How do I cook a rump roast?

Toby

I bought a 3 lb. rump roast from the butcher shop. I intended to buy my regular cross rib roast to pot roast but the butcher said the rump was more tender. He also said to pot roast it, but looking online, I see directions to roast it. How do you cook this cut of beef?

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gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)

Unless it is prime grade or better, low and slow is the way to go. This is a cut that is best braised and slow cooked for an extended period, otherwise it can be very tough and chewy.

Even if it were prime grade, I would be very reluctant to dry roast this cut. I really dislike tough beef!

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LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

1. Fill your toilet with boiling water

2. Have a seat

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chloebud

Agree with gardengal...low and slow.

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LoneJack Zn 6a, KC

Sorry about that...don't know what came over me.

I always just brown all sides in a skillet and then cook on low in a slow cooker for 6-8 hours with the veggies and spices of choice. Remove the meat and veggies. Strain drippings. Mix corn starch into cold water and stir into drippings. Stir until thickened. Enjoy!

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plllog

Pot roast is usually low and slow. Go ahead and make the pot roast.

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arkansas girl

Rump roast and tender do not go together...LOL! I'm curious as to what others will say because I've given up on Rump in favor of chuck roast which when cooked low and slow is fall apart. To be honest, I don't know what a "cross rib roast" is! Does it have another, more common name?

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Toby

That's what they call them here.

What cut of beef do they use for deli roast beef that is roasted rare?

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arkansas girl

I google searched for cross rib roast and apparently it is chuck roast. This is what I've been using because it has more fat so makes a fall apart roast when cooked in the slow cooker. I do not know what roast beef from the deli is (what cut of beef). Being sliced wafer thin though, it wouldn't be tough. It probably is a rump. All I know is that I haven't had much luck with the rump roast, I was talking about it with some ladies and they swayed me to use chuck instead. I am interested in how to fix a rump though because they are always on sale, I feel I'm missing out! :)

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gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)

Cross rib comes from the animal's shoulder (close to the chuck roast area).....rump roast comes from the top of the leg or rump. Both are very muscle-y and tough, unlike a rib roast or tenderloin. Both cuts can be very flavorful but need moisture and extended low heat to break down all that muscular tissue. When cooked properly, both are fall-apart tender as well.

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gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)

"What cut of beef do they use for deli roast beef that is roasted rare?"

Usually eye of round.

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bragu_DSM 5

chunk it in 2 inch pieces, and cook brown the pieces ... then low and slow in the IP, crock pot or oven ... 250 for three hours in the oven should do it ...


LJ, that is 6-day covid recipe ....

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seagrass_gw

I prefer chuck roast, but when DH sometimes brings home rump roast he cooks it in the pressure cooker, adding vegetables as time progresses.

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bbstx

For low and slow, I often make Pioneer Woman Italian Drip Beef. This link has two drip beef recipes. I most often use the one with Italian seasoning and pepperocini peppers (I buy the ones that are sliced, not whole). I have made both recipes and like the non-Italian one too.


And then there is Mississippi Roast. Here is the NYT recipe which foregoes all the packaged mixes.

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Toby

Correct, cross rib isn't chuck roast. I buy that too but not when it's extremely fatty.

Well, I browned it well and since it's too tall for my covered skillet with a domed lid, I transferred it to a baking dish with beef broth and sauteed onions and garlic and into a 300 degree oven. If not tender in three hours, we'll be eating leftovers tonight.

If you wanted to make a rare roast beef, would you use eye of round? I know prime rib is the best but I only buy that around Christmas when there's plenty available and good prices.

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Sherry

Toby, I have cut a roast in half to reduce the height if it is too tall. Tastes the same and cooks quicker.

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Toby

I did do that the last time I bought a rolled cross rib roast from them but I forgot this time. I thought I might cut some of it into stew meat but I'm not sure of tenderness. That sucker cost $8 a pound so I hope it's not a disaster. I don't go into grocery stores anymore but I still feel safe at a small butcher shop, but I pay the price for quality.

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gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)

If not prime rib, which would always be my first choice, then I'd go with a tenderloin. They are very lean and need minimal cooking time. But they are not well marbled (very little fat) and in my world, there is no reason to have a roast unless it produces enough drippings to make Yorkshire pudding!

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Toby

You sacrifice flavor for tenderness with a tenderloin too.

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olychick


I don't cook beef roasts any more because I live solo, but I used to cook rump roasts all the time as did my mom when I was growing up. Maybe current roasts aren't as tender, but this is exactly how we cook them and they are delicious.

https://www.food.com/recipe/perfect-rump-roast-294196



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chloebud

"If you wanted to make a rare roast beef, would you use eye of round?"

Toby, I'm not a big fan of eye of round. It's lean but can be tougher. If you try it, be sure to slice it thin for serving. You might try a top sirloin or sirloin tip roast. Still not the most tender but better than eye of round IMO. Have you ever roasted or grilled tri-tip? I'm a big fan of the flavor. Of course, there's always beef tenderloin which is pricey. However, most places will sell whatever size piece you need. To me, the tenderloin doesn't have as much flavor as other cuts. Nothing like a standing rib roast.

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Sherry

"That sucker cost $8 a pound so I hope it's not a disaster. "

It won't be a disaster, but it may take longer to get tender than you think. Been there. done that! Just put in frig in pan and start up again tomorrow.

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Toby

Oly, I looked at that recipe earlier, which prompted this thread. It looks well-marbled and it might have been okay to roast it.

I usually buy sirloin tip or cross rib, whichever looks better in the meat case. Sometimes they have a cross rib that tapers at the end and that seems to be a better roast.

I lived in Santa Maria CA for fifteen years, where tri tip originates and is grilled over oak wood in the classic Santa Maria barbecue. I still occasionally grill a tri tip or tri tip steaks.

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chloebud

I've lived in CA most of my life so I know the significance of Santa Maria and tri-tip. It's truly one of my favorite cuts for steaks, strips or roasts due to the flavor. For the most part, we always grill tri-tip after it's been marinated

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olychick

That's so interesting about tri-tip. My husband was from So.Cal and his parents relocated to Atascadero when they retired and his brother settled near Paso Robles with his wife and children. His brother would grill tri-tip when we visited but it wasn't ever seen in the PNW in those days. I see it in stores now that Trader Joe's has come to our area and lots of CA transplants living up here.

Word of caution: his brother died very young from colon cancer, likely attributed to all the grilled meat he ate.

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Toby

Yes, that's prime Santa Maria bbq territory, oly. I remember there was a steakhouse up that way, somewhere between San Luis Obispo and Atascadero, known for its Santa Maria bbq. You have to have pinquito beans to be authentic but those aren't found around here. WinCo and Fred Meyer sell tri tip though.

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chloebud

It seems tri-tip is much more available all over the country these days. I also think it might have been labeled differently in other parts of the country making it confusing. I've seen names like "California cut," "bottom sirloin," or "culotte." It's just the bottom tip of the sirloin cut in the triangular shape. I think "tri-tip" says it best.





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amylou321

Crock pot all day. Or low and slow in a dutch oven in the oven. Again, all day. I love rump roast cooked until it is falling apart and smothered in gravy made from its juices. Makes the best hot roast beef sandwiches.

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Sherry

My problem with oven roasts, is that they are better at medium rare. That is fine for me, I love beef if you just wave it over the heat a time or two, or not (tartare). Hubby insists on no pink. Zip, none, nada, no pink, so it is not good. I have diverted to only rib eyes. I can cook his well done and he likes it. Mine I can fix my way. Even New York Strip doesn't work. I have tried Prime Rib and it does not work for us.

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chloebud

"Makes the best hot roast beef sandwiches."

I agree. :-)

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bbstx

@Sherry, y’all sound like perfect candidates for sous vide cooking. You cook his steak to his desired degree of doneness. Then cool the water to what you like. When your steak is completed, you take both out of the water and sear them on the grill, in a cast iron skillet, or with a Searzall (which I pine for but have never bought). Sous vide cooking steaks has short-circuited all the “my steak is too rare/my steak is too done” arguments in our house!

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bbstx

You can definitely overcook a steak using the sous vide method. Here is a very good explanation of how to cook steaks sous vide.



This is Kenji’s photo. At one hour, you get a good chew. At four hours, it is a little less chewy. At 24 hours, it is mush.

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nandina

bbstx posted above the recipes for Pioneer Woman's Drip Beef. Both are outstanding recipes. Easy, delicious, freeze well. Flavorful....etc. Winners!

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Toby

I cooked my rump roast for about 3 hours at 300 degrees but wasn't sure if it was enough so I put it away and cooked it for another two hours at 275 yesterday. It was tender. It wasn't any different than the pot roast I buy for half the price at Kroger though. With shrinkage, I got as much meat from it for what I pay for a small rib roast. The butcher shop rump roast was $8 a pound and I get rib roast at the grocery store for $6 a pound.

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KatieC

We did a rump roast in the sous vide last weekend. I seasoned and seared it first and let it go 24 hours. Made beautiful French dips.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

I need a French dip in my life. I have a chunk of beef. Is that a typo in the 'pioneer' recipe?. It reads like it is cooked on the stovetop. But then it says if it is not quite done, place back in the oven for 1/2 hours increments....

I would use more onion. Might go with sousVide.

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Toby

I always brown my meat on all sides in a little oil, not butter, and then saute onion and garlic. I use a carton of beef broth to simmer it in. Yes, it can go in the oven as long as you bring the broth up to a boil first.

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annie1992

When I want rare roast beef for sandwiches like the stuff in the deli, my choice is sirloin tip, but I've been known to use eye of round. I have a small slicer and if I get those very thin slices, it's all tender.

I'm not a fan of pot roast because I like my beef rare. I used to make them for Mother, but now she says they are "too tough", even if they are falling apart and she especially dislikes the "strings" of chuck roast. The difference in rump and chuck is that I find chuck to be "stringy" more than rump roast. When I do make either, I put them in the crockpot with vegetables, cook them all day, then thicken the juices for gravy. I give the beef to the dog and eat the vegetables, LOL. Sometimes I make hot beef sandwiches, but Elery has decided that "carbs are evil", so he won't eat mashed potatoes or bread and he dislikes gravy. Mother also dislikes gravy, although she'll eat it if I call it "sauce". (grin) She'd starve before she'd eat mashed potatoes, so it's a big treat for me when I make those. She loves the vegetables in pot roast, though, and I can't figure out how to get the vegetables that way without the roast!

Annie



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Sherry

Annie1992, I can relate. My husband is going backwards every month. What he used to eat for fifty years, he does not touch. You might try cooking the pot roast vegetables in beef stock without the beef for your mother, lol. Just buy some soup bones.

Carbs are not bad unless like hubby, his food groups are cookies, candy, fried, and biscuits.

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annie1992

Sherry, I raise grassfed beef, so I have plenty of bones and I can my own homemade stock. "It's not the same" according to Mother and since I have a freezer full of beef all the time, Mother has decided she doesn't like beef. She has osteoporosis and her teeth are loose, so it's not like she can eat a big steak, but she will pick the last shred of beef out of a bowl of stew, LOL. She also picks all the beans out of chili but says it doesn't taste right unless they are in there.

I know carbs are not bad, and oddly enough Elery will eat popcorn, but won't eat potatoes. Mother used to love broccoli, now she won't touch it. I never know what either of them will eat from one day to the next, but I guarantee it won't be anything I actually like!

Annie


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WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

I cook rump roast or eye of round in the Instant Pot for rare roast beef. It slices beautifully and tastes great.

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