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dedtired

Make ahead gravy from turkey wings?

dedtired
9 days ago
last modified: 9 days ago

We are having a chicken dinner pie instead of turkey for TG. I want to make turkey gravy to go with it, just to give a nod to tradition. I bought two pounds of turkey wings. Whats the best way to make a decent gravy in advance?

Roast the wings first and make stock or stew the wings?

Every recipe i read online says something different. Anyone have a tried and true version ?

Comments (35)

  • rob333 (zone 7a)
    9 days ago

    Watching with great interest because I have a pound of wings, along with 8 oz of turkey stock...


    Here's why I bought what I did

    https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/make-ahead-turkey-gravy-3364146

    dedtired thanked rob333 (zone 7a)
  • glenda smith
    9 days ago

    add skimmed fat from wing to boiler pan, stir flour, then juices from turkey, adding broth, sometimes add a cube of chicken bullion if needed then broth, usually add chicken broth for more liquid, and shred up bits of meat for texture.. Chill till ready to serve. Might need more liquid then

    dedtired thanked glenda smith
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  • dedtired
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Glenda, stew the wings and skim off fat? Dont roast them first, right?

  • glenda smith
    9 days ago

    cook first, then skim off the fat

    Let all cool and fat rises to the top of liquid and skim off

    FASTER, put in refrigerator and when cooled skim fat off the top

    dedtired thanked glenda smith
  • dedtired
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Okay got it thanks. A lot of recipes say to roast the wings first and then stew.

  • chloebud
    9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    I found this several years ago on another food forum. It’s good! You can adjust the amounts as needed.

    Make-Ahead Turkey Gravy

    3 lbs turkey wings (4)
    2 medium onions, peeled and quartered
    1 cup water
    8 cups chicken broth
    3/4 cup chopped carrots
    1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
    3/4 cup flour
    2 T. butter
    Salt and pepper, to taste

    Heat oven to 400.
    Arrange wings in a single layer in a large roasting pan and place onions on top. Roast 1 1/4 hours or until wings are browned.

    Put wings and onions in a 5-6 quart pot.

    Add water to roasting pan and stir to scrape up any brown bits on the bottom. Add the brown bits to the pot.
    Add 6 cups broth (chill the remaining 2 cups), add carrot, thyme and bring to a boil.

    Reduce heat and simmer uncovered 1 1/2 hours.
    Remove wings to cutting board. Save meat for another use or discard.

    Strain broth into a 3 quart saucepan, pressing vegetables to extract as much liquid as possible. Discard vegetables and skim off fat. (If time permits, refrigerate broth overnight to make fat skimming easier.)

    Whisk flour into remaining 2 cups broth until well blended.
    Bring broth in pot to a gentle boil. Whisk in broth flavored mixture and boil 3-4 minutes to thicken gravy and cook flour. Stir in butter, salt and pepper.
    Serve or freeze up to 6 months.

    ETA - My notes say the source of this was Woman’s Day magazine.

    dedtired thanked chloebud
  • Eileen
    9 days ago
    last modified: 9 days ago

    I roast them first. That's how you make gravy from a whole turkey. You can then simmer them with chicken stock, onion, celery, and herbs to make the gravy from the drippings. But legs are even better than wings as they'll release more fat.

    dedtired thanked Eileen
  • glenda smith
    9 days ago

    I love giblets in my turkey gravy

    dedtired thanked glenda smith
  • maifleur03
    9 days ago

    You can do the cook first but the flavor will not be the same as if you roasted the wings and used that fat even if after stewing you would then roast. You could intensify the flavor if the wings come with their tips by removing the tips then cook them longer than the rest of the wing but not burnt. Place in a small amount of water similar to what you would use for the gravy and simmer for a while. Use that water to make the gravy.

    dedtired thanked maifleur03
  • carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
    9 days ago

    I think you want them browned before stewing - otherwise the gravy would be kind of bland, wouldn't it?

    I use a seasoning blend with a lot of sweet paprika in it for roasting, which gives the gravy a really good color & flavor.


    dedtired thanked carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b
  • Judi
    9 days ago

    I did that one year. Roasted, then simmered in water.

    dedtired thanked Judi
  • happy2b…gw
    8 days ago

    I am definitely going to make the gravy ahead with one of these recipes. Silly me never thought of make ahead gravy, but I have wished it when I am standing at the stove stirring when everyone anxiously awaits to eat.

  • dedtired
    Original Author
    8 days ago

    Im using a recipe very similar to Chloebud’s. Wont be finished until tomorrow, but i will report back and let you know.

  • rob333 (zone 7a)
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    Annie!

    My sister! Yeah, kitty and I enjoy those sorts of things. Mom put those in the gravy, but I liked that thing, and she liked that thing, but nobody else did. Giblet gravy has long since lost favor.


  • dedtired
    Original Author
    8 days ago

    Hi Annie. You reminded me that my mother did that, too, with the giblets. No flavor left unused. I don't like giblet gravy. Guess the dog got them and later the fox!

  • maifleur03
    8 days ago

    I put the giblets in the stuffing/dressing depending on if it was cooked in the bird or in a pan. A suggestion for the gravy is to use flour as the thickener rather than cornstarch even though it will make it less clear. I have found cornstarch will not rewarm and will become watery if reheated. Sometimes even adding additional cornstarch when rewarming will not thicken it. The flour type can either be thickened or thinned when rewarmed. I have found making it slightly thick then adding chicken broth when bringing back to serving temperature also works if you plan on making it ahead of time.

    dedtired thanked maifleur03
  • happy2b…gw
    8 days ago

    One of my granddaughters has Celiac, so I was planning to use corn starch in the gravy. After reading what Malfleur wrote, I am reconsidering using corn starch. Has anyone used gluten free flour with good results?

    dedtired thanked happy2b…gw
  • annie1992
    8 days ago

    My daughter is also celiac, but she doesn't really like gravy anyway. I thicken soups with dried potato flakes sometimes, and I might try that with gravy. I did try using the King Arthur flour blend but as most things, it was a bit gritty. I have thought of mixing it with the stock and letting it sit for 10 minutes or so, then making gravy, instead of starting with a roux, but I haven't done that yet. Letting the batter/dough made with gluten free flours sit for about 10 minutes does seem to reduce the grit.


    Rob, we are sisters for sure, LOL.


    dedtired, Hi right back at you.


    Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.


    Annie



    dedtired thanked annie1992
  • sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
    8 days ago

    Any gluten-free flours will work fine i think. I made my vegetarian/gluten-free gravy over the weekend. I used rice flour. SeriousEats gluten-free gravy

    I also roast my parts along with a quartered onion, a carrot, and some celery chopped.

    Veg/GF stock for gravy i also roast the vegetables and add leek tops to the simmering stock. Reconstituted wid mushrooms and a bit of miso. In the past i've added a quartered potato to the roasting veg as all goes in the blender. The rice flour worked really well. I also make a veg/g-free wild rice stuffing/dressing so i have a pint of vegetable stock for that as well.

    Don't forget the 'keep warm' tricks. A crock pot or a pot inside a pot as a BainMarie. Add water in the big pot 2/3rd's up the sides of the smaller pot.

    I can keep both gravies warm in the crockpot and the mashed potatoes warm on the back right burner. Nice way to keep things warm for refilling serving dishes during the initial sit-down. Stuffiing and roasted veg goes in the warm oven when the turkeys comes out to rest.





    dedtired thanked sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
  • nicole___
    8 days ago

    sleevendog...that's pretty nice!

  • happy2b…gw
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Thanks for the tips on gluten free gravy.

  • dedtired
    Original Author
    7 days ago

    Ta-dah! I did it and it is delicious! Here’s the turkey and vegetables going in the oven.

    And here is the finished gravy


    And here is the link to the recipe. I made these changes. Obviously used more turkey wings (2 lbs), and no thyme, garlic or cayenne pepper just because we dont like those things. I did add just a smidge of Kitchen Bouquet (1/4 teaspoon at most) to make it browner.;Yay, me! And you! Thanks.

    Make ahead turkey gravy

  • dedtired
    Original Author
    7 days ago

    Oh darn, link didnt work. On Allrecipes, it is called Chef John’s Make-Ahead Turkey Gravy.

    Ingredients

    • 1 large onion, chopped

    • 2 carrots, chopped

    • 2 ribs celery, chopped

    • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil

    • 2 large turkey wings

    • 2 tablespoons cold water

    • 10 cups cold water

    • 4 sprigs fresh thyme

    • 2 cloves garlic

    • 3 tablespoons butter

    • ½ cup all-purpose flour

    • 1 pinch cayenne pepper, or to taste

    • salt and ground black pepper to taste

    Directions

    1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

    2. Combine onion, carrots, celery, and vegetable oil in a large roasting pan and toss to coat. Place turkey wings on top of vegetables.

    3. Roast in the preheated oven until turkey wings are browned and vegetables are caramelized and softened, 45 to 60 minutes.

    4. Transfer turkey wings and vegetables to a large stockpot. Place the roasting pan over a stovetop burner set to medium heat. Pour 2 tablespoons cold water into the pan and bring to a boil, scraping up any browned bits. Transfer mixture to the stockpot and add 10 cups cold water, thyme, and garlic.

    5. Bring turkey wing mixture to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, until meat falls off the bone, about 3 hours. Skim off turkey fat throughout the process and set aside 2 tablespoons.

    6. Strain turkey stock and reserve 6 cups of stock; discard all the solids.

    7. Heat butter and 2 tablespoons reserved turkey fat in a large saucepan over medium heat. Sprinkle in flour and cook, whisking constantly, until it begins to smell like cooked pie crust, 2 to 3 minutes. Slowly pour in reserved turkey stock, whisking constantly.

    8. Increase heat to high and simmer gravy until thick and warmed through, about 5 minutes. Season with cayenne, salt, and pepper.

  • annie1992
    7 days ago

    You go, girl! And happy Thanksgiving.


    Annie

    dedtired thanked annie1992
  • OutsidePlaying
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Looking good, ded. I use the method almost exactly like the one Chloebud posted. I dint use water, just chicken stock, salt and pepper, a little thyme, onion, celery and carrots. I made my turkey wings and the base this afternoon and put it in the refrigerator. I’ll thicken Thursday morning and then reheat it before the big meal.

    dedtired thanked OutsidePlaying
  • happy2b…gw
    7 days ago

    The market did not have any turkey wings today. Instead I got a package of legs and thighs. Should be okay.

    dedtired thanked happy2b…gw
  • dedtired
    Original Author
    7 days ago

    Annie, happy thanksgiving to you and your whole fam damily!

  • John Liu
    7 days ago

    Thank you! I'm going to try this make-ahead gravy! SWMBO has vetoed the cauliflower puree, insisting on (truffle) mashed potatoes. So I'll contribute the gravy.

    dedtired thanked John Liu
  • sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
    7 days ago

    dedtired, excellent looking gravy and recipe. I saved it and printed. We are always asked how DH makes our gravy. I do add a few whole peppercorns and a couple bay leaves to the stockpot. And alway eyeball the amount of water. Vegetables and wings are all different sizes. Especially onions.

    I put the roasted wings/legs in the stock pot first, then cover with the roasted veg. Then just to barely cover with water. Then my leek tops barely in the water. Veg, especially onion and celery, are full of water. Within a half hour or so, all is under liquid. Makes a much richer stock.


    dedtired thanked sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
  • rob333 (zone 7a)
    7 days ago

    I'll second the kitchen bouquet idea. After I finished it, it looked so beige and I wanted it darker. Tasted great, but we do feast with our eyes.

    dedtired thanked rob333 (zone 7a)
  • lisa_fla
    6 days ago

    I use the same recipe as Cloebud i made it today, It’s all ready to warm ip in the crockpot on Thursday. DH came home and remarked how good it smells. Easy and delish. i use turkey broth.

    dedtired thanked lisa_fla
  • sushipup2
    6 days ago

    In my long hours in the hospital, I watched endless Food Network shows, mainly to avoid the political ads. Here's Alex's recipe from an episode of The Kitchen.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSouAAw1KfI

    dedtired thanked sushipup2
  • linda campbell
    5 days ago

    I don't make my turkey gravy ahead, but I do use home made chicken stock to add to the stuff in the pan to amke more. Usually I take the giblets miins the liver which I don't like the flavor of in my gravy, and while the turkey is roasting, I boil them and the neck with a chunked up onion, andt he leaves from the celery I put into the dressing a bay leaf, some pepper corns and salt and sillmer that, adding water as needed, for about as long as the turkey is cooking>.

    As for thickening, I always use flour because I like the taste....but for when a Gluten free friend comes for dinner. I find corn starch can get "ropey" when over cooked....then it goes thin and watery. Tapioca flour is a good alternative.

    Lots of gravy is a good thing.....good for the leftovers too!

  • Eileen
    5 days ago

    I simmer the neck and vegetables with chicken stock too. I never start with water for gravy, soups, and stew. You won't get as deep a flavor with water.

    Ded, I would've put the wings flat side down in the pan and the vegetables on top and around them. You want the turkey to make brown bits, not just the vegetables. You don't really get a rich turkey gravy with wings or drumsticks though. I stopped buying turkey breast and separate pieces for gravy for that reason. I cook a Lil' Butterball turkey now, which is about eight pounds. It's more turkey than we need but I want rich gravy.

    dedtired thanked Eileen