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High fiber diet - how to use dried fruits effectively

Lars
last month

Kevin is getting out of the hospital today, and he told me that he needs a high fiber diet in order to avoid future complications. He was already supposed to be on this diet anyway.

I had bought some dried figs for him, but he told me that fresh fruit was better. However, it is easier to store dried fruit, and we already have quite a bit of it. He thinks the dried fruit does not work as well as fresh fruit, and so I told him that I could rehydrate it for him.

Do you think this will make any difference?

Currently we have quite a few dried apples, dried figs, dates, dried plucots (which were rather expensive), and perhaps some prune.

What suggestions do you have for using these dried fruits so that the fiber will be best used?

I suggested making smoothies with yogurt, and Kevin thinks this is a good idea, but that is only one idea.

We have some steel cut oats, and I cook those with apples, dates, and date crystals, general for a breakfast meal.

Anyone have lunch or dinner ideas for high fiber.

I made grits yesterday, and I added 3/4 cup frozen corn (more than I usually do) as well a chopped red bell pepper, dried bell pepper, fresh ripe jalapeño, and celery, along with the other ingredients, such as chicken broth, garlic, sausage, eggs, and cheese. It seems like there is a fair amount of fiber in this, but I'm not sure.

I'm leaving in 15 minutes to pick him up, but I will check back later for responses.

Thanks!

Comments (51)

  • Fun2BHere
    last month

    Does he need a diet high in soluble fiber or insoluble fiber or does it matter?

    Lars thanked Fun2BHere
  • Lindsey_CA
    last month

    I just did a Google search on "is the fiber in fresh fruits better than the fiber in dried fruits?" These are two of the first three results:



    Lars thanked Lindsey_CA
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  • heatheron40
    last month

    I slip in flax whenever I can! I put a table spoon in his steel cut oats along with fresh or dried fruit.. Spaghetti sauce can have flax as does the Meatballs. I find the trick is a fruit and a veggie at every meal, except breakfast, just fruit. Think about frozen fruit too ;^) After dinner we eat tart frozen cherries with a dot of whipped cream.


    All the

    Lars thanked heatheron40
  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month

    Make bran muffins with the dried fruit stirred in...those will keep him going, especially if the dried fruit is prunes!!

    Lars thanked Annie Deighnaugh
  • Lucille
    last month

    Lars it seems that you shop quite a bit. I'm with Zalco, the best fiber is the fiber he eats. Start him out with fresh fruit, and then add some dried fruit dishes as you go along. I am a big fan of beans and legumes. I make soup with red dal lentils frequently. Unlike fruits, beans and lentils are less glycemic, a consideration for me.

    Lars thanked Lucille
  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month

    And of course there's always psyllium fiber... we bought that as it has no artificial sweeteners or flavors in it.

    Lars thanked Annie Deighnaugh
  • Lars
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    He already takes psyllium fiber - I'm not sure how much benefit he gets from it.

    He says that he gets better effects from fresh fruit than dried, and since fresh fruit is abundantly in season now, I will buy some of that. He says that one fresh plucot a day is enough, but for some reason he does not get the same benefit from a dried plucot.

    I was wondering if there were some way to may dried fruit more helpful.

    Maybe I will buy some bran to make bran muffins and put some fruit in those - possibly some of the dried figs. I really need to avoid prunes, as I have the opposite problem that he has.

    I was disappointed with the dried figs that I bought - they were a bit tart and nothing like the fresh figs that I used to grow. I really miss my fig trees, but I don't have room for them here.

    I'll have to check to see if any of the white sapote fruits are getting ripe. We got tons of those last year.

    We already eat lots of beans and lentils, but I did eat the last of the lentil soup that I had made while he was in the hospital. Of course I can make more, but I like to put fresh tomatoes from the farmers' market in it, and I did not go this week.

    I think frozen fruit sounds like a good idea, and I will use that idea in the future, when there are not so many fruits in season.

    I might buy a watermelon, although I'm not that fond of them - mainly because they are messy. If I had more freezer space, I would buy honeydew and cantaloupe and freeze those in cubes. I like to make instant sorbet with frozen cubes of melons.

  • maddielee
    last month

    ^ after my DH started one a day psyllium fiber drink (Sugar free Metamucil- Target brand) he has not had another diverticulitis flare-up. After years of having many.

    Lars thanked maddielee
  • Eileen
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Prune juice is effective. Last year I had a tooth pulled and was on a soft diet, which is not good for your bowels. I got so stopped up I called my doctor for advice. Her assistant told me that prune juice sends sorbitol to the bowel, which acts as a laxative and softener.

    Here's a recipe from Johns Hopkins. You could probably sub in rehydrated dried fruit for the applesauce.

    https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns_hopkins_bayview/_docs/medical_services/gynecology_obstetrics/bowel_regularity.pdf

    Lars thanked Eileen
  • Lars
    Original Author
    last month

    Kevin does drink prune juice, and so perhaps we should stock up on that again. I don't think he has bought any recently. I need to make more room in the refrigerator for juices. I like blueberry juice.

    I found this recipe using dried figs at the Recipe Exchange Forum. This looks like something I would like to make.

  • patriciae_gw
    last month

    Add more fiber slowly. Do it all at once and there can be some unpleasant consequences(cramps, abdominal pains)

    Dried fruit is equivalent to fresh but it is dry. You poach your dried fruit to rehydrate it. The tradition is poached prunes when people get old. Plums have lots of fiber but no better than any other.

    Juice is not equivalent to fresh fruit. Pureed fruit is so smoothies are better. Juice has the fiber removed. So rehydrate the dried and puree it and take advantage of all the dried fruit you have.

    This is obviously going to be a life long change so it will necessitate a change in buying and cooking habits.

    Grains and beans are excellent sources of fiber in addition to fruit. but go slow....

    Lars thanked patriciae_gw
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    zalco has several good ideas. A jolt of fiber once a day, whether it's dried fruit or Metamucil, can't be nearly as healthy a practice as a balanced diet that is mindful of the need for eating perhaps extra amounts of fiber rich foods through the day. .

    I've just read there can be several causes of diverticulitis. For some, it can be a consequence of many things including smoking, a diet lacking fiber, not drinking enough water, obesity or from leading a sedentary life with not enough activity.

    I can imagine that with lars' brother recovering from anesthesia and a hernia operation, the doctor probably wants to avoid him getting constipated and having to "push".

    Good luck to all, digestive system issues can be serious and are no fun.

    Lars thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • nicole___
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Blackberries: 10.2 grams of carbs, 5.3 of which are fiber.

    Strawberries: 7.7 grams of carbs, 2.0 of which are fiber.

    Blueberries: 14.5 grams of carbs, 2.4 of which are fiber.Apr 24, 2019

    I buy lots of frozen berries, top them with plain yogurt. Sprinkle with Wheat germ.

    For dinner, eggplant lasagna. Or...grain pasta.

    Lars thanked nicole___
  • morz8 - Washington Coast
    last month

    Lars - I can relate. I had outpatient surgery for a femoral hernia 7-2. With the anesthetic and a bit of pain meds, can I suggest a mild stool softener for your brother these first few days at home. Elmer is right, your brother does not want to push and will still want to place a hand or small pillow across his incision site if he does.....;0)

    I like Benefiber. My mothers doctor has prescribed it for her for diverticulitis. Not full doses but little bits added to things if enough fiber doesn't appear to be taking place in that days food. Costco has their own identical product priced much better...however, I think I've read you don't like Costco.

    Please don't miss the benefits of berries, many types.

    And he may not want to up his fiber all at once. A more gradual introduction, consistent and working up to higher amounts will cause less temporary distress.

    I hope he's feeling well soon. I'm sure you'll be glad to have him home!


    Lars thanked morz8 - Washington Coast
  • nickel_kg
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Years ago my doctor recommended I increase my fiber. I eat one of these for breakfast just about every morning, calling them my "morning muffns" -- lol.

    Morning Glory Muffins

    (adapted from Cooking Light)

    1 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour

    1 cup regular oats

    3/4 cup brown sugar

    1/4 cup ground flax seed

    2 teaspoons baking soda

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    3/4 cup chopped prunes

    3/4 cup cranberries* (can be frozen)

    3/4 cup chopped walnuts (I used pecans)

    1 cup mashed ripe banana (about 2 large or 3 small)

    1 large egg

    1 cup yogurt

    Preheat oven to 350°. Place 18 muffin cup liners in muffin cups and spray lightly with cooking spray.

    Mix the dry ingredients in a large bowl. Chop the prunes and nuts, add to dry mix. Add the 2nd fruit* (I like cranberries but sometimes use raisins, craisins, diced dates, diced dried apricot, dried pineapple, dried mango, either in place of cranberries or in addition to them.) Mix well.

    In a 2-cup measuring jar, mash the bananas then add and mix the egg. Add yogurt to measure the full 2 cups. Combine well, and add this mixture to the flour mixture. Stir until combined. Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups.

Bake at 350° for 20-25 minutes or until muffins spring back when touched lightly in center. Remove muffins from pans immediately and cool on a wire rack.

    note: these freeze well, defrost for one minute in microwave.

    Lars good luck to your brother. I bet he will be glad to be home!

    Lars thanked nickel_kg
  • OutsidePlaying
    last month

    All good suggestions on the fresh fruit, especially since there is so much in season now with melons, peaches, figs and strawberries. Dont forget avocados which are excellent sources of fiber and also good fatty oils which are good to keep the digestive system moving smoothly naturally. I like to chop up a half and add to a salad, or eat with a sliced fresh tomato, some fresh mozzarella if i have it, drizzled with olive oil and balsamic. Insalata Tricolore.

    I wouldnt eat too many berries initially in case there are IBS issues going on. And not too much fiber either for the same reason. A good balance can be reached.

    I had a friend who took a tablespoon of olive oil every day. It was a custom from her Italian mother.

    Lars thanked OutsidePlaying
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    "Last year I had a tooth pulled and was on a soft diet, which is not good for your bowels."

    I think there's some misunderstanding or misinformation behind this comment.

    A soft diet as directed by a dentist and increasing fiber as directed for digestive purposes by a physician are not in conflict and can be done at the same time. .

    A soft diet is to avoid chewing pressure on teeth or getting food pieces in surgical areas. A high fiber diet of the foods desired can also be a soft diet by simply running the food through a blender or food processor and drinking it. A smoothie containing fruit or veggie components has all the fiber the solid ingredients have and is the ultimate of a soft diet - no chewing required.

    Lars thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • duvetcover
    last month

    I think he was at Cedars Sinai Hospital? They give nutritional counseling. Might be helpful to consult with them? https://www.cedars-sinai.org/programs/nutrition-counseling.html

    Lars thanked duvetcover
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    Sure, it's a fine hospital, but I think all hospitals and docs (especially ones that do particular procedures repeatedly as a surgeon doing hernias would) give out standard handouts/ instructions and guidance for patients to follow after discharge, as would be appropriate for their specific conditions.

    Lars thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • satine100
    last month

    With diverticulitis you need to be aware of seeds which can induce a bout. Hope Kevin rests comfortably and Im sure you will be glad to have him at home with you.

    Lars thanked satine100
  • jane__ny
    last month

    I have a relative who had a bout with diverticulitis. He swears by Activia Yogurt. He said it moves everything along without problems. He is not a fan of bran. Was told after surgery that he was to avoid fruit with seeds. So he ate a lot of watermelon, peaches, etc. But said when he tried Activia Yogurt, it solved the problem.


    Jane

    Lars thanked jane__ny
  • patriciae_gw
    last month

    Most of what comes out your other end is bacterial. That has to be fed. Fiber is obviously a good thing to feed your bacteria. Eat a balanced diet. Keep fatty food to a minimum. Lots of vegetables and fruit will help. Dont ignore your proteins though. That is what you zero in on. Your gut bacteria is happy with what????? Make your gut bacteria happy.

    Lars thanked patriciae_gw
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I'm not sure and haven't checked but I thought water and undigested fiber together were the majority of it? Why fiber and drinking water are so important.

    I also don't think gut bacteria needs to be reestablished regularly but for when having taken antibiotics or other limited times. Doesn't it sustain itself, isn't that why yogurt and/or probiotics are suggested for a short time, and only a short time, during and afterward antibiotics or problems, to give the bacteria a running start?

    I also thought a portion of the bacteria came from spoilage and bacterial breakdown of what's been eaten. Is that not true?

    Lars thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • morz8 - Washington Coast
    last month

    Satine, more recent studies have many gastroenterologists saying things with seeds are fine. Just within the last few years. It used to be things like popcorn, cherry tomatoes, strawberries, blackberries were off limits but not so much now. Maybe during a flareup when a temporary low fiber diet might help for a short period time. (and no, I'm not a doctor or nurse and now have care staff to provide high calorie, high fiber for my mom)


    Lars, I find a lot of places to slip dried fruits into foods. Chopped finely into salads (cranberries, cherries, apricots), same with rice (then go ahead with my same savory dressings and seasonings). I snack on them whole. I don't have a mans sized appetite and am more likely to have a snack of 4-5 dried apricots than 4-5 piece of fresh fruit. It will be more about what Kevin's tastes are and what he prefers.


    The two of you don't have to figure it out all at once. I would imagine if you do most of the cooking you are feeling pressured to get it right for him. I promise, you'll be able to work the fiber into menus without undue effort. Just do your thoughtful best and enjoy that he's home.

    Lars thanked morz8 - Washington Coast
  • Lars
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Is diverticulitis the same as a hernia?

    Kevin had colon cancer about three years ago now, and he now has an ostomy, which pretty much changed his life. Mine has changed also, to adapt to his changes. The hernia that he had this year is related to this situation, but I don't understand it completely. He does have problems with constipation, and that's about as much as I know about what he is going through now. He had surgery to repair the hernia, and he is now on pain killers and probably will be on them for the next few days. He told me that he feels pain from where he had the surgery. I guess it is good that they kept him in the hospital as long as they did. Since the pain killers he is taking are opioid, they could contribute to constipation, and he will be switching to Tylenol or Ibuprofen as soon as he can handle the pain. He also has some medical cannabis, and I think that would be safer than opioids, if it will work.

    I'm not sure when he will be able to work again, but he told me that he cannot work from home when he is on opioids, and he has the time off from work. I was hoping that he would be able to go to Cathedral City with me next week-end, but he told me that he is going to have to return to the hospital for follow-up visits. I have to go to the desert in order to keep my orthodontist appointment a week from next Thursday, and I might have to stay there for a couple of weeks for my own follow up visit, but I can easily go back and forth. I would rather stay in one place for a week or two at least, but I can limit myself to a three day trip, if necessary.

    For now, Kevin is not able to make much of his own food, but I can make it easy for him. He won't be able to drive to a store for another week or so, but I think that by next week, he should be back on his feet. This reminds me of when I had my appendectomy, and I was told not to drive for two weeks.

    Kevin has not seen a dietician at Cedars-Sinai, but I have seen them at UCLA Medical Center. I will check to see what information the hospital has given him upon release, but I think it will be rather generic, as Elmer suggested. I think at this point that Kevin knows what he should be eating, and so I'll go by his requests.

    I'll look into flax seed. I don't have any at the moment, and if I do use them, I'll have to grind them up because Kevin does not like whole seeds. I have three jars of sauerkraut that I made, and Kevin said that that would be good, but it does have a small amount of whole caraway seeds, not to mention a small amount of whole mustard seeds. I think that since they have been in liquid for such a time, they should be sufficiently softened.

  • Islay Corbel
    last month

    I'd make compote from your dried fruit. You can vary the spices - principle fruits to vary the flavours. Lovely for breakfast or dessert.

    https://www.thespruceeats.com/dried-fruit-compote-2122158

    Lars thanked Islay Corbel
  • wednesday morning
    last month

    Lars, your brother has a more complicated situation than just needing fiber, apparently.

    A good all around diet of whole grains and produce should be sufficient for most people. One problem is that many dont have a good solid diet and eat a lot of processed foods.

    Dried fruits, fresh produce, grain muffins...........its all good.

    Good luck to him and to you.

    I wonder if there is such a thing as too much fiber for someone with a compromised digestive tract. His needs might be quite differnet than a normal functioning tract.

    Lars thanked wednesday morning
  • nickel_kg
    last month

    I wonder if there is such a thing as too much fiber for someone with a compromised digestive tract. His needs might be quite different than a normal functioning tract.

    wednesdaymorning, I think you are correct. My mom needed to avoid certain foods when she had her ostomy, things like coconut would literally clog her up. Generic healthy diet advice didn't apply.

    Lars thanked nickel_kg
  • Annie Deighnaugh
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Re your original question, Lars, I don't think hydration/dehydration makes any difference in fiber content. It really just is adding/subtracting water which contains no fiber. The difference with dried fruit is that it is higher in sugar as the sugars get concentrated. People are more likely to eat less fruit (sugar/calories) if they are hydrated than if they are not as that water is more filling. What seems to make a difference is if the fruit is broken down in any way such as being blended in a smoothie. For example, in WW, fresh fruit is zero points, but fruit in a smoothie has points.


    Drinking enough water is key for not getting constipated. So in that sense, dehydrated fruits don't add water to one's diet vs. fresh fruits that do, so that may be part of it too. But making sure he's drinking lots of water is essential.


    The thing to do is to work fiber into everything you can. So whole wheat breads instead of white, brown rice instead of white, high fiber cereals like Kashi instead of bland ones special k or rice krispies, multi grain crackers instead of plain. Look at nutrition labels though as there are "multi-grain" things that have little dietary fiber...it's all marketing. For wheat, it must say "whole wheat" as that's what has the bran on it...stone ground wheat or other nice marketing words don't mean anything. Any baked goods with flour can be replace with 1/2 whole wheat flour with no other changes needed for additional fiber. I sprinkle a tsp of ground flax meal on my salad every day and it sort of disappears into the salad so I don't even notice eating it.

    Re putting prunes in muffins, remember you can make a batch of muffins and split it in half or thirds or whatever and stir different fruits into each, so maybe prunes for him and raisins for you....

    Lars thanked Annie Deighnaugh
  • honibaker
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Hope Kevin is feeling better today.

    Re: Flax...it is sold "ground" in a bag, which I add to oatmeal and smoothies. I keep it in the fridge.

    It is also a good source of protein and Omega-3 fatty acids.

    Lars thanked honibaker
  • OutsidePlaying
    last month

    Lars, I am sorry Kevin has been going through so many issues. It sounds like he still has some difficulties tomovercome as he recovers in the next few weeks at home.

    Besides the after effects of anesthetics, being on opiods can slow down the colon, so yes, he needs to employ stool softeners and eat as many fresh fruits and vegetables as possible to keep his digestive system active. Yogurt is another good idea to keep on hand. I would again advise staying away from seedy fruit like raspberries and blackberries or nuts and coarse grains unless you can prepare smoothies and ensure they are thoroughly ground up. Ground flax as shown above can be good. But his entire diet doesnt have to be liquid, as there are lots of choices for foods, especially fruits and veggies. Sweet potatoes are great, and even a regular baked potato isnt all bad.

    Lars thanked OutsidePlaying
  • ci_lantro
    last month

    I like to add dried cranberries to leaf green salads and also to chicken salad.

    If I could eat bread, I would make a hearty, whole wheat type bread & add chopped dates & sunflower seeds.

    Lars thanked ci_lantro
  • Eileen
    last month

    Two Shredded Wheat biscuits every morning is all I need. There's no added sugar or fat like there is in muffins and fruit.

    Lars thanked Eileen
  • morz8 - Washington Coast
    last month

    Oh Lars, Kevin's condition is more complicated than I'd realized. My mother was diagnosed with diverticulosis, which I understand is a pre-diverticulitus condition. Improving her diet and adding fiber has mostly resolved it.

    With my own femoral hernia, I have no idea where it came from, I only discovered it in the shower one morning. It began causing enough intermittent pain after a few months that I needed to have it taken care of. I thought (being something of a tough guy/gal) that I'd be fine in 2 or three days. I was still icing and resting at the end of a week.

    I do have some residual discomfort at incision site at one month, but its tylenol worthy.

    Surgeon says hypersensitive nerves at incision area (hyperesthesia) that should go away in about 3 months.

    I know its still covid odd times, but am wondering if you and Kevin could keep an appointment with a nutritionist in his health care group. Even a zoom appointment could be helpful. Someone with more knowledge could give you pointers to the right direction of a better way for him to eat. I sincerely wish him the best and hope he's feeling better soon. And, I still think a mild stool softener would be appropriate while he's on prescription pain meds, but that information really should be in his discharge papers from the hospital and specific to his needs.

    Lars thanked morz8 - Washington Coast
  • beesneeds
    last month

    I think there's something to be said for fresh fruit or dried+water for fiber. Soluable and insolubale fiber needs water to work in the system properly. Fresh fruit already has that water addition to its fiber, dried fruit has had it removed. So it might be easier for some folks to do fresh over dried depending on their water intatke. If you stew or fully rehydrate dried fruit, or drink water along with eating the dried fruit, that helps balance out the water needs for the fiber to work properly.

    Oatmeal is great fiber, and good for more than just breakfast. Savory oatmeal dishes are great- there was a thread here recently about doing savory oatmeal.

    Lars thanked beesneeds
  • Lars
    Original Author
    last month

    Shredded wheat sounds good. I liked that as a child, but I think I had it with milk, and we never buy milk, although we do keep powdered milk on hand, which I use in pancake batter.

    I bake most of our bread, and I make whole wheat bread that is almost 100% whole wheat. I do add some vital wheat gluten to it, but no white flour. Here's what it looks like:

    You can see that it is not overly dense, and so it is good for sandwiches or for having with omelets.

    For pizzas, I use half whole wheat and half white flour, but I think I could possibly change the proportions. However, I mainly make pizza in Cathedral City, and Kevin won't be able to go there for a while. For one thing, he cannot go in the pool at this time and has to take sponge baths. He is also not supposed to take showers, and that's all we have in CC. I think he could use his handheld shower there to take sponge baths, but he does not want to travel at this time, and he said it might be two or three months before he will be able to.

    He has a follow-up appointment with his surgeon on Aug 13 at Cedars-Sinai, but I have an appointment with my orthodontist in Desert Hot Springs on Aug 13, and so I have to go back to Cathedral City for that. I also will probably have to stay there for a couple of weeks in order to get my crown. I told Kevin I could change my dentist appointment, but he said that would not be necessary. He also said that he feels better today. He's probably just happy to be out of the hospital, as they were waking him up in the middle of the night to take blood pressure, etc. He did say that his blood pressure was better (i.e. normal) while in the hospital, and he attributes that to not having to work, as he has a very stressful job.

    The worst thing that has happened to Kevin was when he was seven years old, and his jacket caught on fire when he was at school with the teacher away from the classroom gossiping with other teachers. Kevin got too close to the open flame heat in the classroom, and the jacket was extremely flammable. He lost the tips of his fingers on his right hand frantically trying to upzip the jacket. He had never been taught to fall to the ground and roll to put out a fire. He almost died from this incident and received third degree burns over much of his body, especially his back, where he had massive skin grafts. I was away at university when this happened to him.

    I will suggest to Kevin that he get diet advice from his ostomy support group. They should have some good information.

  • l pinkmountain
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I have IBS, and I learned that there's fiber and then there's fiber. "Sticky" soluble fiber like is in oatmeal and cooked fruits, is great for soothing the digestive tract. "Rough" fiber can irritate it. Wheat bran is rough fiber as are a lot of raw vegetables. Soaked ground flax seed I think is a litter softer. If I'm having any digestive tract problems, oatmeal is my "go to" food for helping it sort itself out. Luckily I love the stuff. There is also cream of wheat or cream of rice or cornmeal mush, but I much prefer oatmeal. I also love soaked and cooked dried fruit simmered with some whole spices and maybe an orange or lemon peel. The fiber doesn't go away in dried fruit, but it becomes the softer kind of fiber. https://www.ecowatch.com/foods-high-in-soluble-fiber-2645750556.html

    Lars thanked l pinkmountain
  • annie1992
    last month

    Oh, Lars, I'm just reading this. You've got lots of good advice about high fiber foods and meals for Kevin and I'm sure his ostomy support group will have a lot of good advice for him too.


    Tell him I'm sending strong thoughts for a quick recovery and I'll be thinking of you both. I know you will do everything to take care of him and help him when he needs it, so you should be sure to take care of yourself too.


    Hugs to both of you!


    Annie

    Lars thanked annie1992
  • Lars
    Original Author
    last month

    Thanks, Annie. I know you've also been busy lately with taking care of others.

    Kevin showed me the diet that he got from the hospital, and it said to avoid sweets (other than fruit), and so I will not be making anything with sugar. Kevin also told me that he does not like muffins, and so I won't be making those either. I'll ask him about whether rough fiber irritates him.

    The diet also says to limit fried food, but not eliminate it, and to limit fat intake. I made hummus last night, and I did put olive oil and toasted sesame oil in it, and so I guess it is not low fat. I think we'll eat it anyway.

    I'm going to TJ's this afternoon to get some pita bread and will make the falafel tomorrow. We can have the hummus today with some grilled chicken and salad. Kevin brought home leftover green salad and leftover fruit salad from the hospital.

    I'm going to make a cucumber salad also, mainly to have with the falafel.

    I'm hoping TJ's will have a good selection of fresh fruit. I know they have a good selection of juices, and so I'll ask Kevin if he wants any of those.

  • Zalco/bring back Sophie!
    last month

    If avoiding sugar is a goal, fruit juice should be avoided. That is lots of sugar with no fiber. Stick to whole fruit for best reults.

    Lars thanked Zalco/bring back Sophie!
  • Eileen
    last month

    Unfiltered apple juice should be okay. If you buy prune juice, look for the one that says "with pulp". It's almost like eating a piece of fruit.

    Lars thanked Eileen
  • Lars
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Not all fruit juice is equal - some have a higher glycemic index than others. I will, however, avoid recipes that have sugar in them. I think that refined sugar is more of a problem than complex sugars that are found in fruit juices.

    Kevin already has some prune juice, and he told me that he did not want any more fruit juice, even though I like them.

  • morz8 - Washington Coast
    last month

    Lars, if you are shopping and see a juice that appeals, I hope you'll buy it. You're going to need a treat or two yourself....remember to be good to you.

    Lars thanked morz8 - Washington Coast
  • ci_lantro
    last month

    After thinking about it a bit more, I would use some chopped dates & seeds (maybe) in Rusty's Oatmeal Bread recipe. (Our favorite homemade bread recipe.) Didn't immediately think of it since I try to keep homemade bread far from my mind! Here is the original recipe from Rusty:


    Rusty's Oatmeal Bread

    It comes from a very old Pillsbury cook book.

    The first amounts are as the recipe was published,
    The amounts in parenthesis after
    Are the amounts I use for 3 loaves.
    (9 1/2 X 5 loaf pans)

    Oatmeal Bread

    Ing:

    2 tsp salt (3 tsp)
    2 C boiling water (3 C)
    1 C rolled oats (1 1/2 C)*
    1 Tbsp shortening (1 1/2 Tbsp) (I use butter.)
    1 Cake compressed yeast (1 1/2 cakes)**
    1 tsp sugar (1 1/2 tsp)
    1/4 C lukewarm water (3/8 C)
    1/2 C brown sugar (3/4 C) (I use quite a lot less sugar: adjust to your preference.)
    *1/2 C lukewarm water (3/4 C)
    5 C flour (7 1/2 C)

    Directions:

    Add salt to boiling water.
    Stir in shortening and rolled oats.
    Let stand until lukewarm (about an hour).
    Crumble yeast in large bowl.
    Add white sugar and 1st amount lukewarm water.
    Let stand to 'proof' yeast.
    Dissolve brown sugar in 2nd amount lukewarm water.
    Add to yeast mixture.
    Stir in 1/2 of the flour.
    Beat until smooth.
    Add remaining flour and oats.
    Continue to beat until smooth.***
    Let rise in warm place until double in bulk.
    "Punch" down and knead by hand until smooth and elastic.
    Divide into 2 (or 3) loaves,
    Place in prepared pans.

    Bake at 425 for about 15 min.
    Reduce oven to 375
    And bake about 25 to 30 minutes.
    Until done.

    *I use only the old fashioned oats.
    ** yeast cakes are nowhere to be found around here,
    So I use active dry yeast.
    As per directions on the jar.
    2 1/4 tsp (3 3/8) tsp
    Or 1 packet (1 1/2 packets)
    *** I don't hand knead at all before the 1st rise,
    My K A does it all.

    I've found the amount of yeast for the 3 loaves
    doesn't have to be absolutely exact.
    The bread will be good, no matter.

    This is a soft, almost moist bread.
    Makes wonderful sandwiches, toast and french toast.
    I have also rolled the dough out
    after the first rise and dividing it,
    to about a half inch thickness,
    The width slightly shorter than the length of my pans,
    And lightly buttered it.
    Sprinkled with cinnamon & sugar
    and rolled up,
    Then placed in the pans.
    Raisins and/or nuts can be added here, too.


    Lars thanked ci_lantro
  • sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
    last month

    Sorry to hear this and that he is in pain. Hand in hand with the emotional stress during the healing process. If the medical mj does not help with the pain, it should aid in calming the stress?

    And yes, take care of yourself. He is lucky to have you as his main caregiver and you know your way around a kitchen to help solve the fiber issues.

    Sounds like you might need to print out some food group lists and go over what he likes and try to incorporate some hidden fiber. A smoothie might be the best way. Or a green juice smoothie combo. Took me a while to find a combo that DH likes. More veg than fruit, mostly berries. No banana, not too much like a milkshake, yada yada. Lots of ginger....and small. I think those jars are 6 oz. I make a dozen at a time and freeze. Make a few for me with cacao and cherries...my most recent freezer fruit.

    One of the MVPs of fiber is chia. Me loves a cacao chia oat milk pudding. DH not so much. Soaked chia, flax, hemp hearts, etc dried fruits, (i like dates), will blender smooth. Add his prune juice in a trial batch?. During lockdown i added a SwiissMuseli to my cart. Not had that since college. Really good and no added sugars in the original. Just a bit of dried fruit and some seed/nuts i think. Spice grinders are cheap for whole seeds and grains.

    I've never done the numbers but probably alot of fiber in my ball jars.

    Dito on support groups. Not usually a one-size-fits-all dealio. Some can't handle too much fiber. Some can't handle raw fruits and veg. A friend on an elimination diet has what she calls her 'digestive coach'. They discovered month three that raw was an issue. She does not cook at all. TJ's, WholeFoods and Sweetgreens. A year later she uses most on this list, HERE. Nothing in jars or shelf stable or spiced. The frozen grains and veg, dumplings.


    Lars thanked sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
  • Lars
    Original Author
    last month

    Thanks for the link to the Trader Joe's shopping list. I don't throw food nearly as much as she does, however, but I do already buy a lot of the things on her list, and quite a few I make myself rather than buy already prepared. This list does make me wish that my stand-up freezer had not died, but when I had it, I put way too much stuff in it and never seemed to get around to using all of it.

    I did shop at TJ's yesterday, and it was rather irritating. They had moved the nuts to where the bread used to be and vice versa, and so I asked someone who was stocking the shelves where the pita bread. I was already on the right aisle, and he said that the artisanal bread was all further down that aisle. I mentioned that it used to be by the front door, and he told me that it had been moved quite some time ago, in a rather surly tone of voice. I then went down the aisle to look for the pita and discovered that it was actually right in front of the person I had asked and was on the very bottom shelf, practically on the floor, which made it difficult to find. I was irritated that he didn't tell me that he was standing directly in front of it.

    Other people who were stocking items in the store pushed carts in front of me, forcing me to get out of their way instead of going around me, which they could have easily done. It was like they were annoyed that I was shopping there. I really need to shop at a different TJ's, as others are nicer, and there are quite a few that are reasonably close to me.

    I did buy some frozen mango plus some fresh plumcots. I don't know if these are the same as the pluots that we get at the farmers' markets, but they were in a hard, clear plastic container so that I could not tell how ripe they were. It turns out that they were nowhere near being ripe, but I guess that will be okay. They will probably be tart.

    I also bought some frozen corn that looked better than what I normally buy, but I did not have enough room in my freezer to buy any more frozen vegetables.

    I could not find any dried beans at TJ's, except for lentils, but they had a good selection of quinoa, and so I bought a small back of tri-color quinoa, since I have not had that type before. When I got home, I decided to order some dried fava beans from Amazon, and they seemed a bit expensive - $11 for a 20 oz bag. I'll wait to go to the Middle Eastern market to get more dried beans. I have the last of the garbanzos soaking for me to make falafel today, and so I need to get more of those. The Middle Eastern market by far has the best prices.

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Maybe not everywhere but it seems like each TJ's often have a unique vibe. I drive a bit farther to one I find more agreeable than the closer one. TJs employees often seem a bit in a huff and not always customer friendly, almost in a cultish way. It may be because of the type of people they hire. It's too bad.

    To my taste, pluots always seem to be plum-like, with a plum flavor at their base. Plumcots seem different, with an underlying but prominent apricot flavor

  • sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
    last month

    The friend i mentioned going through digestive elimination does not cook, Nada, hates it. Dislikes all things kitchen and i doubt will ever change. Odd that she joined our lockdown group recipe exchange early covid 2020. She purchased the 4 qrt Staub, and the baby grain pot when on deep sale. And a Vitamix last cyber day sale. Hates all. We do laugh about it and over the 4th of july i let her scan my pantry but did not want much. No way will she spice gring flax and soak chia. Or cook mixed grain and soak dry beans....fingers in ears, la la la-double la. I'm just a support system, not a trained nutritionist.

    We think it is spice and acids. Raw foods not pulverized. Processed foods.

    Chia pudding, a few blender combos, bone broth made from WholeFoods roast chicken not spiced, then stock with a few carrots, celery, marrow bones..my white miso recipe hot pot. TJ's frozen rice blends and frozen veg blends...as long as no spice is present. And cooked, not raw.

    If you have to go out of town....some easy TJ grains and veg might be an easy meal for Kevin. When i worked out of town many times, 15-20 years ago, Kashi frozens were my go-to. Lemongrass chicken....





    Lars thanked sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)
  • Lars
    Original Author
    last month

    I'll have to clear out the freezer again (not much in it this time, but it does have ice trays for when the ice dispenser takes a short vacation), and then I can make some things to freeze for Kevin. He'll have to tell me what he wants. I should probably freeze individual portions, and I'll have to use Ziplock freezer bags for that, to use space efficiently. I'll make some bean dip and some Spanish rice before I go, and he can make burritos using those. He'll have to do some shopping on his own, but I'll recommend that he go to TJ's to shop their frozen aisle.

    I think he's okay with cooking eggs, but there's not much else that he does cook. He won't cook for me (except BBQ) because he is afraid I won't like it, and he might be right. I guess I'm guilty of being too critical.

    I don't think he is going to want to go to fast food places, but he could go for take-out or maybe have some meals delivered. I think we have some things in cans that he can eat, like pozole, which we bought last Christmas. I'll sort through cans for him before I leave.

    He's perfectly capable of making sandwiches for himself, and he can go to the store and buy whatever cold cuts he wants. He can also get good sushi at Bristol Farms, but I do not trust him to cook fish - in the past he has overcooked it.

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