On Top of All This I Find Out I Can't Use Corningware in Toaster Oven?

ritaweeda

The other day I found out that you can't line the crumb tray with foil in a Breville toaster oven, it could cause a fire. Now I'm reading that you can't use corningware in a toaster oven. So, for baking things like baked beans (which is what I was going to do) what are we supposed to use?? This is aggravating.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

Do you have info on the max temperature that's safe for your Corningware that you planned on using? I imagine it wouldn't be too hard to find on the internet...

So I found this page @ corningware.com that states it's oven-safe up 350F:

https://www.corningware.com/support/frequently-asked-questions

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Sammy

What does your user guide say is safe? That’s your Bible. I have the Wolf countertop oven and I use pretty much anything that I would in a conventional oven, including: Pyrex (glass), ceramic/stoneware, steel, aluminum, etc. I haven’t used cast iron, but I think I could if I wanted to. In any event, your user guide will have the information you seek.

Btw, why would you want/feel the need to line the crumb tray with aluminum foil? It’s kind of redundant.

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ravencajun Zone 8b TX

I had to live for over a year using only my toaster oven and microwave in the motorhome. I bought all metal pans sized for toaster ovens. I think the problem with the corningware is that it is so much closer to the heating elements in the toaster oven than a regular oven.

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Toby

The crumb tray gets stained if you use it for baking.

I've been using Corningware in my Breville oven for seven years without a problem.

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Lars

I've been baking Corningware in the toaster oven at 360° for years with no problem, but my Corningware is vintage, and that may make a difference.

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chas045

So: where were you reading this? I suppose it might be true for modern Corning Ware made after 2000, but even then it is understood to work in 350°F ovens so I don't see where there would be a problem. With vintage Corning Ware, it can be used in ovens and directly on stove tops. I have heard of unusual failures. Is there something special about the broil part of a Breville; seems unlikely?

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ci_lantro

I use my vintage (pyroceram) Corningware in my vintage toaster oven all the time. Also a clear oval borosilicate glass roaster. No problems.


The new Corningware--the French White--is not the same material as the vintage stuff. I *think* it is just stoneware.

I bought a couple of 9 x 13 shallow (about 1" deep) heavyweight aluminum pans from the restaurant supply. Those work great in my oven; use them a lot. Most toaster ovens aren't large enough to use a 9 x 13 pan--smaller pans available at the restaurant supply. I have three ovens; one in use & 2 back-ups, all vintage & all large enough for a 9 x 13 pan.

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ritaweeda

I just looked at the user manual, Corningware should not be used. So does that meant that the only thing I can use is metal? I used to use the foil to line the crumb tray in my old Oster, I used corningware and pyrex baking dishes in it, no problems. So now I've actually read the info. and finding out the use is limited. Oh well, the baked beans are in the regular oven which I really didn't want to use for only one thing but that's the way it goes. BTW I don't cook in my crumb tray, I'm not that stupid.

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plllog

I think there may also be a shock problem. If you warm up your Corningware slowly, to at least warm to the touch, and use room temp ingredients, I think it would be less likely to break.

Remember, people are used to freezer to oven with their Corning. I don't do that, but I can see how the confines of a heated toaster oven could shock it.

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carolb_w_fl_coastal_9b

I'm very curious now. I looked at 1 manual for a Breville toaster oven and it says only make sure any ceramic or glassware is oven safe. What model is yours?

https://www.manualslib.com/brand/breville/oven.html

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bbstx

@Sammy, I use cast iron in Breville all the time. I’ve only had my Breville since Christmas, so I don’t have years of experience with it. The little skillet is handy for cornbread and other small amounts.


Gee, I didn’t know I couldn’t use Corningware in my toaster oven. I don’t know that I have, but I would have assumed it was okay. I’ve used my pizza stone, but when I realized it is just a shade too big and was holding the door open just a hair, I switched to the metal pizza pan that came with it.


I have also used Pyrex and Skyros Corricoware.


I find the crumb tray easy to clean, so I would never have thought to put foil on it.

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WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

I use my old CorningWare small skillets and saucepans in the toaster oven and the air fryer all the time. Use my old Pyrex too; also use the Pyrex in the instant pot. Never have had a problem.


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naturegirl_2007 5B SW Michigan

Corning Ware ads from the early days show one side of their Pyroceram pan frozen in ice, the other side being heated by a propane torch. The material is safe for ovens, stove top, microwave, and under the broiler. Toaster ovens should not be a problem.

However, the Corning Ware name is on items made of materials other than Pyroceram. The new French White is stoneware (older French White is pyroceram) Other casseroles were also produced after the company was sold in the 1990's that are not pyroceram. Recently some items are being made in pyroceram again. So it makes sense that the toaster oven manual would say not to use Corning Ware rather than try to explain the various kinds.

Some people think that Corelle, also made by Corning, is safe to use in extreme heat changes. It is not Pyroceram, and not suited for temperature extremes. It is okay in a regular preheated oven up to 350 degrees, but not in a toaster oven, stove top, or under a broiler. Pyrex bakeware, also made by Corning, does not have the thermal qualities of pyroceram either and should not be used in temperature extremes.


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WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

Thank you, naturegirl, for that very good information. I knew when I was looking at some French White yesterday there was a statement that it was stoneware; I knew the old French White I have is not stoneware. The old pyroceram was such a good material, don't know why they stopped using that. Probably greed.

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Toby

The antique stores around here have lots of vintage Corning Ware and at a good price.

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foodonastump

Glad I haven’t read the manual. Sounds limiting.

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lisa_fla

I just checked my manual( Oster toaster oven with pizza drawer). No mention of Corningware.

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Rose Pekelnicky

I have the Breville BOV845. The manual states "caution should be exercised when using pans and dishes constructed of materials other than metal. Ensure dishes are oven safe." I use Corningware casseroles in mine frequently.

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Compumom11

i've used foil, but not in the crumb tray. I used to line some smaller metal pans with foil, I've now mostly switched to parchment. I've been lucky finding smaller pans at Homegoods with no problem. I bake in au gratin dishes and probably have used some older Corningware, but cannot say for certain. I bought a small cast iron Lodge pan to cook fish and meat and use it quite often in the Breville. My Breville is 5 or 6 yrs old. LOVE IT! FYI I do use non stick Reynolds foil under English muffins when my husband wants melted cheese muffins. I put it under the muffin after they are cooked and want the cheese to melt. No problem either!


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ritaweeda

User manual for Breville says: "Caution should be exercised when using pans and dishes constructed of materials other than metal.

User manual for French White bakeware says: "Do not use on stovetop, under a broiler/griller, under a microwave browning element, in a toaster oven, etc."

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ci_lantro

Walnutcreek, I have several pieces of vintage Pyroceram CorningWare, too.



https://www.santafetradingpost.com/corning_ware_history.html

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WalnutCreek Zone 7b/8a

ritaweeda: 'User manual for French White bakeware says: "Do not use on stovetop, under a broiler/griller, under a microwave browning element, in a toaster oven, etc."'

That must be on the new French White, my old French White could be used on stovetop, under broiler, in toater oven, in microwave. So happy I have the old and better French White.

ci_lantro: What an interesting article. I loved reading it.

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plllog

I thought I had heard that there was new Corningware again. Sure enough, Amazon has it (if you want it in May). Limited sizes ayound colors, but an alternative if you want new. eBay has plenty of used, which is easier just now than thrift shops.

Apparently, someone bought the Corningware name but decided it was too expensive so stopped making the real thing, but they've brought it back.

https://barbaracasey.com/stovetop-safe-corningware-is-back/


You can tell the original stoneware from the fluted sides and weight. It had Pyred tops. The Pyroceram is much thinner and somewhat lighter, with smooth sides.

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Chessie

Hmmm. I have lined my toaster oven trays with foil for YEARS. All of them No worries or concerns about a fire ever. But no - I never line the crumb tray. Just take the thing out and clean it once in a while. I really don't see a need to line it anyway. And I have a Breville now, and use foil it in routinely. AND I use corningware dishes in it as well.

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Chessie

ritaweeda

I just looked at the user manual, Corningware should not be used. So does that meant that the only thing I can use is metal? I used to use the foil to line the crumb tray in my old Oster, I used corningware and pyrex baking dishes in it, no problems. So now I've actually read the info. and finding out the use is limited. Oh well, the baked beans are in the regular oven which I really didn't want to use for only one thing but that's the way it goes.


Corningware is FINE in your toaster oven. Seriously. I use it all the time.

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joann_fl

I line my toaster oven with foil & I use corning ware.


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ci_lantro

You can tell the original stoneware from the fluted sides and weight. It had Pyred tops. The Pyroceram is much thinner and somewhat lighter, with smooth sides.


It gets confusing because there was a line of plain white (Pyroceram) Corningware which I think preceded the French White. The vintage French White is Pyroceram & has the pretty fluted sides. The other plain white the same shapes as Cornflower, etc. No design & no fluting and it wasn't as pretty a white color as the French White.

It didn't last long; I hardly ever see any of it around at rummage sales.


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plllog

ETA: I just found it as a "vintage" listing on Amazon. The fluting isn't as pronounced and the dish in the picture does look like pyroceram.

I have the plain white Corningware, and so does my mother. She also has the fluted white stoneware from decades ago. It's definitely stoneware. I've never seen the pyroceram with the fluted sides.

Here's the one I found: https://www.amazon.com/Vintage-Corning-pattern-1-6-PYROCERAM/dp/B079N7VVR6

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ci_lantro

How to tell the difference between Pyroceram & stoneware French White Corningware...


http://www.corningware411.com/2012/12/avoiding-identity-theft-french-white.html

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Jasdip

I have a Cuisinart counter-top oven. I read the instructions and it says nothing about Corningware, but it does say not to use foil on the crumb tray. Only on the baking trays as needed.

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plllog

I had a memory about this at breakfast. My mother received a stoneware one as a gift and didn't like it. She said something negative about stoneware that stuck with me. About 10 years later I bought my first piece of Bunzlauer, a bread bowl sold by KA's catalog. That was before "Polish Pottery" became a craze. It's stoneware. I'm careful with it because it's so huge, but later I bought a couple of matching baking dishes, and they're nigh on indestructible. That seemed to contradict my mother's distaste. Now I understand that she wanted the pyroceram and was disappointed because stoneware is not that.

I might hesitate to put my bunzlauer in a countertop oven, mostly because of size ratio and being too close to the sides and all. I put it in the oven all the time, as well as Emile Henry and Le Creuset stoneware. Hm... I'd put my little Le Creuset bakers and pie dishes in a countertop oven, and I'd think the Corning must equal quality.

Y'know.... It must be a CYA thing. Some idiot put a full sized lidded casserole in a little oven and had a misadventure. Or challenged that frozen and flamed demo with a shock temperature. Or had a dish that had some kind of internal crack just waiting for an excuse to break. Pryoceram does break. Just not often. Or maybe it just stained badly. It's really hard to stain, but once you do, it's harder to unstain. So maybe if they got several such complaints about their ovens ruining Corningware, they just put a blanket ban on it so they can say it was in the manual and not their problem.

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bbstx

I just got out my 8x8 Pyrex (clear glass) dish to make sweet rolls. I noticed it said “Conventional oven only.” I’m assuming that means no toaster oven. Nevertheless, I’m hard-headed. I put it in my Breville countertop oven, just like I’ve done scads of times before. The rolls are now out of the oven and cooling. So far, so good.

I agree @plllog. It only takes a couple of lawsuits and suddenly things that were just fine to use become verboten.

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plllog

Actually, I think it probably means no microwave. :)

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bbstx

Oh, geez, don’t say that! It is my favorite sized dish for many things!

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Chessie

bbstx

I just got out my 8x8 Pyrex (clear glass) dish to make sweet rolls. I noticed it said “Conventional oven only.” I’m assuming that means no toaster oven. “


No. It means no microwave. You can absolutely use glass dishes Pyrex corning ware whatever, in a toaster oven. I don’t have any glass dishes that state that they cannot be used in a microwave though. That’s really odd. Unless there was metal in the glaze… Or unless it is a ceramic/pottery type of dish, I would use it in the microwave.

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plllog

My favorite Pyrex glass casserole broke in the microwave. I was especially upset because I had a same sized disliked one I could have used. I still do use Pyrex and Pyroceram in the microwave, but not anything irreplaceable. I did buy a replacement for my broken dish, but it's not exactly the same and it's fine, but not a favorite.

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Compumom11

I just found this on Amazon when I was looking for a replacement for my big oven liner LINER


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Chessie

You better check the reviews on that liner, someone ruined their Breville using it, I would never put that in my toaster oven.

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Rose Pekelnicky

I've been using a piece of that liner cut to fit the crumb tray in my Breville oven for a couple years now. No problems and it is easy to clean if something spills.

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Chessie

Like I said, check the reviews.

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bbstx

Back to the bakeware...My Pyrex dish is out of the DW and I can finally read exactly what it says (spaced like this):

No Stovetop No Broiler Use

Conventional Oven

Microwave Dishwasher Safe


I assume since it isn’t listed as safe, I shouldn’t be using it in the toaster oven.

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plllog

I think it means they didn't consider a toaster oven at all, or else consider it "conventional" as in radiant heat, rather than microwave.

If it mostly fills the cavity of the toaster oven, it'll have more stresses, but if you have a couple inches free on all sides, it should be okay. Make your own decision on how much you want to risk it.

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bbstx

I’ve already moved the rack from the lowest level to the mid-level. I’ll probably continue using, although I’ll have to admit that all of this spurred me to get out an 8x8 pan that I bought at Williams Sonoma some years ago. I had never washed it and put it into rotation. It is now.


All of this chatter about glass dishes in ovens reminds me of a famous Mom-story. My aunt and uncle came to visit one day. They stayed (no, surprise. She and Mom were exceptionally close). Finally, Mom realized she needed to do something about dinner. She pulled a casserole out of the freezer and stuck it in the oven (pre-microwave days). All was going well until Mom decided to stir the casserole because it was still frozen in the middle. As soon as that frozen chunk was stirred over onto a portion of the dish that was hot, the dish burst into many pieces and the casserole seeped down onto the floor of the oven.

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Compumom11

Chessie, I didn't read the reviews, thanks for the heads up. I don't seem to need any liner in my Breville tray. It cleans up just fine. Maybe I don't bake or broil enough to make a mess?

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Chessie

Compumom11 - Me either. Not sure why anyone would need to. Mine is easy to clean, but I have had it a few years now and I don't think I have had to clean it more than a few times to be honest. I rarely cook anything in there without a tray though. Maybe some folks don't use a tray and clearly that would make a mess. I don't know why you would do that though.

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Chessie

"I assume since it isn’t listed as safe, I shouldn’t be using it in the toaster oven."

That is not how I would interpret that. A toaster oven IS a conventional type of oven - simply smaller.

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Lars

I'm having trouble with using Corningware in the toaster oven that came with the house in Cathedral City. It is a somewhat small Black and Decker with convection, and the rack will not slide out with the Corningware on it without coming off the track, and so the whole thing falls down. I can only use Corningware on the rack if I do not slide the rack, which is okay for putting something in but not so great for getting something out. I definitely do not want to use my large oven right now, as it will be 101° today. Time to turn on the ceiling fans, to save on A/C.

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Chessie

Lars - Agree - I sure would not try to use a dish that would not fit "free and clear". That's one reason I love my Breville toaster oven - it is not a huge footprint on my counter (although it is just a little bit larger than my last one) but I can fit SO many dishes in it that I could not fit in others that were even larger overall. I use mine all the dang time - any time I can get away with not using my large oven, I do.

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Lars

I'm thinking about getting a Breville for our house in Los Angeles and then bring the toaster oven there to the house here, as it is larger and the Corningware fits in it with no problem. I've been wanting to replace it with a Breville for some time but could not justify it since it works so well. I think the rack problem I have here could be reason enough to switch out the toaster ovens and get rid of the problem.

We already replaced the stove here because the burners would not light without a match, even though the gas would come on.

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bbstx

Chef Steps has a tutorial on “Countertop Ovens.” Part of it is free, part of it is paid. I’m off to watch the free content.

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