OT......question about England

yoyobon_gw

I've been enjoying the documentary on Amazon Prime done by Dave and Debra Rixon, UK filmmakers titled " The Original Footloose ---Along The Ridgeway" ( 1998).

What a gorgeous countryside and they are simply a delightful couple.

My question : Does England have deer ticks ? I watch them hiking along in shorts and short socks and get a feeling they are not concerned about ticks or Lyme disease as we are here in the US northeast.

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donnamira

I have no personal knowledge of the tick populations of the UK, but I did some internet searching. Lyme disease is carried only by Ixodes ticks; in the US, there are 2 types of Ixodes ticks that carry Lyme (one of which is the deer tick ixodes scapularis) with a range only in North America. Do All Ticks Carry Lyme Disease According to another site (European Tick Maps), there is one Ixodes tick species (ixodes ricinus) in the UK, although I have no idea if it also carries Lyme.



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reader_in_transit

According to WHO, Lyme has been found in other parts of the world, besides the USA. But in Europe it mentions only "central and eastern Europe":


https://www.who.int/ith/diseases/lyme/en/



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vee_new

I would have replied earlier but someone 'flagged' my OT thread about Covid and I was temporally caste out. As both the thread and I are back I can say that Lyme disease isn't made much of here, although probably it should be. I think there have mainly been outbreaks in some southern wooded areas (New Forest Hampshire etc) where deer roam. As the Footloose programme was made in the '90's possibly no-one was aware of it's significance.

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yoyobon_gw

Thanks Vee, and I think you might be correct because in 1998 few of us thought much about tick diseases unless we happened to actually live in Lyme Connecticut where it was first noted.

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Carolyn Newlen

My husband got it earlier than that when he went to help his oldest brother, who was ill, cut his grass for the last time and put his gardening tools away. This was in East Liverpool, Ohio, which is near the OH, PA, and WVA borders fairly near Cleveland.

DH thought he had bronchitis and went to the doctor who said there was too much infection for that to be the case. I've forgotten what meds the dr. gave him, along with a penicillin shot, but it worked and he didn't have after effects.

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Rosefolly

The standard treatment for Lyme disease is amoxicillin. I know this because I was bitten by a tick while traveling back East. When I checked with my doctor at home for a test, he told me that the test was't reliable and I should take the antibiotic anyway. (I never did have the test.) Well, I happen to be allergic to amoxicillin so I got something else instead.

The diagnostic bullseye rash sometimes happens, and sometimes it does not. You can't rely on it.

Here's an odd fact. California has Lyme disease but not so much. Our native deer ticks sometimes munch on the local western fence lizards. When they do, any Lyme disease in the tick is wiped out. The next time the tick bites an infected deer they are re-infected, but the net result overall is a lower level of Lyme disease in our tick population. On the other hand, the presence of the fence lizards elevates the tick population, so it's not all good.

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yoyobon_gw

In the book I am reading the author uses the word "kerb" where we say " curb" in the US. How did that become so different ?

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vee_new

We say 'kerb' for the dividing line between the pavement-edge and the road surface,

Our 'curb' means to restrain/check /control . . .ie "curb your temper" "curb the dog" with a leash/lead or a "curb rein" on a horse.

Wasn't much of US spelling 'altered' after Independence to emphasise/emphasize the US 'new-found freedom' . . . although spelling was still quite fluid back then?

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yoyobon_gw


Okay, I found this on a Grammar site :

In American and Canadian English, the noun meaning the edge of a sidewalk or roadway is spelled curb. In varieties of English from outside North America, the word is spelled kerb. But everyone uses curb for the verb meaning to check or restrain and for the verb’s corresponding noun (e.g., curbs on spending).

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yoyobon_gw

In the book I'm reading I noted many unusual expressions, here are a few:

- ....the book was in good nick

- " I saw her clock the piercings......"

- .....outside the off-licence building

-....sarky smile.... ( not snarky as we'd say , is it the same?)

- ....people who wind us up.

Are these standard British sayings or does the author come from some region where these expressions are common?

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vee_new

"good nick" just means in good condition

to 'clock' something means to see it (modern-ish slang)

"off-licence" is a shop/store licenced to sell alcohol although these days it is available at most supermarkets.

"sarky" means sarcastic . .. until very recently 'snarky' wasn't a word we were familiar with.

"people who wind us up" anyone who causes us/you/me to lose his/her/our tempers.

The language is rather slangy/sloppy but not in a 'regional' way. Those expressions could be used anywhere. Either the author is using his characters to talk down to the reader or the characters are meant be . .. how can I put it . . . street-wise, laddish?

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yoyobon_gw

You are right Vee, the main character who is telling us the story is a young woman who has had a rough life so she would use those street-wise expressions.

The character's name is Loveday which turns out to be Cornish.

Thank you for your explanations.

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yoyobon_gw

here's another expression that I found :

" she hared off to London " ?

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vee_new

"hared off" just means to hurry or rush. I suppose it originally came from the speed at which a hare moves.

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msmeow

In my book the men rode off to “harry” the Welsh. I wonder if it’s derived from the same word.

Donna

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donnamira

Good question, I looked it up and nope, different etymology. "Harry" comes from old English hergian, "to make predatory raids, ravage, make war." "To hare" as a verb does come from the speed of a hare, as Vee commented, and as a noun comes from Old English 'hara' which may ultimately descend from proto-german for 'gray.' (thanks to Google & Merriam-Webster)

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yoyobon_gw

In the book I'm reading she frequently writes that they "played a game of sardines" . At first I thought it might be hide and seek......any ideas?

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donnamira

The game Sardines readily comes up in an internet search - it's a reverse hide-and-seek, which begins with one person hidden. Everyone searches and as each one finds the hidden person, they join them in the hiding place, until everyone is squeezed in like sardines. Game of Sardines

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vee_new

Yes donnaira, 'sardines' apparently used to be enjoyed by older children (before teenagers were invented) and always played at birthday parties. An excuse to get up rather too close to the girl next door or maybe the good looking cousin you fancied from afar.

I can't see the modern young person enjoying those innocent pleasures. Now anyone up for 'pinning the tail on the donkey' or 'hunt the thimble'?

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titian1 10b Sydney

We used to play it at my school too, (which went from 5yo to 16 yo), on wet days.

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