Do any of you use MealBoard (app)? I just got it and love it.

plllog

I've looked at a lot of recipe, meal planning and entertaining apps, but I don't want a big commitment to making an app a way of life. I just want to be able to cook from my iPad. I used to do it all on my desktop computer and make and print lists, but I've replaced it with a less cooperative laptop and a wifi printer that doesn't always want to connect, and is a real pain just to turn on. Plus, my binders are overstuffed, and adding another means getting buried under more paper. Still, they had the tech just perfect for awhile, but that doesn't fit the expand or die income model, so they messed it all up.


I found myself scribbling the essentials on paper out of the recycling bin. I even had a nameless couple of those that I posted so the group could tell me what they were. I was given a cute journal that says Have A Happy Day! on every page, which would be annoying for serious use, but I thought would be a better place to scribble recipe bits, lists, etc., but it's not actually nice to cook from or take to the store. I've been known to e-mail recipes to my iPad and just cook from the mail server. It's so annoying with goopy hands when the energy saver lock blacks the screen, and I never remember to turn it off. Otherwise, the bigger objection is that there's no way to make notes that way unless one copies the email into a document app. And then there are formatting issues.


I don't use a lot of recipes, but sometimes I want to know a proportion or temperature or something, or make an exact thing, or try something new. Generally a few scribbles are fine, and sometimes I want the whole recipe.


I just found MealBoard. It's old and simple. Almost simplistic. It looks like it was designed in a database front end system. It's AWESOME. Some apps claim to do everything for you, but they're not quite successful, or want to change you to fit them, rather than them fitty you.


MealBoard has an online computer app that lets you copy and paste, and will do its best to put the quantity and preparation of ingredients in separate cells, which it gets pretty much right with my highly notated lists. You can also rearrange the order and insert subheadings You can just put the whole danged description of the ingredient including "size of a softball" or whatever else you want to say in the main field and it accepts it. There may be a limit, but I haven't hit it yet.


The online app also lets you write (or paste) whatever you want in the other main fields or write different things that they intended in other fields. Like, instead of description, I put the web address if I got the recipe online. It even lets you crib a picture just by pasting the image address. In other words, it's pretty stupid. The website isn't secure (it's just recipes so I don't care) but it also serves as a backup for your device, besides letting you look at your saved recipes from your computer, though they're merely alphabetical (I think). You can force sync to get it right away in your iPad.


In the iPad app, it's similarly old school, but has the basic functions you want. You can categorize the recipes and add your own categories (though they don't alphabetize into the native ones). You can enter recipes there as well. There's a meal planner that will list your recipes for a meal together. I wanted a notes page, and usually I have a guest list or similar, but, because it's so simple, it doesn't care that what you're writing in a recipe form isn't a recipe. I make a list of toppings to prepare for tonight's chili bar as a "recipe". It worked great! I could also just make my guest list in a "recipe".


To get that info out again, it's a simple select/copy/paste. There may be an export function, but it's not necessary. Huzzah!


There's also a customizable grocery list, and you can set it up to know what's in your pantry, and decide whether you want ingredients on your recipe put on the shopping list--and which shopping list, so you don't have to use the same list if you're going to multiple stores. It does its best to categorize by department (aisle) at the store, and you can fully customize that as well. Thank Heaven for basic!! What features it has, it does well, but it's so basic, it's actually useful.


Oh! And best feature of all? It doesn't lock and go black when you're displaying a recipe (maybe doesn't lock at all, but I haven't tested to be sure).


I wouldn't bother putting all my recipes in MealBoard. I'm happy using Word or plain text. It does take a little more effort to copy them in. Not much, but a little. For scribbling down something I'm about to make to take into the kitchen? Perfect!

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bragu_DSM 5

the walk sequence ingredient feature sounds handy ...

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Jasdip

Your comment about your wifi printer not connecting to your laptop jumped out at me.

That happens with mine so often! It drives me crazy. The printer is on, yet when I go to print something it says that it's offline. I have to go to the room its in, turn it off and on again, and hopefully it will recognize it. I thought it was just me. Is your printer an HP by any chance? This really pisses me off......a lot!

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plllog

Sigh. Unfortunately, Jasdip, what you describe is likely a fault of cost cutting. In theory, they could make the printer monitor itself and reinitialize when it loses signal or gets overstuffed and confused. Instead, it just sits there like a dummy waiting for you to power cycle it when it's doing poorly.

My printer is an Epsom, and works fine-ish with my iPad, Every time I think I've gotten it to talk to my Windows computer, however, it doesn't seem to stick. I'm sure I could fix it if I made it a priority, or bought a cable. I don't print often enough to leave it on, which is part of the problem, but I could just carry the laptop over and use a cable if I weren't stubborn.

Speaking of which, the app does print, as one would expect. It also has a built in basic browser with a function that will recognize a formatted recipe and import it, if you want it verbatim. I prefer editing while copying manually, and using a proper keyboard, but it's a good tool, especially when a computer isn't nearby. Just for the lock prevention and notation, it might be worth the import rather than just using on the web. There are a lot of other features for meal and food planning and storage that I'm not interested in, but seem equally easy to use and customize. I think this works so well because the app is meant as a meal manager more than a recipe keeper or an event planner. It just fits well with what I want it to do, even though I only "plan" a meal more complex than I can reliably keep in my head every now and then.

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sleevendog (5a NY 6aNYC NL CA)

It will be interesting to follow how you like it over time.

We used PepperPlate a few years ago for about a year, loved it, and then stopped for no real reason I can explain. Maybe a sign-in issue(?), who knows. Something annoying no doubt.

We are back to hard copy print-out. And a fantastic grocery list. Simple custom basic spreadsheet. One per month. Extra for holidays. Less than 20 sheets of paper a year. One simple shelved stainless book with plastic sleeves. A binder clip inside an upper cabinet. (old school)

I have a custom pull down shelf for iPad but sometimes one touch wrong slips it into oblivion when referencing a recipe. (so much for the future of technology) : )

A NewYears resolution that I've been keeping up with is seasonal and personal recipes. (what works). Pretty basic. 5 breads, 4 or so crackers and a flatbread. 5 corn meal based waffle, corn cakes, bread, savory/fruit topped. Winter soups, seafood,...another dozen. Summer season another 12...sousVide a dozen. Fall harvest. I bet about 100 (?) at the end of an entire year. (not including the breads). Just wrote down the 4th of July bbq ribs SousVide. Hard copy yet also filed. Computer crash no issues.

Print out when you can. Cookbook sales are on the rise I find surprising as I need or want none. Searching these days for a simple ingredient hint is so annoying with advertising pop-ups. I see it getting not much better but worse.



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chase_gw

I use PepperPlate but in a limited way.

I import recipes I want to try, fold them into my weekly or special weekend menus.......make a shopping list and if I like the recipe I move it to my Google Docs as a tried and true.If not delete......

Helps me keep track of recipes I want to try but haven't.....otherwise I forget I even have them.

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plllog

I did look at PepperPlate, but it was too involved for me even to figure out where the basic stuff was. I do browser bookmarks for things I'm looking at but not seriously, and save as text or Word recipes I think I'll make even if far in the future. I finally got my old recipes transferred to the new computer. Many years ago, I typed up all the bits of scratch paper that family recipes had been jotted on, as well as yellowing clippings. What I really should do is make some booklets in Publisher and bind them for posterity, but there's also the web.

My standard shopping is in my head, with an aid from Alexa. I don't have much use for it--I even forget to ask it when I want to know the time--but I love that I can tell it to put things on the shopping list without putting down what I'm working on and washing my hands, and then have it show up in my devices at the store. In this way, the MenuBoard shopping list is good, too. Very easy shopping from the app. You can also print or e-mail the shopping list (love that built-in honey-do).

I'm never going to be a power user. I have my most used recipes on paper in page protectors in a little binder, and two large binders (one cooking, one baking) with repeaters. And too many books. :) But I'm very happy with how this is doing for projects after just the chili bar. The corn muffins was a short recipe, so I typed that in too because the book doesn't lay open. :) (The muffins were good, but not the muffin. I don't know if I'll ever find that.) I've also entered the recipes for the Princess Cake into it.

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artemis_ma

No interest in the app.

I love cooking and don't want to limit myself to what it might perhaps turn up.

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plllog

Artemis, I don't know what you're referring to. I just use it instead of paper to display the recipe I'm using, group the recipes for a meal together, and make a grocery list. Same as I'd do in Word, but that shows on my iPad instead of on printout.

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John Liu

We need something a lot more sci-fi.

Imagine if you were cooking on the Enterprise. Sure, most meals come from the wall slots, but Starfleet knows that starship crews on long missions need relaxation and recreation, and cooking is one of the fundamental forms of R & R. So you walk into the kitchen, the door go "swooosh" behind you, and what's the first thing you do? "Computer, recipe for lapin a moutarde". "RABBIT IN MUSTARD SAUCE INGREDIENTS IN SLOT A. READY TO READ RECIPE."

Or, suppose you're cooking in a Rebel base. It is grittier here. You have your side of Bantha, still charred from the lightsaber cuts. Wait, what's the recipe for Bantha brisket? There's no cookbook - there's no books anywhere in the Star Wars universe. Instead, you call out to the cooking droid, which waddles over, extends an articulated arm, and projects an ingredient holo list in the room. Meanwhile, the droid follows you around, saucing and spicing on command. "More salt there". "BLEEP". "Not that much!" "BLOOP".

So I submit that, plllog, you need to put together something that combines spoken commands with a display on an articulated arm, perhaps ceiling mounted, all with voices like cheery Julia Child or reassuring Jacques Pepin.


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plllog

Amusing. But no. Just no. I'll take a Rosie, even with the attitude, so long as her wheel doesn't scratch the floor, but the 'bot had better be autonomous or stay out of my way!

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bragu_DSM 5

have you heard the Cookie Monster voice on the new driving directions app? totally useless but mildly funny. but useless. but humorous. but useless.

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