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Need advice on reglazing old tub and new drain

H Briz
last month

I just bought an old cast iron tub and the finish is in great shape but the color is "persion brown" and I don't think I can decorate around it. So I am thinking I should consider reglazing it in white but, if I do this, want to get a pro who uses the best type of material so it will last at least 20 years and wanted to know what others experience has been and if anyone has had a good outcome, which company and material did they use?

In my research, one company says they use acrylic aliphatic poly-glass urethane and another uses Acrylic Polymer and claims it will last 25 years +.

Are there any pros that can offer advice and give some insight on the best way to go? I live in Los Angeles.

I also need advice on how to find out what drain will work with this tub.


Thank you in advance. I love Houzz. :)


Comments (62)

  • Debbie Downer
    last month

    Well we can all be thankful you dont have one.

    H Briz thanked Debbie Downer
  • ptreckel
    last month

    Here is an article that addresses how to decorate around the many shades of vintage beige bath fixtures. In the absence of a matching sink or toilet, I would go with white. But this is interesting!! https://retrorenovation.com/2016/08/23/decorate-beige-bathroom-1927-1962/comment-page-2/

    H Briz thanked ptreckel
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  • Debbie Downer
    last month

    OP, if the beige illustrations are not same shade (Persian Brown) thats OK, they can still inspire similar color schemes just using different shades/tones that may be more sympatico with your Persian Brown.

    I have a suggestion - maybe start a new thread and pose this as a challenge? Just for fun, and who knows, maybe something useful would come out of it. Your Plan B can always be refinish + re-refinishing it from time to tie. For me it would super-interesting because I've long asserted there are no bad colors, only bad color combinations and I would be interested in testing the theory! Truthfully on its own it is rather ..... OK, Ill say it - ugly. But what if it was in context of other colors that made it read more like a warm beige or brown rather than a sickly fleshtone color?

    H Briz thanked Debbie Downer
  • PRO
    Floored You: TileDesigners
    last month

    If you want to use that tub, it will need to be used in it's original color. No service exists that will refire that with new porcelain. Not any longer. The EPA's ban on lead in porcelain has run every service like that out of the US. You could do a great pink and beige vintage look!


    Daltile's new RIgid Clay line in Brick can work with that color very well. https://www.daltile.com/products/wall/rigid-clay/brick




    H Briz thanked Floored You: TileDesigners
  • PRO
    Sabrina Alfin Interiors
    last month

    How much room do you have? Might a Japanese style soaking tub be a better solution? Signature Hardware has several round soaking tubs (I believe the smallest is 41" diameter). Agree with Beth that by the time you're done with the labor of re-glazing, you could have thrown the $ at a new tub.

  • H Briz
    Original Author
    last month

    I have a 4' x 4' space. So the only way to get a decent size tub is to use the exact neo-angle tub I had before (which I finally was able to find one) because it is basically the same inside dimensions as a 5' tub because it is on an angle and why the drain overflow is off center. It is a genius design to give a nice size tub in such a small space. We have no other place for a tub in the bathroom except where my husband tore out my closets and dressing table. I have lived with my clothes in the garage now for 12 years and I want closets back and I also want the safer tub. The giant tea for two tub is dangerous and I fell twice. I hate it. I miss the old layout more than I can say and the only way to get that layout is to use this tub. So my only choice is now to decide if I keep the tub the brown color and find a clever way to make it work or to refinish it white to match the sink and toilet.

  • H Briz
    Original Author
    last month

    Believe me, if there was a tub I could have bought new, I would have done it. I have been researching options off and on ever since my husband destroyed my layout. I even looked into the the possibility of having one custom made in copper or stainless steel with the exact same neo-angle shape but I was told $15,000 to $20,000. And there are no companies that make custom tubs out of fiberglass. I thought Jacuzzi would based on their ads and contacted them but turns out they can't make a tub at an angle with the offset drains.

  • H Briz
    Original Author
    last month

    TileDesigner - thank for your help!! I like your idea.

  • H Briz
    Original Author
    last month

    Debbie Downer - thank you for your great suggestion, too! I am uplifted, not down. :) I feel hopeful I can make this work with the original brown and might just be more interesting in the end.

  • H Briz
    Original Author
    last month

    and nothing better, in my opinion, than a cinderella tub and the neo-angle corner design is genius. I love the built in seats and that it is nice size tub that fits in such s small space. I remember the one I had for so long was a dream and I was sick to lose it. I absolutely hate the big "tea for two" tub. It is very uncomfortable and unsafe.


  • PRO
    Debbi Washburn
    last month

    That is an awesome tub! Depending on the layout of the room, I think you may be able to use it as is and design a spa like space with lighter tones of the tub and creams and wood features.




    As far as the drain, don't over think it. I would go with the simple toe touch drain.


    Good luck!!

    H Briz thanked Debbi Washburn
  • ptreckel
    last month

    And as Debbie Downer suggested, repost this as a challenge for those of us who want to make it work for you!!! Think in terms of whites, creams, natural woods….. all back on trend right now. Even terrazzo flooring with cream, brown and gold speckles! Gold accents. Period style wallpaper? Fun!

    H Briz thanked ptreckel
  • Debbie Downer
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Love the Rigid Clay brick color above - it's spot on. The money you save not reglazing can be spent on just the right tile and maybe a color consultant who can see your space in person and verify the color of the tub in question. Houzz forums have their benefit but there are limitations re: how fine tuned color recommendations can be - due to differences in monitors, lighting conditions. etc etc. Lots of variables. In the meantime, just for fun.... here's some other colors in the American Standard line.... these same colors would have been availabe as tiles, so people could mix and match. That P.B. is kind of growing on me.... its like malted milkshake color. Mint green and white would take it in a whole nother direction!



    H Briz thanked Debbie Downer
  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    last month

    I had to remove some of that professionally applied epoxy from a Corian countertop years ago. If there were a nuclear attack, that stuff would still be stuck to that countertop. I made about $9.00 an hour on that one.


    If you get the right stuff and applicator, it's permanent, believe me.

    H Briz thanked Joseph Corlett, LLC
  • ptreckel
    last month

    Given the revival of more organic colors in decor—creams, beiges, gold tones, creamy marbles—-your Persian Brown tub is cutting edge. Good advice from Debbie Downer. Get some professional advice regarding tiles, wallpapers, vanity, etc. that would be appropriate with your Cinderella tub! It is difficult for us to try and color match from our devices. But please keep us in the loop as you move forward! Loving this!

    H Briz thanked ptreckel
  • H Briz
    Original Author
    last month

    Thank you soooo much to all for the FANTASTIC, helpful and very encouraging advice. As I proceed, I will post updates. I am so excited to do this now. xxxxooooo

  • Debbie Downer
    last month

    FWIW, the bottom of a bathtub will get way more water exposure than a countertop. I would expect SOME peeling in a tub ... maybe very little, maybe a lot depending on useage. As I wrote other than a peeled bottom (easily cured with a bath mat) my tub is still nice and shiny and white on the rim and sides - and I consider the $400 I spent on it 20 yrs ago to have been money well spent. It is what it is - useful for some situations - like youre expecting a complete bathroom remodel in 10 or 20 years. But maybe not others - like there are other more permanent options open to you.

    H Briz thanked Debbie Downer
  • H Briz
    Original Author
    10 days ago
    last modified: 10 days ago

    Hello everyone. It has taken me a lot of effort to FINALLY identify the correct color of this 1958 American Standard tub. It is NOT Persian Brown (which turns out to be close but a little lighter and more pink). The name of this color Bermuda Coral. I was able to buy a chip from a broken bermuda coral toilet tank to confirm and get matching paint for sending to tile places to help me find tile. I am going to attach the pictures of that chip below on white paper and next to some other colors. There is a coral/pink/brown marble floor at a nursing home in Gardena that includes the color so I took a picture of the chip on that, too.

    I would love to get ideas on input from others on what direction I should go.

    A color person at the paint store where I got a matching paint from the chip suggested that I should not fight with the color of the tub but to make it the focal point and, because my sink and toilet are both white, get tiles to tie the color of the tub to the white of the sink. She suggested a white field tile paired with a border or liner tile that is or has the color of the tub in the design. I think it not possible to find the exact color but if it was close enough it could work as a border or liner, especially if the border or liner was a decorative tile that included white.

    I was also considering going with a contrasting color like a blue but not sure what shade of blue. I am also not sure if a dark blue (like a navy) would make the small bathroom too dark or be overwhelming. Not sure but maybe someone with experience can guide me if I have to go in this direction. An almost white tile with the same hue as the color of the tub with white could also work? Or maybe there is are almost white field tiles that comes varied shades of the same color so that one of them might match the tub? Not really sure what is available but hoping to find something soon.

    PS - I have decided I am definitely NOT going to reglaze this tub white. The finish is too good. Bermuda Coral it is.





  • ptreckel
    10 days ago

    I agree with BeverlyFLADeziner. Keep the $$$ thing, the tile, simple. Nothing tricky with liners or “decorative” tile. White, or natural looking, as she suggests, above. Neutrals. If you want to add anything else in the way of color to the room…do it with a wallpaper that might include traces of your tub’s color. It is changeable. Remember…Simple=elegant. AND, the tub can be the star.

    H Briz thanked ptreckel
  • H Briz
    Original Author
    10 days ago

    THANK YOU SO MUCH!!! I am liking this. :)

  • H Briz
    Original Author
    10 days ago

    Beverly, can you send me a link to that tile above? I want to order a sample

  • RedRyder
    10 days ago

    I actually like the tub color with white and a pure navy, as you posted. And @Beverly FLADeziner nailed it, as she often does.

    Working with the color will make you happy. You will have a unique bathroom and money to invest in making it look cohesive. Start with floor tiles as Beverly posted, to see if the white that is there works with those floor ideas.

    Can you post more of your bathroom for us?

    H Briz thanked RedRyder
  • H Briz
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    Hi RedRyder - my bathroom is being demoed this weekend to restore the original layout with this new/old tub. I had the same neo-angle, cinderella tub in white with closets and a make-up vanity and my husband tore it all out 13 years ago to put in a huge tub where my closets had been and the configuration of cabinets where the tub was originally, was unusable - huge amount of wasted space and no place for my clothes. I had most of them in the garage. After fell (and he also fell) in his giant tub, he finally agreed to let me put the bathroom back like it was so that is what I am about to do. As soon as it is demoed, the framing for the closets restored and the tub in its spot, I will post a picture and continue to post the progress. I just put a deposit down for a local cabinet guy to make me another floating make up vanity like I had before and a new sink vanity today so I am on my way. :)

  • H Briz
    Original Author
    9 days ago

    HI Beverly - what kills me is my husband covered the entire bathroom in travertine, including the ceiling. He did a great job with the tile. And now that you are suggesting it could work with the tub color (though the tub color is more peach/coral/pink and that travertine is more beige with some rust tones so not sure if the tones wouldn't clash? The work on the ceiling kills me to tear out but I have no way of moving the recessed exhaust fans and canned lights for the new layout. It is so sad that he was so stubborn and that I didn't have the confidence to stop him at the time. But I had no experience remodeling at that time and thought he knew better and he refused to update the old bathroom unless he got his way. I begged him not to change the layout and to keep my closets and had he listened, we would have saved a fortune. He moved the plumbing and electrical and tore out solid wood original cabinets that only needed paint and original plaster walls for greenboard. And now I am going through all the trouble to put it back. Just kills me. My husband is so impractical that I had to fight tooth and nail just to get screens on the windows because he only cares how things look.

  • RedRyder
    9 days ago

    Your husband isn’t the only one who fights for his ideas, even if they’re not the best. It’s genetic….

  • PRO
    BeverlyFLADeziner
    9 days ago

    It's impossible on the computer to tell how your tub works with any of the tiles I suggested. The tiles posted are not actual travertine but porcelain tile. I know how very hard it is to work with travertine and the tiles are a bit easier because there can be a range of shades.


    You could use this beige and white patterned tile with solid tile in the bath.

    See below. The tile doesn't have to look like travertine.

    What about using a wood look porcelain tile in the bathroom?

    Don't get me started on DHs and interior design projects. It's the reason I am not married. Someone would have ended up passing on to that great interior design studio in the sky!


  • RedRyder
    9 days ago

    Geez, @Beverly FLADeziner, you made me spit my coffee with that last comment!

    The alternative is to marry someone who doesn’t care but appreciates that you are house obsessed. Second guy is completely unaware and without opinions, and grateful I care. He’s a keeper.

  • H Briz
    Original Author
    8 days ago

    I have been so busy getting ready for the demo today, which is still in progress. But I wanted to share some pictures of samples I got from a tile store yesterday. I plan to go to more next week. First, I am including my best attempt to show what the layout will be (not to scale but should give an idea and, after that, will show pictures of some of the tile samples I have so far. I am leaning towards keeping it simple for the tile by sticking to white and the same shade of coral as the tub and bringing navy or another color with wallpaper. But, I am not sure about the style of the tiles I have brought home - never been crazy about the painted tile look. I wish I could find the right shade of white tile with a border tile that had the color of the tub in it for the walls. And then the same shade of white tile in a smaller format for the floor with some of the same color mixed in, or if all white, also use a border with the tub color around the edges of the floor.


    One design question I need input on is if I should paint my vanity to match the tub so it looks more uniform and like all of this was on purpose. The vanity is right next to the tub and I am looking at a white quartz countertop material with a hint of the same color. OR, do you think I should make the vanity white? Not sure if adding more white to the paint color so it is exactly the same tone as the tub but just a lighter version of it would also be an idea? I am having trouble seeing this.


    I hope seeing the tub next to some of these samples might help everyone visualize the color that it is since it is different in real life.










  • H Briz
    Original Author
    8 days ago

    Hello everyone again - per above, I am going to the local kohler and floor decor stores tomorrow and will post what I find there. What is the thought on a tile in a color similar to the off white in the pictures above without any border at all to tie in the color of the tub for both the walls and floor? Just all the same and have only color from wall paper and the tub and the vanity - if it is a good idea to paint the vanity the same color as the tub? The paint girl at home depot was able to match the color exactly.

  • PRO
    BeverlyFLADeziner
    7 days ago

    So the tub is more caramel in color. You're probably also going to have white fixtures in the room, so a tile or scheme that has caramel and white should work in your room. Love the Star and Cross pattern.




    H Briz thanked BeverlyFLADeziner
  • H Briz
    Original Author
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Thank you so much Beverly! xxxxooooo PS - we got the tub moved into the room next to the bathroom this afternoon so I am going to take a picture of the tub tomorrow in the daylight, so you can see it is actually a coral. That is what has made this so hard because it doesn't show properly in pictures and I think the light in the garage made it even harder to see. I just took these with the light in the bedroom and it almost looks yellow now. - maddening. It does have a little caramel tone but it is actually more coral/ peach in person. Coral/peach with caramel.



  • PRO
    BeverlyFLADeziner
    7 days ago

    OK, so that's why it will be so necessary for you to have the samples next to the tub. I had one of these tubs in a house 30 years ago in WHITE surrounded by black tile. it was great for a shower.

  • Kevin Roe
    7 days ago

    Honestly you could just use spray paint. You might have to sand it some if the finish isn't smooth before you paint it. It's hard to mess up painting with a spray can of krylon, they have the screen in the can similar to car paint sprayers, you just want to do it evenly and I would just keep moving quickly and make multiple passes on each area. You can use double sided adhesive to stick it to the floor and then caulk the cracks in (and you want to push pretty hard when caulking it in there or smear some in the crack and then go over it with a nice fancy layer.


    I would use oil based polyurethane (polyurethane is pretty soft) to glaze it or well seal it after. Well it appears there's no shower, but you may want to put a grit texture on it, by taking a flat impression of the grit and then making another mold out of it, and then taking a mold of the part you molded, depending on what you'd use for the original impression. Then pour a thin layer of polyurethane (or epoxy if you like epoxy) in it and let it harden, then before the glaze of polyurethane dries you can set it in there, otherwise you may be able to heat it down with a heat gun on the edges. This can help you avoid slip and falls in the shower or getting in and out of the tub and you may not notice it while laying in the tub.

    You could use porcelain which isn't really that hard to spray or spread on there but it's pretty hard (as in the way it feels) and you would still want to seal it. For the drain it looks like it's a trip lever. Which the stopper is about the same size as the drain and blocks it off a little ways down the drain pipe where they intersect.


    When I say oil based I mean plant oil based as in the polyurethane, you don't want to use a petroleum based product unless you aren't worried about it or have to. Xylol and methanol or other petroleum oils cause or may cause hairloss or cancer.


    When cleaning avoid using products with actual bleach in it because it will eat away at the finish and ruin the tub. You also may want to avoid certain alcohols or solvents. It even eats away at porcelain, and then it scratches the back in the tub and hurts pretty badly. The paint or sealant should last forever if nothing eats away at it but it might oxidize. It's no big deal to reglaze a bath tub with polyurethane, it's pretty easy even to just roll on there, and you actually want to do this to the entire bathroom so moisture can't get in there. Zep cleaner is good and there's many non-corrosive cleaners that kill everything.


    There's many different color options as in paint. Sometimes we made tiles that were metal oxides or different bond types to change the color and then attached it to a stone atom (the atom of a stone when they're all completely pulled apart) then heated together. I liked glass tiles but they were slippery and they might look frosted if there's a texture on them.

  • Debbie Downer
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Spray paint what, the tub? We already had that conversation - see above.

    OP were you able to find any kind of number stamp on the tub - Ive been trying to locate color online - just to get a more accurate sense of what color it is exactly. Was not able to find any "bermuda coral." Which is not to say it doesnt exist,, just that I didnt find it. Your tub does look an awful lot like the fifth one down on this page The color pink in bathroom sinks, tubs and toilets - from 1927-1962 - Retro Renovation Is yours as pink as that? (Color is called Corallin).

    Due to the geometric art deco style of your tub I would stick to the more geometric retro patterns, avoid intricate and/or flowery which are more harmonious with early 1900s claw tubs. Your hex tile although somewhat floral is simple and geometric but still Id rule it out because the gray is too blue-gray (at least on my monitor) and you want to stick with only the colors in your chosen pallette, not introduce another color into the mix (ie the blue).

    H Briz thanked Debbie Downer
  • ptreckel
    7 days ago

    Your tub is STUNNING!!!!! WOW. So happy for you! This will be gorgeous when you are done. I agree that you should keep it simple. NOT trick it up with patterned flooring or liner tile, etc. White. A simple white tile on your shower wall. (I don’t understand your two feet of tile behind the toilet.). I would opt for hexagonal tile on your floor. Period appropriate to that stunning tub. I would also paint the vanity white. And then…start looking for patterned wallpaper that will pull out the color of your tub in tiny amounts (so that if it is slightly off, it won’t be as noticeable.). What a STAR fixture in beautiful condition. You ARE Cinderella!!!!

    H Briz thanked ptreckel
  • H Briz
    Original Author
    7 days ago

    Debbie - I am having the exact same feeling about the tile style. So far, the only tiles I have seen that have the same color as the tub don't feel right to me, no matter how beautiful they may be for another bathroom. My tub screams art deco, especially after I learned the the color, Bermuda Coral, was first out in the late 1920s. So, I am determined to find a retro tile look. The off white tile that is in the picture looks like white with the color of the tub bleeding through in a way. But not sure if stark white would be better or if stark white would be too much like a gas station restroom. (I have always associated plain, stark white tile with cheap bathrooms.) And I am not sure I don't need some variation to avoid that all the same gas station look. That is why I was hoping to find a border tile or liner - that is mostly white with just enough of the color of the tub to tie the white and coral together. ?? And if it had the same style as what they did in the 20's to the 50's, it would respect the heritage of the tub. Oh, how I wish I could see how each choice would look ahead of time because so hard to know.


    Ptreckel - thank you so much! I will say we found some damage on the front of the tub that the ebay seller had hidden from view (they had it standing on the side with the damage) and I am hoping I can find a chip repair company that can do an expert job with the porc-a-fix Bermuda Coral so it is invisible or close to invisible. Because the rest of the finish on the tub is in very good shape and it would be impossible to find a finish like this on a new tub and the idea of getting a cheap looking coating that won't last long, seems so wrong. (I have 2 year old Kohler cast iron tub in the other bathroom that is already dull and not holding up.) I have also come to embrace the color. I hope I can find a pro that does this in Los Angeles. I have only found a place in Texas so far that specializes in this kind of thing.

    Regarding the 2", I am thinking of a low wainscoting (2' high) of the same shower tile on all the walls. I could go 4' high, too if that would look better? Not sure about any of this but my husband had a 2' high shower tile wall under his travertine tile on all the walls. It looked really good. But the whole look of the bathroom was so different that maybe I need to stick to the traditional height of wainscoting done during the time my tub was made. And I am going to do exactly as you say about the wallpaper and will be posting pictures of things I find as I go along for input. And painting the vanity white is the safe choice for sure. I am leaning towards it and the only reason I was thinking of painting the vanity the same as the tub (or a lighter shade of it?) was to somehow make the fact that my toilet and sink are white not so weird. Or maybe it won't be weird to have the tub different than everything else. Again, so hard for me to visualize. If I could see the choices side by side, I would know. But, my brain can't see in 3D like some. But, I do want to make the tub the start. I had this same tub in white for 30 years and loved it. And my husband took a sledge hammer to it and I have been sick over it ever since.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    H briz, have you been on Retro Renovation? supposedly they have colors from all of those old tile colors or places where you get matches.

    https://retrorenovation.com/2019/01/22/12-places-to-find-4-x-4-ceramic-bathroom-tile-in-vintage-colors/

    https://retrorenovation.com/2009/06/08/3-midcentury-bathrooms-with-large-square-cinderella-bathtubs/


    are you in an older spanish style home? art deco was very popular w/those.

    Although, these bathtubs debuted postwar, 1947

    is is Kohler? it says they made them in 7 colors plus white.


    Make sure you read this article regarding lead dust in these old tubs. They have some interesting info

    https://retrorenovation.com/2016/05/02/understanding-potential-lead-hazards-old-porcelain-enamel-bathtubs-sinks-ceramic-tile-any-age/

    VERY IMPORTANT:
    REMEMBER TO WORK LEAD-SAFE DURING INSTALLATION, MAINTENANCE, REPAIR AND RENOVATION OF ALL THESE PRODUCTS

    The CPSC also said that homeowners should be cautious before undertaking installation, maintenance, repair or renovation: “Dust from these products, if they are indeed found to contain lead, also could pose a lead dust hazard when removed, added or disturbed during home maintenance, remodeling or demolition.”

    H Briz thanked Beth H. :
  • H Briz
    Original Author
    7 days ago

    Hi Beth! Yes, I have been all over that site. To figure out the color, etc. So far all of the options that they led me to have no tile in Bermuda Coral. I went to one place in Gardena that is the #1 manufacturer of retro tile and they had no color to match. And the places that can match have long waits and very, very expensive. this is a real challenge and I fear will take me longer than expected. That is why I don't want to make mistakes - I want the effort to be worth it in the end.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Gotcha. it's a cool tub.

    Honestly If you want to stick w/the retro look I'd do the 4x4 wall tiles in white, or even a creamy subway, a modern wood vanity (or an mcm dresser modified to a vanity) a cool terrazzo countertop, some modern lights, maybe a mosaic tile floor (or do the terrazzo on the floors and a quartz countertop)

    All of that would be period appropriate.

    actually, I'm kind of digging the burnt orange penny tile. (since you see the color of the tub in person you could choose the correct tile color to coordinate)


    bring in a modified vanity in walnut or oak, white quartz, maybe a white terrazzo floor tile


    I do like this tile too. floor tile, tub surround tile w/the subway, maybe a terrazzo countertop. or you could use the decorative tiles behind the vanity, and do a terrazzo tile floor. even a black hex floor tile would work. CleTile, Fireclay tile, cement tiles,,,,all would work.



    for the tub surround you could do a simple white 4x4 or the stacked layout w/something like this.


    (check out Bedrosians Makoto line. they have the matte tiles in beige, a black, a white,,,,any of those would work

    black would work too


    unless you want to go completely retro w/your design

    were you going to do shower/tub combo?




    if you live in the spanish style, go w/the art deco


  • RedRyder
    7 days ago

    Once you said Art Deco my mind went to using more black and white to mimic that era. A friend who has a 1923 home just redid her master bathroom in Art Deco black and white (with a navy vanity) and it’s gorgeous. What about putting a white tile on the floor with a black border? Or black and white?

    Then the vanity can be white and accessories can bring in the coral of the bathtub.

  • RedRyder
    7 days ago

    Some b&w inspiration. I can see your bathtub in any of these.

  • RedRyder
    7 days ago

    More black and white tile floors

  • RedRyder
    7 days ago

    Last ones:

  • ptreckel
    7 days ago

    So…if you want to go retro, check out the Kohler line of Kathryn console sinks that are NOT in vanities, but are free standing on metal legs. AWESOME. Yes, I have a home built in 1939. Replaced a cracked free standing sink with a Kathryn. LOVE. IT. But…I would first choose my toilet and sink. Then….try and match that as your white. And if you are looking for a period style faucet, check out Kohler Pinstripe. I have it, but without the stripes. (You can get it plain.) Perfection. Seriously.

    H Briz thanked ptreckel
  • H Briz
    Original Author
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    RedRyder - Wow the black and white art deco look. especially in the pictures towards the bottom, are absolutely gorgeous. Do you have a picture of your friends bathroom where she did something similar with the navy vanity? I can’t picture how that would look and I’m very curious to see it in case that’s the direction I want to go.

    Also I forgot to answer Beth‘s question about my house. My house is not a Spanish but more of a mid century ranch I think but I’m not really sure what to label it as. But I know it’s not Spanish because I know those homes and what you’re talking about. They have a lot of those old mansions in Hancock Park California with that look and it’s gorgeous. But my house is just a regular traditional style. And my front bathroom did have that Mamie Eisenhower powder blue and pink tile in it originally.

    PS - I posted this same comment yesterday from my iphone when I was out and didn't know I was logged into my husband's account. So, deleted it from his account and redoing it here so RedRyder and Beth don't miss it.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    6 days ago

    H, I'm very familiar w/that area. they have some gorgeous homes all around there mixed in w/the standard ranch styles.

    Up to you what design style you want to go with!

    H Briz thanked Beth H. :
  • RedRyder
    5 days ago

    I don’t have a photo of her bathroom but can ask.

  • lisedv
    4 days ago
    last modified: 4 days ago

    Years ago I had the family bathroom tub reglazed and it was still nice after 10 years when we sold the house. And, the techniques and products have probably improved since then. Once the tub is painted white your options are open to any colour scheme and style you want. Here is one of many...