b MI
    11 years ago

    I'm glad to hear that they're doing better and I look forward to those pictures!

  • nastarana
    11 years ago

    I would think it very likely that people in your local rose society may have been acquainted with the person who planted the roses at your property.

    They, and the former owner him or herself, if still alive, might well be delighted to see someone refurbihing what must have been a notable rose garden.